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2014 - International Communication Association 64th Annual Conference Pages: unavailable || Words: 8760 words || 
Info
1. McGraw, Jessica. and Rill, Lesile. "Shades of Sexting: Social Versus Sexual Sexting" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the International Communication Association 64th Annual Conference, Seattle Sheraton Hotel, Seattle, Washington, May 21, 2014 Online <APPLICATION/PDF>. 2019-10-16 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p716630_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Given the dynamic nature of the sexting phenomenon, more research is needed to examine the various nuances of the practice and their social impact. The following study contributes to this vein by exploring the sexting experiences of 20 young people. Two distinct forms of sexting emerge from participant narratives, both involving different motivations and social outcomes. Importantly, each form manifests in and impacts interpersonal relationships in different ways. As such, this study provides a unique contribution to sexting literature to date, and opens the door for more well-rounded discussions and social policies cognizant of both the positive and negative outcomes of electronic forms of sexual and communication.

2014 - International Communication Association 64th Annual Conference Pages: unavailable || Words: 6693 words || 
Info
2. Omori, Kikuko. and Allen, Mike. "Sexting: Motivation and Underlying Mechanisms of Sexting" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the International Communication Association 64th Annual Conference, Seattle Sheraton Hotel, Seattle, Washington, May 21, 2014 Online <APPLICATION/PDF>. 2019-10-16 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p708674_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: The current study examines college students’ sexting behavior and the underlying motivation for sexting using Social Cognitive Theory. An online survey (N = 220) provided the basis for analyzing a structural equation modeling. The major findings are: (a) contrary to previous studies, the perception of pressure from romantic partners and peers did not significantly predict sexting, and (b) self-presentation, disinhibition, as well as perception of advantage, significantly mediated the relationship between the behavior of sexting and the descriptive norm.

2015 - National Women's Studies Association Words: 98 words || 
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3. Hasinoff, Amy. "How to Have Great Sext: Discourses of Consent in Sexting Advice Online" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the National Women's Studies Association, Wisconsin Center, Milwaukee, WI, <Not Available>. 2019-10-16 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1024878_index.html>
Publication Type: Individual Paper
Abstract: This paper examines discourses about consent in sexting advice articles on popular websites like Cosmopolitan.com and menshealth.com. Compared to general sex advice, tips about sexting tend to stress the importance of consent more often, warning sexters about the potential harm to the recipient of an unwanted sexual text. I argue that this may be a result of particular affordances of mobile phones that make sexual communication easier both to initiate and to resist. Mainstream discourse about consent in sexting offers a model of popular resistance to rape culture that could inform and build on feminist models of consent.

2018 - ICA's 68th Annual Conference Pages: unavailable || Words: unavailable || 
Info
4. Speno, Ashton. "Sext-ual Double Standards: Gender Differences and the Gender-Related Consequences of Sexting for Adolescents" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the ICA's 68th Annual Conference, Hilton Prague, Prague, Czech Republic, May 22, 2018 Online <APPLICATION/PDF>. 2019-10-16 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1365768_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: This study explored a possible sexual double standard for adolescent boys and girls regarding sexting through a survey of 201 girls and boys aged 14-17 in the Midwestern region of the United States. The results showed that even though girls felt more negatively about sexting than boys, they felt a strong pressure to sext and thus intended to sext, while boys were more likely to request sext messages than girls. Furthermore, girls reported experiencing more negative consequences of sexting while boys reaped more benefits of sexting, and the acceptance of women as sex objects predicts attitudes about sexting and intention to sext for both boys and girls. Thus, the results confirm that at least in this sample, sexting functions on a system of sexual double standards. The results of this study can inform parents, teens, practitioners, and researchers about sexting double-standards, and can aid targeted intervention programs.

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