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2009 - International Communication Association Pages: 40 pages || Words: 9158 words || 
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1. Kang, Hyunjin., Bae, Keunmin. and Zhang, Shaoke. "Source Cues in Online News: Is Proximate Source More Powerful Than Distal Sources? (TOP Student Paper)" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the International Communication Association, Marriott, Chicago, IL, May 20, 2009 Online <PDF>. 2019-09-22 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p301053_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: With the rise of news aggregators, internet start pages and portal sites, there now exists a chain of sources for any piece of online news. Credible portals sometimes carry news items published by non-credible sources, but do users really factor in all the distal sources or do they rely simply on the proximate source delivering the news? Dual process models in psychology would predict that source is a peripheral cue and only those who are highly involved in the topic of the story would care to dig deeper.
We tested this proposition with a 2 (Issue involvement: High vs. Low) x 2 (Proximal source credibility: High vs. Low) x 2 (Distal source credibility: High vs. Low) full-factorial between-subjects experiment (N = 238) and found that while highly involved readers considered both proximate and distal sources, low-involvement readers were primarily influenced by the proximate source. Implications of these findings are discussed.

2007 - Midwest Political Science Association Pages: 24 pages || Words: 7754 words || 
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2. Sheagley, Geoffrey. "Blogs as Information Sources: The Impact of Source Credibility and Partisan Affiliation" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the Midwest Political Science Association, Palmer House Hotel, Chicago, IL, Apr 12, 2007 <Not Available>. 2019-09-22 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p199102_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Abstract: One of the fastest growing sources of political news, blogs have the potential to impact how political discourse occurs in the United States. The theory of the marketplace of ideas suggests that blogs, because they contain new information from many different sources, have the potential to substantially change American political discourse. Simply put, they may be playing an increasingly important role in American politics. The role of blogs is especially important given recent discussions between scholars and pundits regarding increasing party polarization in the electorate. At the same time, Sunstein’s (2001), among others, work on e-politics suggests that blogs may also contribute to polarization and be bad for democracy

Unfortunately most scholarly work in this area (among others Taber et al. 2001; Taber 2003, Mutz 1998) focuses on traditional media sources, not on the Internet generally or blogs specifically. The work that does pertain to blogs, namely Drezner and Farrell (2004), focuses on blogs’ power to agenda-set. Given the rapid increase in blog use and their apparent dissimilarity to tradition forms of media, it is also important to study the individual-level impact blogs may have on their readers.

Druckman (2001) shows the impact of source credibility on framing effects. Taber et al. (2001) show that individuals with strong partisan affiliation and/or prior beliefs on a topic will practice self-selection. Fried (1997) demonstrates that individuals who rely on non-traditional media sources tend to practice self-selection more than those who rely on mainstream media. Given the highly partisan nature of political blogs and their user created content it is important to study the interactions between blogs, specifically their partisan affiliation and credibility, and the people who read them. Given previous research I hypothesize that individuals who read credible blogs will be show evidence of framing effects while people who read non-credible blogs will not. Further, I predict that people will seek out credible blogs, but that when given the opportunity, i.e. a choice between credible and partisan, they will practice self-selection and seek blogs that correspond to their political affiliation.

To tease out the answers to these questions I use multiple methods, including an experiment and an observational study, to isolate the interactions between individuals and blogs. Findings from the study suggest mixed support for my hypotheses. On the one hand they suggest that people may in fact seek blogs that align to their own political ideologies. Further, these finding holds true even when people select between partisan and credible blogs. However, additional findings suggest that blogs may have little to no direct impact on the individuals who read them.

2012 - Association for Education in Journalism and Mass Communication Pages: unavailable || Words: 7897 words || 
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3. Liu, Na. and Lin, Fen. "New media, old sources: An examination of source diversity of online news in China" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the Association for Education in Journalism and Mass Communication, Chicago Marriott Downtown, Chicago, IL, Aug 09, 2012 Online <PDF>. 2019-09-22 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p582636_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: This study develops a two-dimensional source diversity of online news, containing both typological diversity and geographical diversity. Typological source can indicate the influence of new media technologies on the types of media; while geographical diversity can further offer deep economic and media power relationship behind news production on the Internet. A content analysis of most user-searched news on Baidu.com during 112 days shows that new media technologies didn’t bring substantial changes to the old news sources production in China. Traditional media still dominate online news sources; and those most developed regions are also the main providers of online news.

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