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2017 - APSA Annual Meeting & Exhibition Words: 134 words || 
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1. Porter, Ethan. and Wood, Thomas. "Does The Daily Show Matter? Television Shows, Vote Choice, and Public Opinion" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the APSA Annual Meeting & Exhibition, TBA, San Francisco, CA, Aug 31, 2017 <Not Available>. 2019-10-15 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1248913_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: In this study, we exploit changes in some of the most popular U.S. comedic television news shows to measure the effects of media on vote choice and public opinion. Specifically, we look at whether Comedy Central's Daily Show, as well as the show that follows it, had observable effects on 2016 primary voting and attitude positions. Our identification strategy relies upon the fact that both Jon Stewart and Stephen Colbert were replaced in short order, with Trevor Noah and Larry Wilmore respectively. We merge a vast data set of minute-by-minute ratings data with results from the Democratic presidential primary and responses to a panel survey, presenting both descriptive and instrumental variable results. We find that both shows play surprisingly large roles in how people vote, and the positions they hold on key policy issues.

2007 - International Communication Association Pages: 26 pages || Words: 6681 words || 
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2. Cohen, Jonathan. and Weimann, Gabriel. "Who's Afraid of Reality Shows? Exploring the Perceived Influence of Reality Shows and the Concern Over Their Social Effects" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the International Communication Association, TBA, San Francisco, CA, May 23, 2007 Online <PDF>. 2019-10-15 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p170111_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Abstract: This study explores the dynamics of social concern over reality shows. Couched in the theory of the influence of presumed influence, it is argued that the degree of concern over the effects of media mediates between beliefs in media power and people's responses to such beliefs. Survey data show that whereas there are large differences in the beliefs about effects on self and others, reports of self concern and perceived concern by others is similar. It was also found that concern is related to age, to beliefs in the social effects of reality shows, and to being critical of reality shows. Results are discussed in terms of their significance to understanding the process through which beliefs about media motivate social action.

2007 - American Sociological Association Pages: 19 pages || Words: 8762 words || 
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3. Barmeyer, Mareike. "The endogenous orderliness of talk shows: Making things invisible and making things visible at the Trisha Show" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Sociological Association, TBA, New York, New York City, Aug 10, 2007 Online <PDF>. 2019-10-15 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p184011_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Abstract: To the television viewer, the studio audience appears as a spontaneous reacting single body, a crowd smoothly engaging in sequences of collective behaviour. Hidden is the enormous amount of management needed before, during and after the process of recording the show to create this impression. It is the work that goes into this management that is the focus of my analysis.
Using my fieldnotes to describe the work that is going on in talk shows, I am taking the path of an ethnographer. Coming from an ethnomethodological approach, however, the data presented are taken from fieldnotes, in which my own understandings and activities provide the phenomena for analysis.
As one of the things people do in talk shows is talk, I will also look closely at that talk, showing what is done through talk at particular moments in the show.

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