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2010 - ISME World Conference and Commission Seminars Words: 245 words || 
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1. Liu, Dawei. and Xia, Meijun. "Singing Science and Scientific Singing: An Analysis of “ Scientific Singing Vocalization”" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the ISME World Conference and Commission Seminars, China Conservatory of Music (CC) and Chinese National Convention Centre (CNCC), Beijing, China, Aug 01, 2010 <Not Available>. 2020-02-22 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p404125_index.html>
Publication Type: Accepted as Poster
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Singing, involving human voice and sound, is one of musical esthetic and creative activities of human beings. And as a unique human art, it has everything to do with science. However, singing and science belong to different domains and categories. Singing, one form of art, is a special method for people to understand the world by appealing to emotion and imagination. Actually it is in the pursuit of esthetic and style diversities. But science is going in for the regular cognition–from the phenomenon to the nature of things in the external world. In fact it is one kind of knowledge system and often depends on such thinking patterns as categories, theorems, and laws to reflect the essences and rules of various phenomena in the real world. Singing art focuses on the pursuit of diversities and richness, whereas, science emphasizes uniqueness, repeatability, and exclusiveness of subjective and objective conditions, which are always hard to be compatible and coordinate. Obviously plenty of disciplinary scientific knowledge, theories, and methods are certainly involved in the processes of singing. But if singing methods are to be scientifically defined, such definitions will not be accurate and complete. Therefore, concepts of “scientific singing methods”, with evident exclusiveness, will be sure to go against rich ecological culture which contributes a lot to singing styles as well as methods. In essence, the very definition originates from wrong ideas existing in European dominant culture, of which we should have a strong awareness all the time.

2012 - ISME World Conference and Commission Seminars Words: 308 words || 
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2. Rutkowski, Joanne. "The Effect of a Male Singing Model on Kindergarten Children’s Use of Singing Voice Achievement" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the ISME World Conference and Commission Seminars, Thessaloniki Concert Hall, Thessaloniki, Greece, Jul 15, 2012 <Not Available>. 2020-02-22 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p554785_index.html>
Publication Type: Poster for Commission Seminars
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Replicable singing models are important as children learn to use their singing voices. Previous research indicates that for elementary school aged children a child model is most effective, then a female model, then a male model. However, in my work with preschool children in a more informal setting, I have noticed that many of these children do not seem to have difficulties singing along with my male undergraduate students. In this setting, the children hear female and male voices singing simultaneously in their appropriate octaves. The purpose of this study is to investigate the effect of a male singing model on kindergarten children’s singing voice achievement. Twenty kindergarten children are receiving informal music guidance once a week for 30-40 minutes over a three-month period from a team of two music teachers, one female and one male. The teachers sing together during activities, but sometimes the female teacher takes the lead; other times the male teacher takes the lead. After one music class, the children were administered the Singing Voice Development Measure (SVDM) twice, two days apart. The female teacher administered the test first with her voice as the singing model. The male teacher administered the test on the second day with his voice as the singing model. At the end of the semester, SVDM will be administered in the same manner. Pretest data were collected in September 2011; posttest data will be collected in December 2011. Two raters will evaluate the randomized recordings of the children’s use of singing voice. Pearson correlation coefficients will be used to determine the intra- and inter-rater reliabilities on SVDM. Repeated measures ANOVA will be used to analyze the data to determine if the children respond significantly differently to the female and male models prior to and after instruction.

2011 - ASC Annual Meeting Words: 162 words || 
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3. Feldman, Cory. "Life after Sing Sing" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the ASC Annual Meeting, Washington Hilton, Washington, DC, <Not Available>. 2020-02-22 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p517648_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Abstract: The term ‘prisoner reentry’ has garnered more attention as the number of people being released from prison began growing exponentially over the past decade. While a myriad of services, strategies, and policies have developed around the reentry of serious violent offenders, very little attention has been paid to the individuals, and the individual differences, of this population. Serious violent offenders have enhanced supervision upon release, often quarantined to separate programs, given five additional years of parole (also called post-release supervision), and barred from many less punitive housing and employment prospects. This study takes a close look at five different men who have been labeled ‘seriously violent’ by New York State Corrections and Parole. Through photography and ethnography, their initial release and first few months home were documented. The purpose is to highlight the different faces of reentry and question whether reentry means the same thing to all the people coming home, or if there should be more individualized services and protocols.

2012 - International Communication Association Pages: unavailable || Words: 7251 words || 
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4. Alade, Fashina. "To Sing or Not to Sing: The Use of Musical Interstitials in Educational Television for Preschoolers" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the International Communication Association, Sheraton Phoenix Downtown, Phoenix, AZ, May 24, 2012 Online <APPLICATION/PDF>. 2020-02-22 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p550846_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: While both narrative television and music have been shown to offer educational benefits to children, there is a lack of research on the combination of music and narrative. There is also a lack of research on the effects of music on program appeal. Utilizing a between-subjects experimental design, this study evaluates whether the inclusion of musical interstitials in a narrative-based television program supports or suppresses preschoolers’ comprehension of the narrative content and program appeal. Results illustrate that children who viewed the musical interstitials understood significantly more of the central content than their peers who viewed the same episode with no musical interstitials. Trends also suggest that children in the music group enjoyed the program more than their peers in the no music group. Based on these findings, strategic use of musical interstitials in narrative programs is advised.

2014 - ISME Words: 235 words || 
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5. Gudmundsdottir, Helga. "Singing Ability of 1-3-year-olds Measured in terms of Pitch Accuracy and Singing Range" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the ISME, Pontifical Catholic University of Rio Grande do Sul, Porto Alegre, Brazil, Jul 20, 2014 <Not Available>. 2020-02-22 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p718567_index.html>
Publication Type: Spoken Paper (Abstract)
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: There are numerous reports on toddlers’ impromptu singing of standard songs and invented songs. Young children’s individual singing increases from age 1 to 3 years and during this period toddlers are known to generate large amounts of singing of various kinds. In general young children are reported to use large singing ranges in free vocal play but very narrow ranges when singing standard songs. Few studies, in recent years, have systematically collected singing from large groups of infants and toddlers.
The purpose of the present study was to develop methods for systematic collection of singing data from children 3 years and younger that would accurately estimate young children’s vocal abilities. This included singing a favorite song and learning a new song using age appropriate methods. Most of the methods tested proved successful with the 2-3-year-olds but only some of them were successful in eliciting consistent responses from 1-2-year-olds. Pitch analysis on the young children’s singing of a new song and a song of choice revealed that pitch accuracy was higher and singing range was larger than expected for this age group.
The results will be examined and put in perspective in terms of implications for research methodology and data collection with very young children. Furthermore, the issue of systematic underestimation in the research literature of young children’s singing abilities will be addressed in the context of research methodology. Implications for music education will be discussed.

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