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2011 - Association for Education in Journalism and Mass Communication Pages: 24 pages || Words: 5465 words || 
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1. Fang, Ling. and Ha, Louisa. "Who are the heavy users of Social Network Sites among College Students? A Study of Social Network Sites and College Students" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the Association for Education in Journalism and Mass Communication, Renaissance Grand & Suites Hotel, St. Louis, MO, Aug 10, 2011 Online <APPLICATION/PDF>. 2020-02-24 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p520046_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: The indulgence in social networking sites (SNS) among college students has drawn scholars’ attention and research interest. But who the heavy users of SNS among college students are and how SNS use in relation to cellular phone text messaging use, another popular medium, has not been studied. Based on a survey on 476 college students from 24 classes in a public university, this study focused on sociability gratifications and information searching gratifications with behavioral indicators as predictors of SNS use and examined their relationship between SNS usage and with text messaging use. Specifically, this study examined (1) the demographic predictors of college students’ SNS usage, (2) how sociability gratifications and information seeking gratification contribute to college students’ SNS usage, and (3) the relationship between college students’ cell phone usage and SNS usage. Results show a complementary relationship between SNS use and text-messaging use. Heavy users of SNS are most likely to be females and minority students and those who relied on SNS as a news medium.

2007 - International Studies Association 48th Annual Convention Words: 100 words || 
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2. Stavrianakis, Anna. "Call to Arms: The University as a Site of Militarised Capitalism and a Site of Struggle" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the International Studies Association 48th Annual Convention, Hilton Chicago, CHICAGO, IL, USA, Feb 28, 2007 <Not Available>. 2020-02-24 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p179286_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Abstract: Student protests in the US and UK against university involvement with arms companies and military recruitment on campus raise the question of the role of the university in contemporary society. This paper discusses universities? investments in, and research and teaching partnerships with the arms industry and military as indicators of the increasing corporatisation of higher education in general and militarisation of science and engineering in particular. This trend is not unchallenged, however. Understanding universities as sites of social struggle allows us to chart and analyse the rise of student and faculty protest, and consider potential strategies for activist academic practice.

2016 - ICA's 66th Annual Conference Pages: unavailable || Words: unavailable || 
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3. Kim, Jinhee. and Hyun, Kideuk. "Political Disagreement and Ambivalence in New Information Environment: Exploring Conditional Indirect Effects of Partisan News Site Use and Discussion Network Heterogeneity on Social Network Sites on Political Participation" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the ICA's 66th Annual Conference, Hilton Fukuoka Sea Hawk, Fukuoka, Japan, Jun 09, 2016 Online <APPLICATION/PDF>. 2020-02-24 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1094618_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: This study investigates the (de)mobilizing influences of political (dis)agreement in the news and in political discussion on political attitudes and participation in new information environments. Results demonstrate the mediating functions of political ambivalence in that exposure to proattitudinal news reduces ambivalence and thereby promotes political participation, whereas exposure to counter-attitudinal news increases ambivalence and thereby discourages participation. Importantly, the effect of exposure to counter-attitudinal news on ambivalence was moderated by heterogeneity of discussion network on SNSs, such that the combination of exposure to counter-attitudinal news and to heterogeneous SNS discussion amplifies ambivalence additively, and thereby augments the tendency toward demobilization. These results are interpreted as suggesting that changing media contexts may lead to complex roles of news and political discussion.

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