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2010 - NCA 96th Annual Convention Pages: unavailable || Words: 10060 words || 
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1. Phua, Joe. "9. College Students and Smoking: How their Attitudes towards Smoking and Smoking Behavior are influenced by Social Identification with Close Friends, College Peers and Family Members" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the NCA 96th Annual Convention, Hilton San Francisco, San Francisco, CA, Nov 13, 2010 Online <PDF>. 2019-06-25 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p419668_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: This study examined how college students’ identification with close friends, college peers and family members influence their attitude towards smoking. Results (N=227) indicated that identification with each group moderated the effect of both injunctive and descriptive norms on attitude towards smoking, with injunctive norms having a stronger effect overall. Further, injunctive norms of college peers, and descriptive norms of close friends, had the strongest effect. Positive attitude towards smoking was significantly associated with smoking behavior.

2015 - American Society of Criminology – 71st Annual Meeting Words: 117 words || 
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2. Yu, Shaohua. "The Effects of Anti-Smoking Messages from Family, School, and Mass Media on Smoking Behavior and Smoking Intention among Chinese Adolescents" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Society of Criminology – 71st Annual Meeting, Washington Hilton, Washington, DC, Nov 18, 2015 <Not Available>. 2019-06-25 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1026430_index.html>
Publication Type: Individual Paper
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: The prevalence of adolescent smoking has been increasing rapidly in China. Expanding adolescent exposure to anti-smoking messages may be an effective approach to prevent tobacco use among this population. Using a cross-sectional sample of 8,444 high school students in four Chinese cities, this study assessed the relationship between self-reported exposure to anti- smoking messages from families, schools, and mass media and the rate of past 30-day smoking and smoking intention among junior and senior high school students. Results from logistic regression suggested that anti-smoking messages delivered via school and media inhibited both tobacco use and the intention to smoke. The effects of familial warnings about harmful effects of smoking, on the other hand, were at best insignificant.

2004 - American Sociological Association Pages: 22 pages || Words: 8683 words || 
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3. Asbridge, Mark. "Ethno-Specific Patterns of Adolescent Smoking: The Mediating Effects of Acculturation, Peer Smoking, and Sibling Smoking" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Sociological Association, Hilton San Francisco & Renaissance Parc 55 Hotel, San Francisco, CA,, Aug 14, 2004 Online <.PDF>. 2019-06-25 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p109374_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Employing a multi-ethnic sample of 3,400 Toronto high school students, this paper explores the relationship between ethnic identity and tobacco use. Additionally, four measures drawn from social learning theory, including peer and sibling smoking and two measures of acculturation, are included to investigate their mediating effects on adolescent smoking. Logistic regression results indicate that tobacco use varies considerably among adolescents of differing ethnic identities. Adolescents of European decent are considerably more likely than other youth to smoke, while Chinese, South Asian and East Indian, and West Indian youth are less inclined to smoke relative to adolescents from other ethnic backgrounds. Mediator model results demonstrate that adolescents who have peers and siblings who smoke have a considerably greater risk of smoking, whereas young people resist acculturation have a lowered smoking risk. Growing up in Canada increases an adolescents risk of smoking. Upon closer inspection, it is clear that peer and sibling smoking and acculturation mediates smoking among only a handful of ethnic groups, namely Western and Southern European youth, and adolescents who identity as South Asian and East Indian. Meanwhile, Eastern European, Chinese, and West Indian youth continue to exhibit distinct smoking patterns despite the presence of mediating influences.

2010 - ISPP 33rd Annual Scientific Meeting Words: 169 words || 
Info
4. Wood, Caroline. and Noor, Masi. "The Psychology and Politics of Smoking: The Impact of Fear, Hypocrisy and Processing Mode on Intentions to Quit Smoking" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the ISPP 33rd Annual Scientific Meeting, Mark Hopkins Hotel, San Francisco, California, USA, Jul 07, 2010 <Not Available>. 2019-06-25 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p419692_index.html>
Publication Type: Paper (prepared oral presentation)
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Anti-Smoking Campaigns in the United Kingdom and across Europe have recently relied on Fear to motivate people to quit smoking. These are most commonly conveyed to the general public via pictures showing the gruesome consequences of smoking, usually presented on the cigarette packet. The question that the present research addresses is whether these scare tactics are effective in encouraging smokers to change their smoking habits?
Two experiments (N=160, N=100) were conducted to examine the role of fear, both on its own and in interaction with how smokers process information and deal with hypocrisy-induced dissonance, on intentions to quit smoking. Despite the successful manipulation of these factors, results yielded little support for the effects of fear on smoking intentions, both cross-sectionally and longitudinally. In order to shed light on these results, qualitative data were collected from smokers that highlighted how and why smoking behaviour is maintained and also key characteristics which would ultimately replace it.
Overall results are discussed in terms of their political, psychological and financial implications for smoking campaigns.

2014 - Pacific Sociological Association Annual Meeting Words: 125 words || 
Info
5. Woo, Juhee. "Gender Differences in Cigarette Smoking: the Relationship between Social Perceptions of Cigarette Smokers and Smoking Prevalene" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the Pacific Sociological Association Annual Meeting, Marriott Downtown Waterfront, Portland, Oregon, Mar 27, 2014 <Not Available>. 2019-06-25 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p706186_index.html>
Publication Type: Formal research paper presentation
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: This research is a descriptive study of gender differences in cigarette smoking. By comparing U.S college students with Korean college students, the researcher seeks to examine if there is a relationship between the extent of gender difference in social perceptions of cigarette smokers and the extent of gender difference in smoking prevalence. Results show that female smokers are more negatively evaluated than male smokers in both countries but the gender differences are greater in the Korean sample than the U.S sample. Likewise, the gender differences in smoking prevalence are greater in the Korean sample than the U.S sample. Consequently, this study finds a relationship between the extent of gender difference in social perceptions of cigarette smokers and the extent of gender difference in smoking prevalence.

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