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2017 - APSA Annual Meeting & Exhibition Words: 134 words || 
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1. Porter, Ethan. and Wood, Thomas. "Does The Daily Show Matter? Television Shows, Vote Choice, and Public Opinion" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the APSA Annual Meeting & Exhibition, TBA, San Francisco, CA, Aug 31, 2017 <Not Available>. 2019-06-16 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1248913_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: In this study, we exploit changes in some of the most popular U.S. comedic television news shows to measure the effects of media on vote choice and public opinion. Specifically, we look at whether Comedy Central's Daily Show, as well as the show that follows it, had observable effects on 2016 primary voting and attitude positions. Our identification strategy relies upon the fact that both Jon Stewart and Stephen Colbert were replaced in short order, with Trevor Noah and Larry Wilmore respectively. We merge a vast data set of minute-by-minute ratings data with results from the Democratic presidential primary and responses to a panel survey, presenting both descriptive and instrumental variable results. We find that both shows play surprisingly large roles in how people vote, and the positions they hold on key policy issues.

2007 - International Communication Association Pages: 26 pages || Words: 6681 words || 
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2. Cohen, Jonathan. and Weimann, Gabriel. "Who's Afraid of Reality Shows? Exploring the Perceived Influence of Reality Shows and the Concern Over Their Social Effects" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the International Communication Association, TBA, San Francisco, CA, May 23, 2007 Online <PDF>. 2019-06-16 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p170111_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Abstract: This study explores the dynamics of social concern over reality shows. Couched in the theory of the influence of presumed influence, it is argued that the degree of concern over the effects of media mediates between beliefs in media power and people's responses to such beliefs. Survey data show that whereas there are large differences in the beliefs about effects on self and others, reports of self concern and perceived concern by others is similar. It was also found that concern is related to age, to beliefs in the social effects of reality shows, and to being critical of reality shows. Results are discussed in terms of their significance to understanding the process through which beliefs about media motivate social action.

2013 - ASC Annual Meeting Words: 79 words || 
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3. Lamphere, Renee. "“Show me Yours, I’ll Show you Mine …I Use that Every Time”: Exploring Teenage Sexting" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the ASC Annual Meeting, Palmer House Hilton, Chicago, IL, Nov 14, 2013 <Not Available>. 2019-06-16 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p664789_index.html>
Publication Type: Individual Paper
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: In fall 2011, a total of 20 freshman-level college students participated in focus group sessions on the topic of teenage sexting. A total of three focus groups were conducted: one male-only group, one female-only group, and one group of both male and female participants. A number of interesting results were yielded from the group responses. This paper highlights the relevant themes that emerged from the focus group sessions, and gives possible directions for future research on this emerging topic.

2012 - American Sociological Association Annual Meeting Pages: unavailable || Words: 6172 words || 
Info
4. McCabe, Janice., Harvey, Amber. and Richburg, Kayla. "Where are the Children? Examining Primetime Network TV Shows and Viewers’ Favorite Shows, 1994-2009" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Sociological Association Annual Meeting, Colorado Convention Center and Hyatt Regency, Denver, CO, Aug 16, 2012 Online <APPLICATION/PDF>. 2019-06-16 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p563269_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Media representations of specific groups, including their absence, impact people’s perceptions of these groups. We examine all primetime network televisions shows in 1994, 1999, 2004, and 2009 to determine whether children are present and in central roles. We compare overall trends in the presence and centrality of children to those in the most-watched shows reported by people and, specifically, tweens and teens. We find that the proportion of shows on air including children present dropped from 1994 to 2009 (from 69% to 52%). This decline over time was sharper for the most popular shows, although, in each year, tweens and teens’ favorite shows are more likely to include children than are American’s favorite shows. Shows with children in central roles also declined sharply from 1994 to 2009; in 1994 approximately three-quarters of favorite shows (whether of people, tweens, or teens) included at least one child in a central role; however, this declined to less than one-third of shows in 2009. Tweens’ most-watched shows saw the largest decline in the proportion with children in central roles (from 79% in 1994 to 5% in 2009). The only gender difference was a sharper decline for teen girls than boys; the proportion of girls’ favorite shows including children in a central role dropped 55 percent over the 15 year period while that for boys dropped 25 percent. Children are not only seeing fewer representations of themselves on primetime network television in 2009 than in 1994, they also are watching fewer shows that include children.

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