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2015 - American Society of Criminology – 71st Annual Meeting Words: 117 words || 
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1. Yu, Shaohua. "The Effects of Anti-Smoking Messages from Family, School, and Mass Media on Smoking Behavior and Smoking Intention among Chinese Adolescents" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Society of Criminology – 71st Annual Meeting, Washington Hilton, Washington, DC, Nov 18, 2015 <Not Available>. 2019-09-15 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1026430_index.html>
Publication Type: Individual Paper
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: The prevalence of adolescent smoking has been increasing rapidly in China. Expanding adolescent exposure to anti-smoking messages may be an effective approach to prevent tobacco use among this population. Using a cross-sectional sample of 8,444 high school students in four Chinese cities, this study assessed the relationship between self-reported exposure to anti- smoking messages from families, schools, and mass media and the rate of past 30-day smoking and smoking intention among junior and senior high school students. Results from logistic regression suggested that anti-smoking messages delivered via school and media inhibited both tobacco use and the intention to smoke. The effects of familial warnings about harmful effects of smoking, on the other hand, were at best insignificant.

2010 - NCA 96th Annual Convention Pages: unavailable || Words: 10060 words || 
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2. Phua, Joe. "9. College Students and Smoking: How their Attitudes towards Smoking and Smoking Behavior are influenced by Social Identification with Close Friends, College Peers and Family Members" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the NCA 96th Annual Convention, Hilton San Francisco, San Francisco, CA, Nov 13, 2010 Online <PDF>. 2019-09-15 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p419668_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: This study examined how college students’ identification with close friends, college peers and family members influence their attitude towards smoking. Results (N=227) indicated that identification with each group moderated the effect of both injunctive and descriptive norms on attitude towards smoking, with injunctive norms having a stronger effect overall. Further, injunctive norms of college peers, and descriptive norms of close friends, had the strongest effect. Positive attitude towards smoking was significantly associated with smoking behavior.

2004 - American Sociological Association Pages: 22 pages || Words: 8683 words || 
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3. Asbridge, Mark. "Ethno-Specific Patterns of Adolescent Smoking: The Mediating Effects of Acculturation, Peer Smoking, and Sibling Smoking" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Sociological Association, Hilton San Francisco & Renaissance Parc 55 Hotel, San Francisco, CA,, Aug 14, 2004 Online <.PDF>. 2019-09-15 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p109374_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Employing a multi-ethnic sample of 3,400 Toronto high school students, this paper explores the relationship between ethnic identity and tobacco use. Additionally, four measures drawn from social learning theory, including peer and sibling smoking and two measures of acculturation, are included to investigate their mediating effects on adolescent smoking. Logistic regression results indicate that tobacco use varies considerably among adolescents of differing ethnic identities. Adolescents of European decent are considerably more likely than other youth to smoke, while Chinese, South Asian and East Indian, and West Indian youth are less inclined to smoke relative to adolescents from other ethnic backgrounds. Mediator model results demonstrate that adolescents who have peers and siblings who smoke have a considerably greater risk of smoking, whereas young people resist acculturation have a lowered smoking risk. Growing up in Canada increases an adolescents risk of smoking. Upon closer inspection, it is clear that peer and sibling smoking and acculturation mediates smoking among only a handful of ethnic groups, namely Western and Southern European youth, and adolescents who identity as South Asian and East Indian. Meanwhile, Eastern European, Chinese, and West Indian youth continue to exhibit distinct smoking patterns despite the presence of mediating influences.

2015 - DSI Annual Meeting Pages: unavailable || Words: unavailable || 
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4. Scott, Rebecca., Prybutok, Gayle. and Prybutok, Victor. "Demographics and Smoking on a Smoke Free Campus" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the DSI Annual Meeting, Sheraton Seattle Hotel, Seattle, Washington, Nov 21, 2015 Online <PDF>. 2019-09-15 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1041748_index.html>
Publication Type: Invited Paper
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: We examine the association between demographics and smoking on a smoke free campus for non-smokers, occasional smokers, and smokers. A survey was conducted that allowed running the Chi-square analysis. The results provide insights on how to best achieve compliance among all groups.

2016 - ICA's 66th Annual Conference Pages: unavailable || Words: unavailable || 
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5. Zhou, Chun. "Effects From Smoking-Related Media Messages on Chinese Adolescent Smoking: Testing the Mediating Role of Perceived Descriptive Peer Norm" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the ICA's 66th Annual Conference, Hilton Fukuoka Sea Hawk, Fukuoka, Japan, Jun 09, 2016 Online <APPLICATION/PDF>. 2019-09-15 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1107103_index.html>
Publication Type: Work in Progress
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: This study (1) investigates effects from smoking-related media messages on Chinese adolescents smoking intention; and (2) tests the mediation role of perceived descriptive peer norm, that is, perceived prevalence of smoking among peers in such media message effects. Three types of smoking-related media messages were examined: anti-smoking messages, cigarette promotion messages, and smoking scenes in movies and TV programs. Hierarchical logistic regression showed that adolescents who saw more anti-smoking messages were 27% less likely to intend to smoke, while adolescents who were exposed to cigarette promotion messages or smoking scenes were 47% and 19% more likely to intend to smoke respectively. Mediation analysis showed that perceived descriptive peer norm significantly mediated the relationship between each of the smoking-related messages and adolescent smoking intentions. As a result, future youth smoking prevention program in China should aim to decrease such perceived descriptive peer norm.

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