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2012 - International Communication Association Pages: unavailable || Words: 11034 words || 
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1. Phua, Joe. "The Social Groups Approach to Quitting Smoking: An Examination of Smoking Cessation in Social Networking Sites through the Influence of Social Norms, Social Identification, Social Capital, and Social Support" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the International Communication Association, Sheraton Phoenix Downtown, Phoenix, AZ, May 24, 2012 Online <APPLICATION/PDF>. 2018-09-25 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p549119_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: This study examined members of online health social networking sites for smoking cessation, hypothesizing that four social variables: social identification (Tajfel & Turner, 1986), bridging and bonding social capital (Putnam, 2000; Williams, 2006), social norms (Perkins & Berkowitz, 1986) and social support (Sarason & Sarason, 2006), would impact the relationship between participation level and smoking cessation self-efficacy. Results of an online questionnaire (N=208) found that participation on the sites significantly impacted the four social variables, which in turned influenced smoking cessation self-efficacy. Social identification and social support also mediated the relationship between participation level and smoking cessation self-efficacy. The study also proposed a model for the use of health-based SNSs for smoking cessation, the “Social Groups Approach to Smoking Cessation,” by applying and extending traditional theories of peer influence, which was tested and supported. Implications for future research on theory-based interventions of smoking cessation using online social influences are discussed.

2015 - International Communication Association 65th Annual Conference Pages: unavailable || Words: 8278 words || 
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2. Kramer, Nicole., Winter, Stephan., Benninghoff, Brenda. and Gallus, Christine. "How "Social" is Social TV? The Influence of Social Motives and Expected Outcomes on the Usage of Social TV Applications" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the International Communication Association 65th Annual Conference, Caribe Hilton, San Juan, Puerto Rico, May 21, 2015 Online <APPLICATION/PDF>. 2018-09-25 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p986245_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Social TV applications have become increasingly popular. Building on first results on motives for usage, we aim to provide a comprehensive overview of factors that influence the likelihood of using Social TV applications. A special focus lay on the identification of the relative impact of social variables such as social motives as well as expected social outcomes in the sense of social gratifications. An online survey of Social TV users (N = 101) demonstrated that frequency of Social TV usage is not predicted by socio-demographic variables like gender and age, nor by personality aspects like extraversion or need to belong. However, the motives to communicate with others, to inform oneself and to be entertained as well as the perceived social gratification of increased enjoyment were influential. When predicting usage frequency of specific platforms such as Twitter and WhatsApp, however, different patterns emerge. While WhatApp usage is predicted first and foremost by the need to belong, Twitter usage is influenced by the motive to receive information and to communicate.

2006 - American Historical Association Words: 243 words || 
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3. Vogt, Stefan. "Nationalist Socialism and Social Democracy. The Junge Rechte in Weimar Social Democracy and the Rise of National Socialism." Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Historical Association, <Not Available>. 2018-09-25 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p27392_index.html>
Publication Type: Poster
Abstract: During the Weimar Republic, a group of young Social Democrats developed an ideology that combined elements of both National Socialism and militant anti-Fascism. This "Junge Rechte" ("Young Right") attempted simultaneously both to reform social democratic thought and politics by modifying them in accordance with nationalist, authoritarian, and anti-rationalist tendencies and to combat National Socialism. While advocating a militant strategy against the Nazis and assuming leading positions in the anti-Nazi underground, these Social Democrats also shared the basic convictions of neo-conservative, fascist and even national socialist ideologies. The proposed paper will investigate this contradiction by analyzing the ideology of the Junge Rechte in relationship to the development of socialist and nationalist thought in Germany. It questions the conventional historiographical interpretation that the group’s ideas offered a last chance to safeguard democracy and that it was a forerunner of the post-war modernization of German Social Democracy. Instead, this paper argues that the Junge Rechte must be interpreted as the product of the intellectual crisis in early and mid-twentieth-century Europe. Despite their conviction that they were defending democracy and fighting against National Socialism, the Junge Rechte actually helped pave way for the destruction of liberal political thought and democracy in Germany. The group’s ideology suggests that liberalism and democracy were not only threatened by radicalism from outside the constitutional consensus of the Weimar Republic, but also jeopardized from within. It thus illustrates the ambiguity and fragility of democratic traditions and of the ideas of the Enlightenment.

2006 - American Society of Criminology (ASC) Words: 212 words || 
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4. Verrill, Stephen. "Social Structure and Social Learning in Delinquency: A Partial Test of Akers’ Social Structure-Social Learning Model" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Society of Criminology (ASC), Los Angeles Convention Center, Los Angeles, CA, Oct 31, 2006 <Not Available>. 2018-09-25 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p155737_index.html>
Publication Type: Poster
Abstract: Social learning theory is an established general theory of criminal, deviant, and conforming behavior that finds substantial empirical support. Although the theory provides insight into the processes that influence criminal behavior, the theory does not speak to the environments that produce such behavior—the domain of structural theories. Akers has suggested that social learning theory accounts for differences in crime rates through its mediation of structural effects on individual criminal behavior. He postulated that social structure acts as the distal cause of crime, affecting an individual’s exposure to norm and norm-violating contingencies through the social learning process. Although the integrated cross-level social structure-social learning theory has received empirical attention, criminologists have not adequately tested the model. The present research contributes to the theoretical body of literature through its more complete measurement of the macrosocial correlates and theoretically defined structural causes dimensions posited by Akers. The present study tests social structure-social learning hypotheses on data obtained from a sample of high school students that was merged with U.S. Census block group data (N=1062). Although finding a relationship between social structure and social learning, the study finds no support for Akers’ use of the mediation descriptor. Instead, the present research finds support for several moderator hypotheses, concluding that the social structure-social learning statement requires modification.

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