Guest  

 
Search: 
Search By: SubjectAbstractAuthorTitleFull-Text

 

Showing 1 through 5 of 486 records.
Pages: Previous - 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 ... 98 - Next  Jump:
2016 - Association for Asian Studies - Annual Conference Words: 243 words || 
Info
1. Ho, Chi Tim. "The Singapore Story and Singapore History beyond Lee Kuan Yew" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the Association for Asian Studies - Annual Conference, Washington State Convention Center, Seattle, WA, <Not Available>. 2019-06-25 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1073420_index.html>
Publication Type: Panel Paper
Abstract: The Singapore Story is a narrative of the island nation-state’ struggle against the odds, punctuated by events and moments identified to be historically significant, e.g. the Japanese Occupation, the struggle for independence, and the struggle to make Singapore viable. The narrative it posits is moreover synonymous with the late Lee Kuan Yew’s memoirs, the first of which also entitled The Singapore Story. Since the late 1990s, the Singapore Story narrative has been reinforced by a National Education programme and commemorative events, exhibitions and publications - all picking up speed as the first generation of Singaporeans passed on. The Singapore Story has provoked counter-responses, attacking its homogeneity and “big men” perspective. Historians, scholars and activists have contributed to an extremely productive period for Singapore history. Singapore has now a broad plethora of social histories, a more nuanced political history, and new areas for further study, e.g. an “early modern” period. These have undeniably enriched Singapore history and historiography. But the laudable intent to debunk myths the Singapore Story may perpetuate, does risk becoming a blinkered approach that obstructs potentially far more rewarding historical research. Singapore and its people were, and remain, part of other historical worlds, e.g. imperial, post-colonial Southeast Asia, regional and global economies. Engaging recent representative scholarship, this paper presents possible directions to take Singapore history. It argues for a deliberate refocus on historical experiences, such as colonialism, regional and global economic activities, movement of people and ideas, and changing state-societal relations.

2012 - International Communication Association Words: 100 words || 
Info
2. Vasu, Norman. and Cheong, Damien. "Master Narratives and Governance: The Singapore Story and Governance in Singapore" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the International Communication Association, Sheraton Phoenix Downtown, Phoenix, AZ, <Not Available>. 2019-06-25 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p551730_index.html>
Publication Type: Session Paper
Abstract: The “Singapore Story”, as a master narrative, has been employed by the ruling People’s Action Party (PAP) government to legitimise a corporatist from of governance where an enlightened elite manage and extract the best from an otherwise racially and religiously fractious society. This paper argues that legitimation of corporatism through the Singapore Story is becoming increasingly challenged as the Singapore Story itself is losing what Walter Fisher would describe as narrative fidelity. Large elements of the Singapore Story has little resonance with many Singaporeans as lived reality no longer coheres with the story that attempts to make sense of it.

2007 - American Sociological Association Pages: 19 pages || Words: 7413 words || 
Info
3. Kuo, Huei-ying. "Chinese Sub-ethnic Conflicts in Nationalist Movements in Singapore and Hong Kong, 1919-1941" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Sociological Association, TBA, New York, New York City, Aug 10, 2007 Online <PDF>. 2019-06-25 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p183784_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Abstract: The paper examines the surge of Chinese nationalist movements in Hong Kong and Southeast Asia in the decades prior to and during the China-Japan War of 1931 to 1945. It extends and sharpens Benedict Anderson’s concepts of “imagined communities” and “long-distance nationalism.” Anderson argues that diaporas of the same ethnic root would identify with each other. Using a wide range of archival and documentary sources (including British colonial archives, Japanese intelligence reports, Chinese newspapers, commercial directories, and newsletters of business and native-place associations), my research however shows the tenacious growth of Chinese sub-ethnic cleavages in diasporic nationalist movements. I argue that diasporic Chinese bourgeois initiatives to organize nationalist movements invariably drew on sub-ethnic ties to mobilize support. Although these movements solicited support from the bourgeoisie through their transnational business networks, the movements were by and large operated by each major sub-ethnic group. In short, Chinese diasporic nationalism lacked the capacity to unite all sub-ethnic groups. Instead it provided the terrain for competition among sub-ethnic business networks and the political parties they supported.

2004 - International Communication Association Pages: 24 pages || Words: 6326 words || 
Info
4. Leong, Cecilia. "ICT Convergence and the Digital Divide: The Story of Malaysia and Singapore" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the International Communication Association, New Orleans Sheraton, New Orleans, LA, May 27, 2004 Online <.PDF>. 2019-06-25 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p113068_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Scholars have pointed out that three major innovations have given the impetus to an ongoing transformation of our economic and social environment. These historical and technological changes were the swing of electronic industries to digital technology, the large-scale marketing of personal computers and the advent of the Internet. These three changes interacted to produce Information Communication Technology (ICT) convergence and the evolution of industrial society towards an "information society". Cheaper transmission of information via many more communication outlets as a result of convergence will mean that ICTs will be used in increasingly many other ways by governments, commercial systems and society that had previously not been possible. So, does this mean that with advent of the age of convergence, increases in the variety of ways the same information can be access will result in the reduction of the gap in the digital divide? This paper explores the extent of convergence in Malaysia and Singapore, two countries located in South East Asia and the nature of the digital divide in both countries.

2004 - International Communication Association Pages: 29 pages || Words: 10389 words || 
Info
5. To, Yiu Ming. "What Kind of Development? Whose Asian Values? A Critique of Two Theories of Press Censorship in Singapore" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the International Communication Association, New Orleans Sheraton, New Orleans, LA, May 27, 2004 Online <.PDF>. 2019-06-25 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p112806_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Singapore has been well-known for its strict censorship against the press since the 1970s. It is done out of the authoritarian belief that the government knows better than anyone how “to advance the economic, social and cultural well-being of their peoples.” The press should be kept under the tight control of the government to serve public interest.
The appeal of Singapore's theories of censorship lies in the popular values it promotes. In particular, the generic values, such as patriotism, social harmony and economic growth, are upheld by authoritarian regimes and embedded in their policies, deserve special attention.
To these censorship claims, one may simply denounce them as violating international human rights norms. But criticisms offered by this paper take another path. It will be based on thorough discussion of both the conceptual issues involved as well as detailed analysis of the social situation in Singapore. In the following, two major theories of press censorship in Singapore, namely the development-oriented argument and the Asian values argument, will be presented and criticized. Each theory will be given a sympathetic understanding before it is subjected to critical scrutiny by looking into its theoretical shortcoming and empirical validity. It is hoped that a critique of these two arguments, based on considerate analysis of Singapore’s situation, can enhance the understanding of their fundamental weaknesses while we show our sensitivity to its cultural particularity that gives rise to these censorship claims.

Pages: Previous - 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 ... 98 - Next  Jump:

©2019 All Academic, Inc.   |   All Academic Privacy Policy