Guest  

 
Search: 
Search By: SubjectAbstractAuthorTitleFull-Text

 

Showing 1 through 5 of 5 records.
2010 - Oklahoma Research Day Words: 223 words || 
Info
1. Roberts, Quinton. and Andrews, Kenneth. "Parasite Eggs and Cysts Found in the Small Intestine of the Red-Eared Slider Turtle (Trachemys scripta elegans) within Oklahoma" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the Oklahoma Research Day, Cameron University, Lawton, OK, Nov 12, 2010 <Not Available>. 2019-08-20 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p484087_index.html>
Publication Type: Abstract
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Testudines are a heavily parasitized group of pokilotherms and are commonly host to multiple parasite species infections. There is a paucity of current data on the helminth parasites of Oklahoma testudines. Much of the available data is in excess of fifty years old. Our findings will add to the information available on parasites of Oklahoma testudines. Fifty Red-Eared slider turtles (Trachemys scripta elegans) were collected in southern Oklahoma. These testudines were dissected; sex and size information recorded, and all organs were analyzed for parasites. Anatomical structures found with cysts, eggs, or embedded parasites were preserved for histological screening. These tissues included: small intestine, large intestine, stomach, kidney, bladder, heart, esophagus, lungs, liver, and spleen. Tissues were fixed in 10% formalin, and larger tissues were sectioned to less than 3cm to ensure proper processing and paraffin embedding. Sections of small intestine were examined to determine the amount of eggs and juvenile parasites were found in this nutrient rich site for parasites. Slides were stained with a standard H+E stain. Histological evaluation of slides will include locating, typing, and determining life stage of parasites. A morphological evaluation of the host tissues as well as the modification or destruction of the same tissues was performed. It is hoped that this data increased the knowledge of the life cycles of these poorly known parasites within Oklahoma.

2014 - Texas Academy of Science Annual Meeting Words: 254 words || 
Info
2. Miller, Amy., Hill, Alexandria., Plantz, Allyson. and Burks, Romi. "How Do You Like Your Eggs (and Hatchlings)? Red-eared slider turtle (Trachemys scripta elegans) predation of developing apple snails (Pomacea maculata)" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the Texas Academy of Science Annual Meeting, Texas A&M Galveston Campus, Galveston, TX, Mar 07, 2014 <Not Available>. 2019-08-20 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p728971_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Predation acts a strong driving force for community structure, especially in aquatic systems. Global transportation and anthropogenic influences impact aquatic systems by introducing exotic species. Such introductions bolster the importance of understanding predation potential of native species. Likely facilitated by the aquarium trade, one species of apple snail, Pomacea maculata (formerly P. insularum), continues to establish invasive populations along the Gulf Coast. Increasing introduction of P. maculata in the southeastern states, including Texas, makes mitigating population growth and spread of this invasive species imperative. One common strategy for reducing invasive populations involves utilizing native species that may serve as predators. Trachemys scripta elegans (red-eared slider turtles), for example, inhabit riparian zones and consume P. maculata eggs, even though these eggs contain a defensive compound. However, no information exists regarding the extent of hatchling predation by turtles. For this project, we tested how color, taste, size of prey, size of predator, and availability of eggs versus hatchlings (n= 10) influenced consumption by turtles with a series of non-choice consumption experiments. With an overall average consumption of about 40%, the turtles did not distinguish between resources given a variety of treatments. We speculate that the defensive compounds in eggs, and perhaps hatchlings, reduce predation but fail to eliminate it. Therefore, it remains unlikely that these native turtles could prevent or control populations of P. maculata in Texas. To better combat this species, we recommend that the public continue to look for ways to remove eggs physically at the first sign of invasion.

2018 - American Sociological Association Annual Meeting Pages: unavailable || Words: 5635 words || 
Info
3. Ingraham, Natalie. "Wider Slider Bars: Navigating Sexuality for Older Queer Women in the Bay Area of California" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Sociological Association Annual Meeting, Pennsylvania Convention Center & Philadelphia Marriott, Philadelphia, PA, Aug 09, 2018 Online <PDF>. 2019-08-20 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1377167_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Research has shown that queer (lesbian and bisexual) women, specifically lesbians, experience more body satisfaction and less drive for thinness than most heterosexual women. However, most research on older queer women has been focused exclusively on body image rather its intersections with sexuality and has also been primarily conducted with White women. This study sought to fill those gaps by exploring what queer women of size over age 40 think about their bodies and their embodied sexualities in particular. It also asks what community, cultural and medical norms may influence these perceptions. Drawing participants from a larger health program study, 28 qualitative, in-depth interviews were conducted from 2014-2015 with cisgender women over age 40 who identified as lesbian, bisexual, or queer. The sample of women was more diverse than previous studies in terms of race (53% White, 47% women of color) with a median age of 53 (range 43-70). Participants described the push and pull of body size norms with the lesbian community specifically. While community norms dictated increased acceptance of larger body size, broader social norms and shifting health realities of aging made women desire and pursue smaller bodies for themselves and for their romantic partners. This push and pull may indicate a shift in queer women’s culture away from blanket body size acceptance and the protections of body size norms described in previous work on this community.


©2019 All Academic, Inc.   |   All Academic Privacy Policy