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2017 - DSI Annual Meeting Pages: unavailable || Words: unavailable || 
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1. zhu, wenge. "Sustainability in New Product Development: complementary or substitutional on Demand’s side, development-intensive or production-intensive on supply’s side" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the DSI Annual Meeting, Washington Hilton, Washington DC, Nov 18, 2017 Online <PDF>. 2019-06-16 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1292971_index.html>
Publication Type: Abstract
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: I propose an economic model to capture the trade-offs in designing sustainability. On the demand side is the tension between sustainability and performance: complementary and substitutional. On the supply side the cost of providing either sustainability or performance is also depending on the categorization of the products: development-intensive or production-intensive.

2018 - American Research Center in Egypt (ARCE) Annual Meeting Words: 249 words || 
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2. Butner, Amy. "This-Side That-Side: Thebes, Amarna, and the diesseitige Jenseits" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Research Center in Egypt (ARCE) Annual Meeting, University Park Hotel, Tucson, AZ, Apr 20, 2018 <Not Available>. 2019-06-16 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1389315_index.html>
Publication Type: Best Student Paper Proposal
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: New Kingdom conceptions of the afterlife focused on the desire to join the god Osiris in the underworld (Duat). Royal tombs of the period were decorated with detailed depictions of the sun’s nocturnal journey through the Duat, and images of Osiris appear regularly in non-royal tombs at Thebes. Non-royal tombs at Amarna, by contrast, with their emphasis on the royal family, ritual, and cityscape, seem to reflect a new conception of the afterlife. At Amarna the Duat appears to have vanished, and instead the afterlife is spent among the temples and gardens of the city. The space of the afterlife (Jenseits) has merged with the space of the living (Diesseits).
However, explicit depictions of the Duat are rare in non-royal Theban tombs of the early 18th dynasty. It is not until the post-Amarna period that maps of the Duat and images of its denizens regularly appear. The afterlife illustrated in 18th dynasty Theban tomb chapels also extends into the space of the living. Tomb owners at both Thebes and Amarna express their desire to leave their tombs as ba-spirits to watch the rising of the sun, and to take part in ritual offerings in the temple.
This paper will examine visual and textual references to the afterlife and the underworld in non-royal tomb chapels of Amarna and of early 18th dynasty Thebes in order to explore the nature of the merged world of the living and the dead and to lay the foundations for new interpretations of Amarna tomb decoration.

2009 - International Communication Association Pages: 23 pages || Words: 6949 words || 
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3. Washington, Myra. "East Side, West Side, But Not Worldwide: The Politics of Asian Crossover in Hip-Hop Music" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the International Communication Association, Marriott, Chicago, IL, May 20, 2009 Online <PDF>. 2019-06-16 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p299481_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Through the examination of factors that include race, space, authenticity and hybridity to explain why Asian artists have been unable to successfully crossover into mainstream U.S. market, this paper seeks to analyze the issues embroiled in both the pleasures of identification with the importation of U.S. hip-hop by Asian countries and the politics involved in the appropriation, imitation, localization and ultimately exportation of this new transnational version of hip-hop culture. Using Asian hip-hop artists M.I.A. and Panjabi MC as case studies, the tropes used to describe them are compared against the tropes used to describe U.S. hip-hop artists; which indict the politics inherent in crossover and the role of globalization in creating obstacles for the entry of Asian hip-hop artists into the global hip-hop market.

2015 - AEJMC International Regional Conference Pages: unavailable || Words: 5626 words || 
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4. Wan, Chih-An. "Languages work side by side: Effects of English on code-mixed advertising persuasion" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the AEJMC International Regional Conference, Pontificia Universidad Caólica de Chile, Santiago, Chile, Oct 15, 2015 Online <APPLICATION/PDF>. 2019-06-16 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1040941_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: This study aims at investigating the effect of different languages on code-mixed advertisement. Using the case of Taiwan, we emphasize that the effect of advertisement is varied for English. While foreign language is unfamiliar to people in Taiwan, English can offer the connotation of internationalization. Using the elaboration likelihood model (ELM) as theoretical basis, the study employed a 3 (language: full Mandarin/ full English/ Mandarin-English mixed) × 2 (involvement: low vs. high) experiment. The result of this study supports the hypothesis that language has an effect on advertisement. In addition, the result also suggests that English serves a different role causing audience to taken different route depending on its alone presentation or mix with Mandarin.

2013 - American Studies Association Annual Meeting Words: 340 words || 
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5. Railton, Benjamin. "Side by Side: Locating Dissenting Voices In New England's Public Spaces" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Studies Association Annual Meeting, Hilton Washington, Washington, DC, <Not Available>. 2019-06-16 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p656193_index.html>
Publication Type: Internal Paper
Abstract: The Salem’s Witch Trials Memorial, designed by contest winners Maggie Smith and James Cutler and dedicated at the Trials’ 1992 Tercentenary, has been rightly lauded for many features: the eerie power of its horizontal gravestones, and of the brief but tragic historical details included on each; the quiet, green, and tree-lined central space that complements those markers; the excerpts from the victims’ statements written on the stones over which visitors must step to enter; and the Memorial’s overall simplicity and understatement (in a city that has come to be known for its excessive witch-related paraphernalia). Yet one of its most striking and salient elements has generally been overlooked: its location directly adjacent to one of the city’s oldest cemeteries, a space where many prominent citizens (of that era and since) were buried. Indeed, one of the Memorial’s two entrances opens up into that cemetery, and so the victims’ voices located on the stones there could be said to communicate in both directions.

There are various ways we could read these side by side spaces: as contrasting the victims with the city’s elites, and highlighting the disparity in status that contributed directly to the Trials; as symbolically forcing those elite citizens to come face to face (or at least space to space) with their darkest actions; as offering alternative histories that tell very different stories of Salem’s past and identity; or, given the open entrance that connects the two, as interconnected and inseparable parts of a larger community and shared history, one visitors must work to make sense of as a whole. In this talk, I will address each reading but focus on the final one as an ideal toward which we should work. And I will do so by comparing the Witch Trials Memorial to another New England public historical site, Plimoth Plantation, and specifically to two complex, dueling, and yet interconnected side by side sites within it: the recreated 17th century English Village (with its in-character historical interpreters) and the working Wampanoag Homesite (with its 21st century Native American interpreters).

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