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2015 - International Communication Association 65th Annual Conference Pages: unavailable || Words: 13846 words || 
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1. John, Nicholas. "It Ain’t What You Share (It’s The Way That You Share It): The Surprising Regulation of Sharing in Private BitTorrent File-Sharing Communities" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the International Communication Association 65th Annual Conference, Caribe Hilton, San Juan, Puerto Rico, May 21, 2015 Online <APPLICATION/PDF>. 2018-12-14 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p983261_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: This paper is about the ways that members of private BitTorrent sites talk about the mechanisms used to monitor the extent to which they are sharing files in a reciprocal fashion. These mechanisms—known as share ratio enforcement—exist so that file sharers upload as much data as they download. File sharing is an arena in which we can see the metaphor of ‘sharing’ at work and enquire into its modus operandi there, both by looking at the ways in which the word is used, as well as the ways it is explicitly highlighted as a resource in attempts to shape the moral contours of the file sharing endeavor. Analysis of forum discussions about share ratios reveals a number of counter-intuitive findings, for instance, that sometimes the way to contribute to a file-sharing community is by not sharing. The deployment of the word ‘sharing’ as a rhetorical strategy is discussed.

2011 - American Sociological Association Annual Meeting Pages: unavailable || Words: 6909 words || 
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2. Tatlock, Anne. "Share and Share Alike: Does Income Sharing Imply Household Sharing?" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Sociological Association Annual Meeting, Caesar's Palace, Las Vegas, NV, Aug 19, 2011 Online <PDF>. 2018-12-14 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p495619_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Prior research has typically approached studies of household inequality from two primary perspectives: the resources perspective and the gender ideology perspective. This study considers income organization as a way to incorporate both resources and beliefs to better address questions of the inter-relationship between aspects of household management and their implications for equality. This study uses data from the 2002 General Social Survey to analyze the relationship between heterosexual couples’ income organization strategies and the extent to which they share chores and decisions (n=596). Results from seemingly unrelated regression analyses show that couples who share their incomes also share more chores than couples who do not share money. However, in regard to shared decisions, results indicate that as long as couples do not keep money separate, they report sharing more decisions, indicating that chore sharing and decision-making processes are different.

2016 - American Sociological Association Annual Meeting Pages: unavailable || Words: unavailable || 
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3. Oszkay Febres-Cordero, Yotala. "Shared Goods but What about Shared Identities? The Resonance of the Sharing Economy in Communities" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Sociological Association Annual Meeting, Washington State Convention Center, Seattle, WA, Aug 17, 2016 Online <APPLICATION/PDF>. 2018-12-14 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1122480_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Since the economic downturn of 2008, a set of companies known as the “sharing economy” has emerged with claims to bring more sustainability, egalitarianism, and solidarity to local economic exchange. However, beyond economic valuations and the companies’ claims of social benefit, very little is known about how exactly this form of social enterprise resonates in local communities. This paper asks: are the organizational identities of sharing economy firms reflected in the characteristics of their communities of users? What type of user constitutes the sharing economy “movement” and to what extent does it match the movement envisioned by the firms? Using an original dataset that merges 2010-2016 U.S. census demographics, 2011 NCCS nonprofit data, and 2015 listing data scraped from the home-sharing website Airbnb.com for 51,176 U.S. census tracts, I analyze the extent to which claims about the sharing economy’s benefits match the identifiers of neighborhoods where Airbnb listings are most dense. My preliminary analysis indicates that sharing economy firms and their local membership share commitments to social welfare and awareness, but that these commitments are complicated by the profit-seeking model of the sharing economy. In particular, the Airbnb case illustrates that membership is strong in communities characterized by high levels of nonprofit services and education but also in communities with racial homogeneity and significant wealth, a reality that challenges the company’s claims of egalitarianism. Such findings extend understanding of the organizational authenticity of movements in the marketplace, highlighting how the contradictory goals of the social enterprise resonate with consumer audiences.

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