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2006 - American Political Science Association Words: unavailable || 
Info
1. Hamayotsu, Kikue. "Democratic Aspiration, Regime Resilience and Islam in Southeast Asia: Authoritarianism and State Power Reconsidered" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Political Science Association, Marriott, Loews Philadelphia, and the Pennsylvania Convention Center, Philadelphia, PA, <Not Available>. 2019-12-13 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p151095_index.html>
Publication Type: Proceeding

2006 - American Political Science Association Words: unavailable || 
Info
2. Bertrand, Jacques. "Democratization and the Protection of Ethnic Minorities in Southeast Asia" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Political Science Association, Marriott, Loews Philadelphia, and the Pennsylvania Convention Center, Philadelphia, PA, <Not Available>. 2019-12-13 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p151167_index.html>
Publication Type: Proceeding

2004 - International Studies Association Pages: 22 pages || Words: 10904 words || 
Info
3. Caballero-Anthony, Mely. "Re-visioning Security in Southeast Asia" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the International Studies Association, Le Centre Sheraton Hotel, Montreal, Quebec, Canada, Mar 17, 2004 <Not Available>. 2019-12-13 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p74512_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: The paper aims to capture the dynamics of contesting security in Southeast Asia and examines how state and non-state actors have responded to the changing nature of its security environment. The paper argues that in spite of structural constraints and problems with conceptual clarity, human security is finding a place in the regional security discourses. Albeit found along the margins of subaltern security discourses, human security is the concept that embodies the security concerns of societies and where the most vulnerable can rearticulate their security in their own terms, without being excluded and alienated. Civil society organizations have been pivotal in framing human security through their transnational linkages and work in human rights and development.

2005 - International Studies Association Pages: 43 pages || Words: 12624 words || 
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4. Pak, Jin. "Challenges to SLOC Security in Southeast Asia and its Impact on U.S. Strategic Access" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the International Studies Association, Hilton Hawaiian Village, Honolulu, Hawaii, Mar 05, 2005 <Not Available>. 2019-12-13 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p70951_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Although the Malacca Strait is in Southeast Asia, its significance transcends regional boundaries. It is a commercial and energy lifeline upon which countries like China and Japan depend for the majority of their energy shipments. Its waters are in the vicinity of a complex web of territorial disputes, great power competition, and fears of encroachment. For the past two centuries, the United States has always made unrestricted navigation through these waters a national security interest – a collective good from which many Southeast Asian and Northeast Asian nations have benefited. But what happens when the United States is no longer the country of choice for providing this security due to a growing regionalism in East Asia and a steady decline in the popular support of U.S. policies? Will the United States’ strategic access in this region erode over time? This paper argues that if the threat of maritime terrorism continues to rise, and the United States is unable to effectively ensure SLOC security, then other nations will take unilateral or multilateral steps to increase this vital energy and trade link. The former may consist of moves that will increase competition between great powers while the latter may consist of confidence building measures that will accelerate the development of some sort of Asian security community. Whichever scenario comes to fruition, it will represent a marked change in East Asia’s security environment, and could challenge the United States’ ability to pursue its interests in the region.

2005 - International Studies Association Pages: 16 pages || Words: 8945 words || 
Info
5. Tan, See Seng. "The "New Diplomacy" in Southeast Asia: Civil Society or "Civil Service"?" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the International Studies Association, Hilton Hawaiian Village, Honolulu, Hawaii, Mar 05, 2005 <Not Available>. 2019-12-13 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p71012_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Over a decade has passed since the phenomenon of nonofficial diplomacy emerged as a notable theme in Southeast Asian security studies. This emergence has contributed, among other things, to a more expansive understanding of diplomacy as a multi-tracked enterprise with governmental as well as nongovernmental features. While conclusions concerning the nature and context of this broadened notion of diplomacy remain mostly nebulous, two observations regarding its nonofficial aspect are noteworthy, however. On one hand, nonofficial diplomacy in Southeast Asia is seen by some as emblematic of a growing and thriving civil society throughout the region, although it is clear that civil society is more developed in some ASEAN states relative to the rest. On the other, nonofficial diplomacy in the region has also been viewed more critically as supporting and legitimating regional governments and their policies-a sort of shadow civil service (i.e., civilians acting in the service of their respective states), as it were. While some have concluded that Track 2 processes-embodied by regional epistemic communities such as the ASEAN-ISIS and the CSCAP-exemplify the shadow civil service just described, others presume that other tracks-including, among others, NGOs and various social movements-are more properly representative of civil society, both in the domestic and transnational senses. Upon closer inspection, however, a more complex picture appears that calls into question the supposed coherence of that distinction. Against that backdrop, this paper analyses the evolution of nonofficial diplomacy in Southeast Asia in the post-Cold War era, paying close attention to its problems and prospects. More specifically, it seeks to unpack the complex processes in which regional nonofficial diplomatic actors engage that make them not only civil society participants who challenge the state, but, at the same time, paradoxically also civil servants who promote and protect its interests.

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