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2018 - ICA's 68th Annual Conference Pages: unavailable || Words: unavailable || 
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1. Billard, Thomas. "Setting the Transgender Agenda: Intermedia Agenda-Setting in the Digital News Environment" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the ICA's 68th Annual Conference, Hilton Prague, Prague, Czech Republic, May 22, 2018 Online <APPLICATION/PDF>. 2019-05-22 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1361656_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Transgender issues have recently (and rapidly) emerged as highly salient topics of political contestation in the United States. But why? This paper investigates one relevant factor: intermedia agenda setting between digital-native and legacy press news entities. Through a content analysis of the top-five digital-native and top-five legacy press online news entities from 2014 to 2015, we investigate the dynamics of intermedia agenda setting in the context of transgender topics, both at the level of attention to transgender topics in general and at the level of attention to specific issues related to the transgender community (e.g., anti-transgender violence). Results indicate significant causal effects of digital-native coverage on legacy press coverage at the level of general attention to transgender topics. However, results also indicate that at the level of specific transgender issues, digital-native coverage drives legacy press coverage on some issues, which legacy press coverage drives digital-native coverage on others. Implications for intermedia agenda setting in the digital news media environment and for the future of transgender political rights movements are discussed.

2015 - International Communication Association 65th Annual Conference Pages: unavailable || Words: 7263 words || 
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2. Han, Ji Yoon., Lee, Seungae., Lee, Olivia. and Choi, TaeRang. "Who Set the Media Agenda for the Sewol Ferry Tragedy in South Korea? Examining the Relationship Between Online Media and Online Community Using Intermedia Agenda-Setting Theory" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the International Communication Association 65th Annual Conference, Caribe Hilton, San Juan, Puerto Rico, May 21, 2015 Online <APPLICATION/PDF>. 2019-05-22 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p986180_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: The Sewol ferry tragedy was a major obtrusive issues in South Korea in 2014, and the agenda in the Korean online community (Daum Agora) seemed to be different from the agenda of the online media (Naver). This study examined the relationship between the online media agenda and the online community agenda, and the influence of the online community on news reporting related to the Sewol tragedy, taking into consideration intermedia agenda setting theory. This study further attempted to examine agenda setting theory by incorporating the Situation Crisis Communication Theory to better understand the various substantive attributes regarding crisis cases. Findings showed two portals initially delivered a different crisis agenda regarding the ferry tragedy, however, these two became more alike over time especially in terms of attacking the accuser. Interestingly, Daum preoccupied the most agendas (attack the accuser, diminish, and rebuild). This study provides greater understanding of online news consumption regarding the crisis issue.

2017 - ICA's 67th Annual Conference Pages: unavailable || Words: unavailable || 
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3. Dogu, Burak. and Mat, Onur. "Who Sets the Political Agenda? Applying the Network Agenda-Setting Model to Twitter" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the ICA's 67th Annual Conference, Hilton San Diego Bayfront, San Diego, USA, May 25, 2017 Online <APPLICATION/PDF>. 2019-05-22 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1229096_index.html>
Publication Type: Extended Abstract
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Based on the network agenda-setting (NAS) model, this research aims to reveal the links between agendas in the domains of politics and media. Also referred to as the third level of agenda-setting theory, the NAS model suggests that the salience of the network relationships among issues can be transferred from the news media to the public. The model draws on the potential offered by network analysis, therefore enables the analysis of issues as a bundle. This exploratory research carries the NAS model to Twitter, and expands its context to include the political agenda. It questions whether the media in Turkey can still have an effect on political discourse in a setting where direct political pressure is a growing issue of concern. Findings from the Twitter accounts of the MPs in the Turkish Parliament and a large variety media accounts are compared to explore the interrelations among the domains of politics and media.

2018 - MPSA Annual Conference Words: 33 words || 
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4. Hudson, Jennifer L.. "Wage-Setting Institutions and Wage Inequality in the OECD: An Examination of the Effects of Liberalization of Wage-Setting Institutions and Membership in the EU and EMU on Wage Inequality" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the MPSA Annual Conference, Palmer House Hilton, Chicago, IL, Apr 05, 2018 <Not Available>. 2019-05-22 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1350425_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: I examine the effects of liberalization of wage-setting institutions and EU, and expressly EMU, membership on wage inequality across 24 OECD countries (2000-2013) at three wage differentials, revealing critical intricacies in these relationships.

2005 - American Society of Criminology Words: 256 words || 
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5. Perrone, Dina. ""Drug, Set, and Setting": The Neglected Factors of the US Response to Club Drugs" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Society of Criminology, Royal York, Toronto, Nov 15, 2005 <Not Available>. 2019-05-22 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p33115_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Abstract: Becker (1963) and Zinberg (1984) explain that drug effects differ greatly depending on variations in the individual (‘set’) and situational (‘setting’) factors in which the drugs are consumed. Patterns, settings, rituals, and the significance attached to one’s drug use mitigates a drug’s pharmacological effects. Despite the documented importance such factors play for controlled substance use and harm reduction, governmental legislation and criminal justice approaches to drugs has focused solely on these drugs’ harmful and deadly effects seeking to completely eradicate illicit drug use. This approach has been especially true with club drugs.

In this paper, I will describe how 30 club drug users aged 22-33 that frequented New York City dance venues managed triggers of potentially harmful effects of their club drug use. Specifically, these ketamine, ecstasy, crystal methamphetamine, GHB, and/or cocaine users have avoided the negative consequences associated with illicit drug use (i.e. arrest, emergency room visits/other negative health consequences and unemployment). Conscious of the potential harms associated with club drugs, most of these users monitored dosage and food intake, avoided certain drug combinations, took responsibility for friends, and controlled or reduced their use during important life events. Overall, this paper will consider how current club drug policy 1) ignores the importance of ‘set’ and ‘setting’ in controlling drug use, 2) could potentially cause harm by dismantling the individual and situational factors that play a crucial role in promoting safe drug use, and 3) would be more effective if it incorporated a more balanced approach to drug use.

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