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2014 - American Sociological Association Annual Meeting Pages: unavailable || Words: 11688 words || 
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1. Vijayakumar, Gowri. "Is Sex Work Sex or is Sex Work Work? Analyzing Sex Worker Identity" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Sociological Association Annual Meeting, Hilton San Francisco Union Square and Parc 55 Wyndham San Francisco, San Francisco, CA, Aug 15, 2014 Online <PDF>. 2018-11-19 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p726018_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: This paper investigates the ways in which gendered relationships to sex as work shape the possibilities for a “sex worker” identity among poor and working-class sex workers in Bangalore, India. To what extent can people who do sex work coalesce around a shared “sex worker” identity, and what are the limits to this coalition? Using interviews with male, female, and transgender members of a sex worker union, I show that the answer depends on gender, sexuality, and labor relations. Men, women, and transgender women articulate distinct relationships to “sex worker” identity because they experience sex work in distinct ways, falling on a spectrum from sex work as an extension of sex to sex work as an extension of work. For men, selling sex is intertwined with networks of unpaid sex pursued for pleasure, while for women and transgenders, sex work begins as a source of income, either to maintain a family income or to secure membership in the hijra community. For none of the groups does sex work itself emerge as a primary identity; instead, my interviewees most commonly identified as poor women workers, transgender women, or men who like to “do sex,” respectively. Nevertheless, shared work experiences allowed for solidarity—addressing shared stigma, violence and exploitation on the job, and the risks of disclosure. My analysis confirms feminist scholarship in suggesting that movements built on sex work as a form of gendered labor, rather than a unique personal identity, resonate with poor sex workers’ own experiences of work.

2017 - American Sociological Association Annual Meeting Pages: unavailable || Words: unavailable || 
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2. Cheng, Simon. and Kelley, Kristin. "One Sex, Two Sexes, One Parent, Two Parents: Public Attitudes Toward Single and Same-Sex Parenthood" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Sociological Association Annual Meeting, Palais des Congrès de Montréal, Montreal, Canada, Aug 09, 2017 Online <APPLICATION/PDF>. 2018-11-19 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1255206_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Despite the centrality of child wellbeing arguments in the debates on single and same-sex parents vs. two heterosexual parents, there is surprisingly little research on public perceptions of single parents’ and same-sex couples’ parenting quality. We use data from the 2012 General Social Survey to compare and contrast public views of single parents and lesbian mothers and gay fathers. Nearly half of the respondents agree that single parents can parent as effectively as two parents and that gay and lesbian parents can parent as effectively as a male-female couple. Approximately half of the respondents provide similar responses regarding the effectiveness of single and same-sex parents, while approximately one-fourth give higher ratings to single parents and the other one-fourth give higher ratings to same-sex parents. Public attitudes vary across sociodemographic lines: men, older adults, and married respondents are less likely than their female, younger, and unmarried counterparts to view both single parents and same-sex parents as effective. Educational attainment and self-reported religiosity have greater influence on the rating of same-sex parents than of single parents, while race has a greater influence on the rating of single parents than of same-sex parents. Public views regarding both single parents and same-sex parents also are positively linked to preferences for generous childcare policies by the government, liberal gender role attitudes, and tolerance of sexual liberties. When public views regarding both single parents and same-sex parent diverge, however, public opinion regarding sexual liberties is the most influential attitudinal factor. Implications of these patterns are discussed.

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