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2015 - International Communication Association 65th Annual Conference Words: 164 words || 
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1. Castellanos, Ralph. "Why Don’t You Speak Spanish? Identity Challenges Between English-Only Latinos and Spanish Speaking Latinos" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the International Communication Association 65th Annual Conference, Caribe Hilton, San Juan, Puerto Rico, <Not Available>. 2019-10-15 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p986704_index.html>
Publication Type: Session Paper
Abstract: This analysis concerns Latino/a intracutural communication, language-based authenticity performances, and facework negotiations and strategies. Research indicates that individualistic and collectivistic cultures differ in their facework strategies. Ting-Toomey (2005) suggests that collectivistic cultures employ other-face saving strategies with ingroup members and self-saving stratifies with outgroup. Researchers argue that ethnic identity weighs heavily on language acquisition and language skills. Taking a cultural approach to Latino culture, are English-only Latinos considered outgroup members to Spanish speaking Latinos? Studies have yet to inquire about the performance strategies Latino use to circumvent language based authenticity testing from other Latinos. The paper seeks to identify the face-saving strategies English-only Latinos use when responding to language based authenticity performance tests, i.e. “how do Latinos save face when confronted with Spanish based challenges”? Furthermore, to what extent do English-only Latinos’ performances engage in face-saving strategies achieve desired goals, such as ingroup status? Ethnography of communication approach and qualitative interviews are utilized to gather thematic data centered in an interpretivist frameworks is utilized.

2012 - LRA 62nd Annual Conference Pages: unavailable || Words: 939 words || 
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2. Kamberelis, George. and Reaves, Melanie. "Cognitive Reorganization During Early Writing Development: A Comparison of English-Speaking and Spanish-Speaking Children" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the LRA 62nd Annual Conference, Sheraton San Diego Hotel & Marina, San Diego, CA, Nov 28, 2012 Online <APPLICATION/PDF>. 2019-10-15 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p578859_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed

2004 - American Sociological Association Pages: 37 pages || Words: 8860 words || 
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3. Deeb-Sossa, Natalia. "Do They Make a Difference? Comparing Spanish Speaking to English Speaking Hispanic Respondents" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Sociological Association, Hilton San Francisco & Renaissance Parc 55 Hotel, San Francisco, CA,, Aug 14, 2004 Online <.PDF>. 2019-10-15 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p108768_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: The results of the 2000 U.S. Census Bureau show that Hispanics and Asians are the fastest-growing minority populations in the United States. According to the 2000 Census the states of Nevada, Georgia and North Carolina experienced the biggest percentage point increases in minorities, and California, Texas and New York had the highest numbers of minorities. All southern states, except West Virginia, have experienced a huge increase of Hispanic newcomers. Thus, the immigration of Latin American people to the southern states of the US forces all of us to rethink the old idea of what a southerner is.

Yet many nationally representative surveys used by sociologists – like the General Social Survey – and nationally representative surveys that oversample the south – like the Southern Focus Poll – have not translated their instruments to accommodate the growing Hispanic immigrant population, most of which do not proficiently speak English. Thus there is a large gap between the existing data collected by these surveys and the information we need. Consequently, many questions remain unanswered. For example: How do the demographic characteristics of Hispanic immigrants that speak only Spanish differ from those who are bilingual? How different are the bilingual Hispanic and the monolingual Hispanic groups on their responses to important sociological issues? And, what might explain the observed differences, if any, in these substantive responses?

In this paper I will provide evidence that addresses these three questions by contrasting the responses of Hispanics who agreed to answer the Spring, 2001 Southern Focus Poll (SFP) in English and the responses of Hispanics, who did not complete the SFP, but agreed to answer the same survey after I translated it into Spanish. In sum my goals are to: (1) contrast demographics of these two Hispanic groups; (2) contrast these groups’ perceptions of how much they are a part of the group Hispanic, or their sense of cohesion (Bollen and Hoyle’s (1990)); and (3) provide rationale for observed differences in (2).

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