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2011 - Oklahoma Research Day Words: 235 words || 
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1. Wheeler, Tanner., Graham, Melanie., Guthmueller, Kassandra., Yoder, Maggie., Fischer, Carissa., Holgado, Andrea., Seals, LaKesha. and Edwards, Angela. "VSM-1 is a SNARE Interacting Protein That Regulates Synapse Formation" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the Oklahoma Research Day, Cameron University, Lawton, OK, Nov 04, 2011 <Not Available>. 2018-12-12 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p546240_index.html>
Publication Type: Abstract
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Fusion of membrane-bound organelles with the plasma membrane is accomplished by the formation of SNARE complexes. VSM-1 is a SNARE interacting protein that acts as a SNARE regulator, preventing the formation of SNARE complexes during membrane fusion. Work reported by Gerst and collaborators have shown that yeast syntaxin and synaptobrevin bind to VSM-1 in a phosphorylation dependent manner. This process resulted in the inhibition of exocytosis at the vesicular priming step. To advance our knowledge on the regulation of intracellular membrane trafficking underlying synapse formation, we began characterizing the functional role of VSM-1 in the genetic model organism C. elegans. First, we determined that endogenous VSM-1 is expressed in nematodes and enriched at synapses. Second, the phenotype of a vsm-1 mutant isolated by the Oklahoma Genome Consortium was characterized using various assays. For instance, pharmacological assays showed that vsm-1 mutants have an enhanced sensitivity to “Aldicarb,” a cholinesterase inhibitor. This phenotype can be interpreted as a consequence of increased neurotransmitter release in the mutant background and/or greater synaptic connectivity. Third, imaging analysis focusing on neuromuscular junctions showed that mutants lacking a normal VSM-1 protein have a greater density of synaptic varicosities when compared to wild-type nematodes. Lastly, studies underlying the role of synaptic density on learning and memory are underway. In summary, our studies show that C.elegans VSM-1 is enriched at neuromuscular junctions and seems to regulate synaptic signaling by promoting synapse formation.

2012 - ASC Annual Meeting Words: 198 words || 
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2. Widdowson, Alex. "An Empirical Examination of Moffitt’s “Snares” Hypothesis" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the ASC Annual Meeting, Palmer House Hilton, Chicago, IL, Nov 14, 2012 <Not Available>. 2018-12-12 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p577704_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Moffitt and her colleagues (1996) argue that underlying the age-crime curve are two qualitatively distinct groups of offenders – life-course persistent (LCP) and adolescence-onset (AO) offenders – each with their own unique natural history and etiology. LCPs are said to begin antisocial behavior in early childhood and continue this behavior across the life-course. In contrast, AOs begin antisocial behavior in adolescence yet desist from criminal behavior in early adulthood. Moffitt explains, however, that some AOs may not desist from crime in the expected way. Experiences such as – “teenaged parenthood, addiction to drugs or alcohol, school dropout, disabling or disfiguring injuries, patchy work histories, and time spent incarcerated” – may ensnare AO youth into a further life of criminal and antisocial behavior (Moffitt, 1993: 684). Prior research has found support for this hypothesis (e.g., Hussong, et al., 2004), yet no study has examined all of the “snares” outlined by Moffitt (1993) in one paper. Using data from a national sample of U.S. youth followed over 13 years, this study investigates AO persistent patterns of criminal behavior and whether this relationship depends on AO youth encountering one or more of the “snares” proposed by Moffitt.

2018 - ICA's 68th Annual Conference Words: 169 words || 
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3. Bolz, Lisa. "Press History in the Digital Age: Tightrop Walk Between Scope and Snare" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the ICA's 68th Annual Conference, Hilton Prague, Prague, Czech Republic, <Not Available>. 2018-12-12 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1364856_index.html>
Publication Type: Session Paper
Abstract: Digital technology holds tremendous promises for doing press history, but the potentials should not undermine the caution that is needed when handling digital methods in this field. I will illustrate the close entanglement of potentials and perils of digital press history.
1. Digitized old newspapers allow to explore press history in a wide scale and from afar. Logics of digitization-projects however may result in digitally available sources not being the most significant ones, yet cause bias towards them being used. 2. Digital methods impact how we perceive newspapers, as digital approaches invite to give more importance to the actual texts than to the contexts of journalism. 3. Digital methods of distant reading have their peculiar flaws. OCR-errors are obvious examples for how analysis can be misled. Yet, perfect OCR does not prevent that different nuances and styles in journalism might be misread, as these kinds of details still require close reading.

Lisa Bolz is a PhD student completing a work on digital press history at Stanford University and the Sorbonne/Paris

2008 - ASC Annual Meeting Words: 153 words || 
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4. McGee, Tara., Hayatbakhsh, Mohammad., Bor, William., Aird, Rosemary. and Najman, Jake. "The Impact of Snares on Adolescence-limited Antisocial Behavior: A Test of Moffitt’s Developmental Taxonomy" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the ASC Annual Meeting, St. Louis Adam's Mark, St. Louis, Missouri, Nov 12, 2008 <Not Available>. 2018-12-12 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p270210_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Abstract: Moffitt’s dual typology of life-course persistent and adolescence-limited offending has been tested in the empirical literature. By comparison, the extent to which the antisocial behavior of adolescence-limited individuals is truly constrained to adolescence is relatively under-examined. Using data from the Australian Mater-University Study of Pregnancy and its Outcomes (MUSP), we explore Moffitt’s concept of snares. The MUSP is a longitudinal study of mother-child pairs from the pre-natal stage to 21 years of age. Snares are those factors that may lead to an adolescent becoming ensnared in an antisocial lifestyle. Factors explored include: drug disorder, becoming a parent, educational failure and contact with the criminal justice system. We found that one third of those individuals identified as having adolescence-limited antisocial behavior using Moffitt’s typology, persisted with this antisocial behavior as young adults. This continuity can in part be explained by snares. Implications of this finding for Moffitt’s theory and broader policy implications are discussed.

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