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2007 - American Council on the Teaching of Foreign Languages Words: 91 words || 
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1. Lin, Grace Yuh-Huey. "Expressions of Gratitude: A Cross-cultural Comparison between Chinese Speakers in Taiwan and English Speakers in the U.S." Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Council on the Teaching of Foreign Languages, Henry B. Gonzalez Convention Center, San Antonio, TX, Nov 12, 2007 <Not Available>. 2019-11-21 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p182412_index.html>
Publication Type: Session Presentation
Abstract: Expressing thanks has been widely recognized as one of the most important social acts because it facilitates warm feelings and solidarity among interlocutors (Cohen, 1996; Eisenstein and Bodman, 1986, 1993; Intachakra, 2004; Leech, 1983). However, a review of literature reveals that despite its importance and the high frequency of its use in daily social interactions, the speech act of expressing gratitude has attracted little research attention compared to other speech acts and most researches focused only on the main strategies without furthering into sub-strategies of the semantic content of the strategies.

2004 - International Communication Association Words: 120 words || 
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2. Kotani, Mariko. "Co-Constructing Extensive Accounts: Japanese Speakers’ Practice With English Speakers" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the International Communication Association, New Orleans Sheraton, New Orleans, LA, May 27, 2004 <Not Available>. 2019-11-21 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p112826_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Previous studies suggested that Japanese speakers perceived American English-speakers as offering detailed accounts in situations in which they considered it appropriate to give an expression of regret and a brief explanation. The analysis of a conversation in which a Japanese and an English speaker engaged in accounting practices reveals, however, that the English speaker did not construct her detailed accounts alone. Instead, the Japanese speaker co-constructed the English speaker’s extensive accounts by not explicitly honoring them and by using continuers. The paper suggests that Japanese speakers’ view of American English speakers as providing extensive accounts may be formed and reinforced in interactions such as the one analyzed here without their being aware of their own influence on English speakers’ behavior.

2015 - AAAL Annual Conference Words: 46 words || 
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3. Eslami, Zohreh. and Jabbari, Nasser. "Compliments on Facebook: Americans English speakers vs. Iranian Persian speakers" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the AAAL Annual Conference, Fairmont Royal York, Toronto, ON, Canada, Mar 21, 2015 <Not Available>. 2019-11-21 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p963600_index.html>
Publication Type: Roundtable Presentation
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: This research examines complimenting behavior among Facebook users in Persian and English. The research offers a preliminary characterization of Facebook compliments in American English and Persian language in relation to the form compliments take, common objects of complimenting and the key function(s) that they perform.

2009 - Midwest Political Science Association 67th Annual National Conference Pages: 17 pages || Words: 6204 words || 
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4. Browning, Robert. "The Speaker is Recognized: Floor Behavior of House Speakers, 1983-2007" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the Midwest Political Science Association 67th Annual National Conference, The Palmer House Hilton, Chicago, IL, Apr 02, 2009 Online <APPLICATION/PDF>. 2019-11-21 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p361281_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: The Speaker of the U.S. House of Representatives has multiple roles. This study addresses an aspect of the speakership that has not been previously analyzed. In this paper we examine the floor behavior, through speaking and voting, of the past six Speakers of the U.S. House. _x000d_The congressional literature is been replete with debates over competing models of party influence in the House. Smith argues that single goal models are insufficient to explain party leadership. Sinclair emphasizes party polarization as a critical factor in explaining behavior in the post-reform Congress. Cox and McCubbins have advanced the cartel theory of control by party leaders. Electoral influences are dominant in Rohde’s analysis._x000d_In this paper, we will explore whether the floor appearances of Speakers lend support for any of the competing theories of party leadership in the House. The 1983-2008 time period and number of different Speakers (14 years for each party) provide a rich data set with variation to test these hypotheses. These are first data of actual floor appearances that have been analyzed. They are available from data collected from C-SPAN video recordings of the House of Representatives.

2013 - AAAL Annual Conference Words: 50 words || 
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5. Moranski, Kara. "Native-speaker perception as the sum of its parts: Specific linguistic and affective variables in Spanish native-speaker evaluations of learner phonology" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the AAAL Annual Conference, Sheraton Dallas, Dallas, Texas, Mar 16, 2013 <Not Available>. 2019-11-21 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p626587_index.html>
Publication Type: Individual Paper
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: This study investigated Spanish-NS perception of accent in learner speech in conjunction with both linguistic processes occurring within speech samples and attitudinal variables specific to each NS listener. Both areas showed statistically significant relationships with accentedness ratings, and a hierarchy of saliency arose from the analyses of segmental consonantal commentary.

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