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2016 - American Political Science Association Annual Meeting Words: 250 words || 
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1. Zhang, Youyi. and Yao, Ying. "Civil Society in Fragmented Societies: Analysis of Non-Burman CSOs in Myanmar" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Political Science Association Annual Meeting, TBA, Philadelphia, PA, Sep 01, 2016 <Not Available>. 2019-01-21 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1127315_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: There is a growing literature on civil society in ethnic divided states, and scholars debate whether civil society organizations (CSOs) increase or decrease ethnic fragmentation, particularly in periods of political changes. In this article we ask how autocrats manage ethnic minority CSOs: are autocrats more likely to give space for ethnic minority CSOs as they pose less challenges to autocratic rule than majority group CSOs with broader support, or they are harsher to ethnic minority CSOs, so as to maintain national unification and appease rising nationalism from dominant groups?

To answer this question, this article starts with the Myanmar case. In recent years, the non-Burman CSOs in government-controlled region have emerged yet remained understudied. This article begins with an introduction to current development stage of non-Burman CSOs, then compares Myanmar government’s attitude towards non-Burman CSOs and Burman CSOs both before and after the launch of political liberalization in 2010. In particular, we focus on Myanmar government’s attitude towards non-Burman CSOs in the following areas: number and size, geographical distribution, access to funding from co-ethnics and international organizations, as well as issue areas allowed to cover. Moreover, rather than regarding Myanmar government as an unitary actor, we examine subnational variations in local governments policies towards non-Burman CSOs.

The main argument in the article is that autocrats concerns over state-building and regime security shape their concerns over ethnic minority CSOs. This article ends with discussion on possible generalization into other competitive authoritarian, multi-ethnic states in Southeast Asia, including Indonesia and Malaysia.

2004 - American Sociological Association Pages: 22 pages || Words: 6836 words || 
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2. Peters, Bernhard. "All that is Solid Melts into Air -- Or Maybe Not? The Fate of "Societies" in the Era of "World Society"" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Sociological Association, Hilton San Francisco & Renaissance Parc 55 Hotel, San Francisco, CA,, Aug 14, 2004 Online <.PDF>. 2019-01-21 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p109253_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: In social theory, not least of the European variety, we find the notion that the classical concept of “societies” (in the plural) should be replaced by the concept of “world society”. “Methodological nationalism” is out. The “x society” (where x stands for a country variable: American, French, Germany) is a parochial concept, smacking of Parsonianism or modernization theory with all its well known sins. Transnationalism is in. Global perspectives are in. The paper argues that these juxtapositions beg very important questions. It argues that “societies” are still real and important entities, and that the classical notion of “a” society is still analytically useful. Empirically there are many indications that national boundaries still matter, not only in the political realm. And the concept of “a” society directs attention to important aspects of social integration and possible synergies as well as frictions between different parts of a social whole. “Integration”, however, is another suspicious term. But it can be reformulated as differentiated analytical tool, thereby providing a theoretical perspective on some basic questions about social order and disorder.

2005 - Southern Political Science Association Pages: 12 pages || Words: 3734 words || 
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3. Friedman, Douglas. "Civil society in Cuba: Competing Visions of the Good Society" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the Southern Political Science Association, Inter-Continental Hotel, New Orleans, LA, Jan 06, 2005 <Not Available>. 2019-01-21 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p66937_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed

2009 - Midwest Political Science Association 67th Annual National Conference Words: 166 words || 
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4. Garcia Iragorri, Alexandra. and Obregon, Rafael. "THE ROLE OF MEDIA FRAMING IN STRENGTHENING DEMOCRACY AND CIVIL SOCIETY ORGANIZATIONS: AN ANALYSIS OF PUBLIC DISCOURSES ON DENSITY AND ABILITY OF CIVIL SOCIETY GROUPS" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the Midwest Political Science Association 67th Annual National Conference, The Palmer House Hilton, Chicago, IL, <Not Available>. 2019-01-21 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p361664_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Abstract: Democratic consolidation has been linked to the construction of a strong civil society. New studies suggest that when dealing with civil society it is important to determine not only its density but also its ability to participate in policy-making. In addition, groups and associations claim that, through media support, they are better able to consolidate their actions and impact in their social context. Drawing from agenda setting; and framing theories we explore the degree to which the media contributes to this process through a discourse that reflects the density and/or ability approach. Using content analysis from print media in Barranquilla, Colombia – a city that reflects key dimensions of Colombia’s civil conflict - from 2000 to 2006, focal groups with media representatives, and interviews with leaders of civil society groups and associations, we seek to identify recommendations for improved media coverage and policy recommendations for groups and associations that will strengthen civil society organizations' contribution to democracy in developing countries faced with social and political unrest.

2010 - 4S Annual Meeting - Abstract and Session Submissions Words: 468 words || 
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5. Kuroda, Reiko. "Science in Society and Science for Society" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the 4S Annual Meeting - Abstract and Session Submissions, Komaba I Campus, University of Tokyo, Tokyo, Japan, <Not Available>. 2019-01-21 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p438262_index.html>
Publication Type: Abstract
Abstract: Science in the 21st century is different from what it used to be, in terms of science as an academic subject and its relation to society. It adopts interdisciplinary and systemic approaches based on the findings unraveled by analytical and reductionism approaches in the previous century. It has become increasingly international, as exemplified by Human and Rice Genome Decoding programmes and international megaprojects which require gigantic equipments/stations such as the International Thermocuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER), and the Large Hadron Collider (LHC).

The role of science in society has also changed. New technologies and the products now spread to our society increasingly fast and change our socio-economic structures and even our way of thinking. The world has become globalized and highly competitive. It is now a knowledge-based society, and most governments in the world urge “innovation” through scientific and technological development. At the same tine, the 21st century faces urgent global problems such as natural resources/energy depletion, loss of biodiversity, environmental deterioration, climate change, spreading epidemic, etc as well. These problems must be solved by science through international collaboration, but together with humanities and social sciences. They have to be dealt with globally as well as locally.

ICSU is one of the leading organizations working to solve these problems. ICSU is a non-governmental international organization with 121 National Academic Members (representing 141 countries) such as the Royal Society, National Academy of Science and the Science Council of Japan, and 30 International Scientific Unions including IUPAC, IUPAP, IUBMB etc. ICSU’s Mission is “Strengthen International Science for the Benefit of Society” and its strategy is structured around three over-lapping themes of i) International research collaboration, ii) Universality of Science, and iii) Science and policy. In 1999, ICSU organized World Conference on Science together with UNESCO and the Hungarian Academy of Science, where “Science for the 21st century – A New Commitment, Declaration on Science and the use of Scientific Knowledge” was adopted. For the first time, “science in society and science for society” was clearly stated as a role of science on top of the three traditional ones, i.e., science for knowledge, science for peace and science for development. Last year, ten years after the epoch-making Budapest meeting, a Forum was convened again to discuss along the theme of “knowledge and future”.

In this lecture, I shall overview the past, present and future of “science in society and science for society” based on my experience as a scientist in the filed of chemistry and biology, Vice President of ICSU, an ex-CSTP member (CSTP = Council for Science and Technology Policy, Cabinet Office, Japanese Government), and a director of Science Interpreter Training Programme of The University of Tokyo.

Ref. Reiko Kuroda, Formulas for the future. Asahi Evening News, 30th June, 1996.
Reiko Kuroda, “Nurturing Science”(a book in Japanese; Kagaku-wo-Hagukumu), Chuoh-ko-ron, 2002.

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