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Showing 1 through 5 of 5 records.
2011 - Oklahoma Research Day Words: 235 words || 
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1. Wheeler, Tanner., Graham, Melanie., Guthmueller, Kassandra., Yoder, Maggie., Fischer, Carissa., Holgado, Andrea., Seals, LaKesha. and Edwards, Angela. "VSM-1 is a SNARE Interacting Protein That Regulates Synapse Formation" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the Oklahoma Research Day, Cameron University, Lawton, OK, Nov 04, 2011 <Not Available>. 2018-04-25 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p546240_index.html>
Publication Type: Abstract
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Fusion of membrane-bound organelles with the plasma membrane is accomplished by the formation of SNARE complexes. VSM-1 is a SNARE interacting protein that acts as a SNARE regulator, preventing the formation of SNARE complexes during membrane fusion. Work reported by Gerst and collaborators have shown that yeast syntaxin and synaptobrevin bind to VSM-1 in a phosphorylation dependent manner. This process resulted in the inhibition of exocytosis at the vesicular priming step. To advance our knowledge on the regulation of intracellular membrane trafficking underlying synapse formation, we began characterizing the functional role of VSM-1 in the genetic model organism C. elegans. First, we determined that endogenous VSM-1 is expressed in nematodes and enriched at synapses. Second, the phenotype of a vsm-1 mutant isolated by the Oklahoma Genome Consortium was characterized using various assays. For instance, pharmacological assays showed that vsm-1 mutants have an enhanced sensitivity to “Aldicarb,” a cholinesterase inhibitor. This phenotype can be interpreted as a consequence of increased neurotransmitter release in the mutant background and/or greater synaptic connectivity. Third, imaging analysis focusing on neuromuscular junctions showed that mutants lacking a normal VSM-1 protein have a greater density of synaptic varicosities when compared to wild-type nematodes. Lastly, studies underlying the role of synaptic density on learning and memory are underway. In summary, our studies show that C.elegans VSM-1 is enriched at neuromuscular junctions and seems to regulate synaptic signaling by promoting synapse formation.

2012 - ASC Annual Meeting Words: 198 words || 
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2. Widdowson, Alex. "An Empirical Examination of Moffitt’s “Snares” Hypothesis" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the ASC Annual Meeting, Palmer House Hilton, Chicago, IL, Nov 14, 2012 <Not Available>. 2018-04-25 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p577704_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Moffitt and her colleagues (1996) argue that underlying the age-crime curve are two qualitatively distinct groups of offenders – life-course persistent (LCP) and adolescence-onset (AO) offenders – each with their own unique natural history and etiology. LCPs are said to begin antisocial behavior in early childhood and continue this behavior across the life-course. In contrast, AOs begin antisocial behavior in adolescence yet desist from criminal behavior in early adulthood. Moffitt explains, however, that some AOs may not desist from crime in the expected way. Experiences such as – “teenaged parenthood, addiction to drugs or alcohol, school dropout, disabling or disfiguring injuries, patchy work histories, and time spent incarcerated” – may ensnare AO youth into a further life of criminal and antisocial behavior (Moffitt, 1993: 684). Prior research has found support for this hypothesis (e.g., Hussong, et al., 2004), yet no study has examined all of the “snares” outlined by Moffitt (1993) in one paper. Using data from a national sample of U.S. youth followed over 13 years, this study investigates AO persistent patterns of criminal behavior and whether this relationship depends on AO youth encountering one or more of the “snares” proposed by Moffitt.

2008 - ASC Annual Meeting Words: 153 words || 
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3. McGee, Tara., Hayatbakhsh, Mohammad., Bor, William., Aird, Rosemary. and Najman, Jake. "The Impact of Snares on Adolescence-limited Antisocial Behavior: A Test of Moffitt’s Developmental Taxonomy" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the ASC Annual Meeting, St. Louis Adam's Mark, St. Louis, Missouri, Nov 12, 2008 <Not Available>. 2018-04-25 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p270210_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Abstract: Moffitt’s dual typology of life-course persistent and adolescence-limited offending has been tested in the empirical literature. By comparison, the extent to which the antisocial behavior of adolescence-limited individuals is truly constrained to adolescence is relatively under-examined. Using data from the Australian Mater-University Study of Pregnancy and its Outcomes (MUSP), we explore Moffitt’s concept of snares. The MUSP is a longitudinal study of mother-child pairs from the pre-natal stage to 21 years of age. Snares are those factors that may lead to an adolescent becoming ensnared in an antisocial lifestyle. Factors explored include: drug disorder, becoming a parent, educational failure and contact with the criminal justice system. We found that one third of those individuals identified as having adolescence-limited antisocial behavior using Moffitt’s typology, persisted with this antisocial behavior as young adults. This continuity can in part be explained by snares. Implications of this finding for Moffitt’s theory and broader policy implications are discussed.

