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2008 - American Sociological Association Annual Meeting Words: 1 words || 
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1. Kalleberg, Ragnvald. "Sociological Practice and Public Sociology in Norwegian Sociology" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Sociological Association Annual Meeting, Sheraton Boston and the Boston Marriott Copley Place, Boston, MA, <Not Available>. 2020-01-26 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p276061_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript

2004 - American Sociological Association Pages: 26 pages || Words: 8756 words || 
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2. Tamdgidi, Mohammad. "Private Sociologies and Burawoy's Sociology Types: Reflections on Newtonian and Quantum Sociological Imaginations" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Sociological Association, Hilton San Francisco & Renaissance Parc 55 Hotel, San Francisco, CA,, Aug 14, 2004 Online <.PDF>. 2020-01-26 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p110793_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Reflecting on Michael Burawoy’s classificaton of sociology into professional, critical, policy, and public types, and the adoption of the latter as the theme of the ASA’s 99th Annual Meeting, in this paper I argue that the drive towards increasingly global and world-historical public sociologies may prove hazardous in the absence of a parallel emphasis on the development and practice of private inter/intrapersonal sociologies. This requires self-critical revisitation of our basic definitions and theories in sociology in order to develop unified theoretical frameworks that meet the challenges of understanding and practicing the dialectics of public and private social processes in the twenty-first century. We need to move beyond Newtonian definitions and theorizations of sociology and embrace new quantal sociological imaginations that integrally engage our macro and micro sociologies in favor of simultaneously world-historical and inter/intrapersonal frameworks. Public sociologies can not advance our theoretical and applied sociologies of what is or what can be in the absence of parallel efforts in invigorating our sociological imaginations in our private, inter/intrapersonal social landscapes. Although personal troubles can best be understood in relationship to broader public issues, the latter themselves can most effectively be addressed and resolved through the action of specific individual agencies who champion the need for broader socio-historical interpretation and change as deeply personal exercises in self-knowledge and self-liberation. As Mills reminded us, what sparks the sociological imagination is the meeting of public and private sociologies.

2006 - American Sociological Association Pages: 15 pages || Words: 4786 words || 
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3. Rynbrandt, Linda. "Academic Sociology or Public Sociology: Conflicting Visions in Early Sociology" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Sociological Association, Montreal Convention Center, Montreal, Quebec, Canada, Aug 10, 2006 Online <PDF>. 2020-01-26 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p101513_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Abstract: Although sociology is now firmly entrenched in academe, a century ago various strands of sociology vied to define the discipline. A vibrant community-based, women-centered public sociology coexisted with academic sociology and offered an alternative vision of sociology and sociologists. Women such as Jane Addams and Caroline Bartlett Crane raised feminist concerns regarding research methods and the goals of social research. Their story, and the vast numbers of other women they represent, have largely been lost in the history of sociology. In this paper, I present an alternative version of the history of American sociology and suggest how the lost legacy of a democratic, public sociology has important implications for sociology in the 21st century.

2010 - American Sociological Association Annual Meeting Pages: unavailable || Words: 10433 words || 
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4. Simon, Nicolas. "Sociology or Sociologies, Universal or National Sociology?" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Sociological Association Annual Meeting, Hilton Atlanta and Atlanta Marriott Marquis, Atlanta, GA, Aug 14, 2010 Online <PDF>. 2020-01-26 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p409800_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: We use Sociology, in singular, yet we must ask ourselves if Sociologies, in plural, would not be more appropriate. By using the concept of Sociologies, we can introduce the different cultural, national, and linguistic influences which are so important for our discipline, our training, and our choice of subjects and topics. To explore this question, the following aspects of the American and French sociology will be compared and contrasted:
1) The definition of sociology and the perspectives and paradigms used in each national context.
2) The diffusion of content and sociologists presented by sociology textbooks.
3) The formal training provided by universities and the text books selected by the faculty.
4) Comparison of the sections of the American Sociological Association and the French Sociological Association.

2016 - American Sociological Association Annual Meeting Pages: unavailable || Words: unavailable || 
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5. Fuller, Brian. "Sociology and its Philosophical Other: Gillian Rose’s Critique of Sociological Reason" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Sociological Association Annual Meeting, Washington State Convention Center, Seattle, WA, Aug 17, 2016 Online <APPLICATION/PDF>. 2020-01-26 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1119154_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: More than thirty years ago, Gillian Rose articulated a significant critique of classical sociological reason, emphasizing its relationship to its philosophical forebears. In a series of works, but most significantly in her Hegel contra Sociology, Rose worked to specify the implications of sociology’s failure, both in its critical Marxist and its ‘scientific’ forms, to move beyond Kant and to fully come to terms with the thought of Hegel. In this article, I unpack and explain the substance of her criticisms, developing the necessary philosophical Hegelian background on which she founded them. I also argue that Rose’s attempted recuperation of ‘speculative reason’ for social theory remains of significant interest and relevance to contemporary debates concerning the nature and scope of sociological reason.

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