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Showing 1 through 5 of 1,546 records.
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2005 - American Sociological Association Pages: 30 pages || Words: 6668 words || 
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1. Waren, Warren. "The Search for Spatial Assimilation: Trends In Spatial Assimilation among Blacks In Houston, Texas 1970-2000" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Sociological Association, Marriott Hotel, Loews Philadelphia Hotel, Philadelphia, PA, Aug 12, 2005 Online <PDF>. 2019-09-23 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p19707_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Abstract: This paper examines the spatial attainment of blacks in Houston, Texas in 1970 and 2000. It examines changes in the demographic composition of neighborhoods where blacks live to assess whether blacks are assimilating spatially. It also investigates the exposure of blacks to whites and other blacks by education (a proxy for socio-economic status). The results suggest that a spatial assimilation dynamic was absent in Houston in 1970 but is clearly evident in 2000.

2005 - International Communication Association Pages: 22 pages || Words: 5966 words || 
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2. Lee, Seungyoon. "Telecommunications, Spatial Infrastructure, and Spatial Interaction: Looking Through the Case of Seoul" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the International Communication Association, Sheraton New York, New York City, NY, Online <APPLICATION/PDF>. 2019-09-23 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p14977_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Abstract: The history of telecommunications development has often been thought as a force that dilutes the notion of geographical space and boundaries in contemporary society. This paper attempts to give an understanding of the interactive mechanism between the spatial characteristics of a city and the patterns of changes brought by the diffusion of technology. This paper includes a case study of Seoul, the capital city of Korea, which is regarded as displaying a remarkable speed and scope in the diffusion of new information and communication technologies. Through observing the pattern of interaction grounded upon actual physical space and the regional efforts to reconstruct spaces of the city, it is assessed that the notion of geographical space is still crucial for understanding the technological landscape in the midst of digital technologies driving people toward virtual space and virtual reality. From a multi-level perspective, it is examined that the spatial infrastructure of city influences the pattern of technological development, consequently transforming spatial interaction including the pattern of individual lifestyle and the interaction among people based on urban space. Micro-, meso-, and macro-level forces interact with each other and subsequently influence the spatial infrastructure of a city. A case analysis on the background spatial characteristics of Seoul and the recent trend of major transformations is given to help understand this interactive mechanism.

2006 - International Studies Association Words: 304 words || 
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3. Wheatley, Elizabeth. "Crossing Spatial and Non-Spatial Borders: A ?Glocal? Analysis of the Transnational Indigenous Peoples? Movement (TIPM) in Latin America" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the International Studies Association, Town & Country Resort and Convention Center, San Diego, California, USA, Mar 22, 2006 <Not Available>. 2019-09-23 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p99925_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Abstract: International relations scholars have amply described indigenous politics through state-centric analyses. They have focused on the productive power of advocacy/issue networks to mobilize support, transcend political isolation, and create ?political wedges? for indigenous activism. Through this approach scholars have been able to measure the ?successes? of indigenous activism. Yet they have not brought this understanding to detailed case studies. On the other hand, area specialists pursuing such case studies using a local level of analysis have tended to slight the importance or even the existence of a transnational element. These scholars have dismissed the TIPM as an artificial product of alienated indigenous intellectuals with little or no ?authentic? connection with the local setting. It appears in these studies as if indigenous politics play out solely within their respective national arenas. The aim of this paper is to address this gap and consider the role of the TIPM through a ?glocal? level of analysis. In particular this paper will address the interesting puzzle: How have indigenous discourses been produced in Latin America and what are their real material implications?In this paper I will draw upon postcolonial research. Like much postcolonial work, the aim of this paper is not to measure the ?success? of indigenous activism or show that conceptions of Indian-ness are false, but rather to show that the institutionalized production of certain kinds of ideas about Indian-ness has important effects, and that the production of such ideas plays an important role in the production of certain sorts of structural change. I argue that indigenous activity is organized on the basis of this structure of knowledge and has regular effects which include the essentialization, ?greening? and commodification of indigenous groups. Consequently, the TIPM ironically mirrors historic ?indigenismo? programs that were formed in Latin America to generate productive members of society and solve the ?Indian problem?.

2006 - American Studies Association Words: 140 words || 
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4. Goeman, Mishuana. "The Gendered Dynamics of Colonial Spatial Restructuring and Native Spatial Decolonization" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Studies Association, Oct 12, 2006 <Not Available>. 2019-09-23 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p114609_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Abstract: In this presentation, I will explore the way that colonial restructuring of Native bodies, gender dynamics, and lands coalesce into patterns of spatial impositions at various scales. My main focus, however, will examine narrations of space that counter the dismemberment of land/bodies through the use of memory and story. Both through collective and individual memory and story, I will look at the place of story in efforts to (re)map connections between bodies in a place and within a community. I will discuss the way land is presented and gendered through historic and embodied memory in Linda Hogan’s in Solar Storms, but will then move to make larger connections to the ways indigenous forms of mapping, especially those that incorporate memory and narrative, are asserting sovereignty, rethinking national borders, and recuperating a spatial imagining of community from its colonial imposition.

2008 - NCA 94th Annual Convention Pages: unavailable || Words: 1047 words || 
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5. Shin, Yong Jun. "Understanding spatial differentiation of social interaction: Suggesting a conceptual framework for spatial media" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the NCA 94th Annual Convention, TBA, San Diego, CA, Nov 20, 2008 Online <APPLICATION/PDF>. 2019-09-23 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p259931_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Abstract: Urban planning is a means for artificially differentiating urban space. It also shapes social interaction on the whole. While urban planning is fundamentally related to communications, it has been barely discussed in the communication field. Hence, I explain the impact of urban planning on social life and describe the intellectual trajectories of urban sociology and urban communication in order to draw more attentions from communication scholars to urban issues. Then, based on the review of the spatial impact on social interaction, a conceptual framework is suggested – spatial media, which is defined as abstracted forms of objects exchanged in spatially differentiated social interactions. This conceptualization intends to overcome the limited understanding of the spatial impact on social life from different approaches to the physical impact on human behavior. The framework will direct the focus of the investigation of spatial differentiation toward the three significant social mechanisms of media; social integration, social stratification, and civic participation. With the implications of spatial media, communication researchers are expected to contribute to urban planning process by bring communication factors to planning discussions.

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