2011 - Oklahoma Research Day Words: 205 words || 
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4. Foutch, Mandi., Wheeler, Tanner., Bernhardt, Nathan., Seals, LaKesha. and Holgado, Andrea. "Using SNARE Proteins to Determine the Target Binding Partners of VSM-1" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the Oklahoma Research Day, Cameron University, Lawton, OK, Nov 04, 2011 <Not Available>. 2018-04-25 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p547813_index.html>
Publication Type: Abstract
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: VSM-1 (v-SNARE Master Protein 1) is thought to be an exocytosis regulating protein found in yeast and higher organisms. Studies from yeast have shown that VSM-1 partially inhibits constitutive exocytosis and the release of proteins into the extracellular milieu. Mechanistically, it was suggested that VSM-1 inhibits constitutive exocytosis by preventing SNARE complex formation. Thus, we hypothesize that VSM-1 may play a central role at the synapse regulating calcium mediated exocytosis and neurotransmitter release. Specifically we postulate that VSM-1 mode of action in neurons is to prevent neurotransmitter release by disrupting the formation of SNARE (soluble N-ethylaleimide-sensitive factor attachment protein receptor) complexes. To test this hypothesis, we propose to investigate whether VSM-1 interacts with SNARE proteins in vitro and which are the consequences of such interactions. First, we induce the expression of tagged recombinant proteins for VSM-1, SNARE domains of synaptobrevin (SNB-1, a v-SNARE), syntaxin 1A (UNC 64, a t-SNARE), and the two SNAP 25 SNARE domains (RIC 4A and RIC 4B, t-SNARE). Next, we purify proteins of interest using glutathione and cobalt resins. Last, we perform in vitro binding assays and competition assays using affinity purified polypeptides. Binding results will be analyzed using SDS-PAGE and gel densitometry.

2015 - SRCD Biennial Meeting Words: 497 words || 
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5. Franken, Aart., Harakeh, Zeena., Dijkstra, Jan., Veenstra, Rene. and Vollebergh, Wilma. "Peer Perception of Adolescents with an Early Onset of Antisocial Behavior: The SNARE study" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the SRCD Biennial Meeting, Pennsylvania Convention Center and the Philadelphia Marriott Downtown Hotel, Philadelphia, PA, Mar 19, 2015 <Not Available>. 2018-04-25 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p957196_index.html>
Publication Type: Individual Poster
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: According to the dual-taxonomy model (Moffitt, 1993) adolescents with an early onset of antisocial behavior become popular role models during adolescence as their peers want to copy their risk behavior to overcome the maturity gap. Adolescents experience the maturity gap when they feel biologically mature, but society does not give them mature rights and responsibilities. To them, risk behavior becomes attractive because it helps decrease the maturity gap; it symbolizes autonomy and maturity. The current study aimed to examine the social status (popularity, social dominance, acceptance), and other relevant characteristics (audaciousness towards teachers, perceived maturity, relationship quality, and peer-valued characteristics) of adolescents with an early onset of antisocial behavior.
We used cross-sectional data from the SNARE-study (Social Network Analysis of Risk behavior in Early adolescence; N = 1114, M Age = 12.5 years, 50% boys), from the first year of two secondary schools in the Netherlands. Adolescents with a profile of early onset antisocial behavior were identified using a confirmatory latent class analysis based on self- and elementary school teacher reported antisocial behavior. To support our claim that we identified early onset adolescents, as they are characterized by a risk profile, we compared them to their peers using bivariate logistic regression analyses on (adolescent reported) parenting characteristics and self-control. Peer nominations were used to assess risk behavior, social status, and other variables associated with early onset antisocial behavior (audaciousness towards teachers, perceived maturity, relationship quality, and peer-valued characteristics), to investigate how peers perceive adolescents with an early onset of risk behavior. Adolescents with a profile of early onset antisocial behavior were compared to their peers on these peer nominations using bivariate and multivariate logistic regression analyses.
We identified a small group (8.3%) of adolescents with a profile of early onset antisocial behavior, who were characterized by poorer parenting (smoking parents, less rules, less support, and less monitoring), and lower self-control for boys. Furthermore, compared to their peers, early onset adolescents were more popular, socially dominant, rejected, acted more audacious towards teachers, and were less likely to give good advice. Both groups had equally many friends, were perceived as equally mature, and did not differ on peer-valued characteristics. After controlling for peer valued characteristics, and for rejection, adolescents with an early onset of antisocial behavior were still more popular than their peers.
In line with the dual-taxonomy model, early onset adolescents were seen as popular and socially dominant, indicating they may be seen as popular role models during adolescence. However, they were also more disliked; perhaps because they might not have the social skills some of their peers possess, as they experienced a more problematic upbringing. In line with expectations based on the maturity gap, early onset adolescents were more likely to defy authority figures. However, they were not more likely to be seen as mature. It might be that being perceived as a popular role model and being perceived mature are two different concepts during early adolescence. The influence of early onset adolescents should be investigated in future studies.


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