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2009 - International Communication Association Pages: 40 pages || Words: 9158 words || 
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1. Kang, Hyunjin., Bae, Keunmin. and Zhang, Shaoke. "Source Cues in Online News: Is Proximate Source More Powerful Than Distal Sources? (TOP Student Paper)" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the International Communication Association, Marriott, Chicago, IL, May 20, 2009 Online <PDF>. 2019-06-25 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p301053_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: With the rise of news aggregators, internet start pages and portal sites, there now exists a chain of sources for any piece of online news. Credible portals sometimes carry news items published by non-credible sources, but do users really factor in all the distal sources or do they rely simply on the proximate source delivering the news? Dual process models in psychology would predict that source is a peripheral cue and only those who are highly involved in the topic of the story would care to dig deeper.
We tested this proposition with a 2 (Issue involvement: High vs. Low) x 2 (Proximal source credibility: High vs. Low) x 2 (Distal source credibility: High vs. Low) full-factorial between-subjects experiment (N = 238) and found that while highly involved readers considered both proximate and distal sources, low-involvement readers were primarily influenced by the proximate source. Implications of these findings are discussed.

2016 - ICA's 66th Annual Conference Pages: unavailable || Words: unavailable || 
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2. Wintterlin, Florian. "Sourcing Social Media: Trust in Sources and Risk Perceptions of Journalists" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the ICA's 66th Annual Conference, Hilton Fukuoka Sea Hawk, Fukuoka, Japan, Jun 09, 2016 Online <X-TYPE/SUBTYPE>. 2019-06-25 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1103807_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Social media changes the way information disseminate in societies and journalism as profession which deals with information is affected as well on various stages of news production. Journalists have to develop new sourcing practices and ways to ensure the accuracy and correctness of news because the risk of false or manipulated information is increased by expanding technological capabilities. This paper describes changes in the relationship between journalists and sources due to digitalization and the use of social media content as a source. In a second step it examines the role of trust in sources and risk perceptions of journalists sourcing social media. The data was gathered using in-depth interviews with German television, radio and newspaper journalists who are concerned with online sources.

2018 - ICA's 68th Annual Conference Words: 175 words || 
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3. Pooley, Jefferson. "Open Sourcing and Communication History: Posting Primary Sources to New Publishing Platforms" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the ICA's 68th Annual Conference, Hilton Prague, Prague, Czech Republic, <Not Available>. 2019-06-25 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1364859_index.html>
Publication Type: Session Paper
Abstract: Scholarly publishing is changing fast: articles are unbundling from journals, open access provision has spread in both legal and de facto terms, and even the monograph has begun to escape its printed codex format. Among the many changes is that natural scientists are now expected, by many funders and some journals, to deposit their data alongside their published work. The aim of this “open data” movement is transparency, as well as easy replication. Though without the momentum or replication rationale, new publishing platforms are enabling historians and other humanists to “publish” their primary sources alongside their narrative histories. This practice of “open sourcing” is only just emerging, and without the mandate from funders; there are, in many cases, copyright issues to manage. But a nonprofit infrastructure to support open sourcing is already forming, in projects like Manifold, Vega, Editoria and Fulcrum. Communication historians could be among the first to benefit.

Jefferson Pooley is Associate Professor at Muhlenberg College and publishes frequently on matters of media and communication history, digital media communication and cultures of academic publishing.

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