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2012 - International Communication Association Pages: unavailable || Words: 9473 words || 
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1. Xie, Shuang. "Similarity and Difference or Similarity in Difference?: China’s TV Programming in Global Trend of Neo-Liberal Imperialism" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the International Communication Association, Sheraton Phoenix Downtown, Phoenix, AZ, May 24, 2012 Online <PDF>. 2019-08-18 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p553295_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: In this project, I adopt thesis of media imperialism and neo-liberal imperialism to examine the entire Chinese TV industry by focusing on three leading networks – Phoenix TV, Hunan TV, and China Central Television(CCTV). The purpose of this project is to discover how the Chinese TV industry as a whole has balanced between global neo-liberalism and party control, as well as to examine what role the general trend of neo-liberal globalization and the Party control of the media intertwine in the Chinese TV industry, and what this intertwining means to the Chinese society. Through in-depth analysis of three TV stations’ programming strategies and strategies to gain commercial revenues, I find with respect to program content, Phoenix’s emphasis is on international news, infotainment, and elite-oriented programs. CCTV, as the ideological apparatus of the Party, carries a plethora of propagandist content. Hunan TV’s main task is entertaining people. However, with the marketization of the entire Chinese TV industry, the West-rooted neo-liberal commercialization is very evident in each of these three networks.

2017 - American Society of Criminology Words: 205 words || 
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2. Hauser, William., Schriefer, Gina. and Salvo, RJ. "[Un]structured Sentencing: Do Similarly Situated Offenders Receive Similar Treatment Under Florida’s Guidelines?" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Society of Criminology, Philadelphia Marriott Downtown, Philadelphia, PA, Nov 14, 2017 <Not Available>. 2019-08-18 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1278927_index.html>
Publication Type: Individual Paper
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Considerable research has been devoted to the study of sentencing disparities associated with extra-legal attributes such as race, ethnicity, sex, and age. The central concern implicit in these studies is that of fairness in courtroom outcomes. Simple consistency in sentences is a related issue also arousing concerns about fairness that has received considerably less attention. This issue is manifest in the goal of treating similarly situated offenders similarly. The present study uses several analytic frameworks including multilevel models to examine variation in sentences using Florida felony court data on more than 1.9 million offenders. Results demonstrate considerable jurisdictional variation in the use of prison across Florida’s twenty circuits, particularly for those offenders who fall in the “prison optional” range of Florida’s presumptive guidelines. Sentence lengths, in contrast, generally fall within three years of the guidelines specified minimum sentence in most jurisdictions. However, some offenders received drastically longer sentences of ten or more years more than the expected minimum sentence. Further examination reveals these unlucky offenders tend to be those convicted at trial. The paper concludes with a discussion of potential reforms to Florida’s guidelines to ensure that similarly situated offenders receive similar treatment in the courtroom.

2004 - North American Chapter of the International Group for the Psychology of Mathematics Education Pages: 7 pages || Words: 2299 words || 
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3. Davis, Clarence. "“All Triangles are Similar” Tracing Rose's Understanding of Similarity using Lesson Plan Study." Paper presented at the annual meeting of the North American Chapter of the International Group for the Psychology of Mathematics Education, Delta Chelsea Hotel, Toronto, Ontario, Canada, Oct 21, 2004 Online <.PDF>. 2019-08-18 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p117589_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: The investigation of prospective teachers’(PST) knowledge of similarity was part of a larger study that investigated PST knowledge of what and how to teach concepts dealing with proportional reasoning, while engaged in Lesson Plan Study (LPS). The LPS research method was based on the idea of Japanese lesson study and looked at ways PST developed an introductory lesson on proportional reasoning topics. The LPS contained four distinct stages. The first stage was an individual interview in which a researcher tried to get an understanding of what the research subject knew about similarity and how she might teach similarity. The protocol for the individual interview consisted three major components: pre-interview, lesson planning, and post-interview. During the second stage was a group interview, the research subject was grouped with four other subjects and asked to construct a group presentation on similarity and discuss their ideas. The third stage was the presentation of the group lesson to the methods class that the research subject was enrolled. In the last stage of the LPS, the research subject produced a reconstructed view of her individual lesson plan. The growth of the PST knowledge of similarity was assessed within the Pirie-Kieren(1994) model of growth in understanding as adapted by Berenson, Cavey, Clark and Staley (2001) to teacher preparation, while noting instances of folding back, and collecting (Pirie & Martin, 2000). Within each level of the teacher preparation model, aspects of the PST knowledge of similarity were looked at for potential growth in the context of what and how to teach.

2012 - International Communication Association Words: 119 words || 
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4. Cohen, Jonathan. and Weimann-Saks, Dana. "Exploring the Similarity-Identification Hypothesis: The Role of Perceived Similarity" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the International Communication Association, Sheraton Phoenix Downtown, Phoenix, AZ, <Not Available>. 2019-08-18 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p553465_index.html>
Publication Type: Session Paper
Abstract: The identification of audiences with narrative characters who deliver health messages has been revealed as an important predictor of the persuasiveness of these messages (Moyer-Guse', 2008).This finding necessitates a more serious consideration of how health practitioners can promote identification with characters. One leading hypothesis (Hoffner& Cantor, 1991) is that characters thatare similar to audience members are more likely to garner stronger identification than non-similar characters. In this talk we will a) explain this hypothesis, its theoretical logic and conceptual shortcomings, b) critique existing research that mostly confuses similarity with perceived similarity by discussing and empirically demonstrating the differences between these concepts and their relationships to identification and persuasion, and c) present some initial data testing the similarity-identification hypothesis.

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