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2008 - MPSA Annual National Conference Pages: 13 pages || Words: 4340 words || 
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1. Carey, Allan. "The Speech of the King: An Examination of Speech and Deed in Thucydides’ Peloponnesian War as Understood Through the First Speech of King Archidamus" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the MPSA Annual National Conference, Palmer House Hotel, Hilton, Chicago, IL, Apr 03, 2008 Online <PDF>. 2019-04-23 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p267130_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Abstract: To understand Thucydides one needs to consider the profound relationship between the author's narration and the speeches of characters. This paper examines that relationship in the first speech of King Archidamus and its subsequent implications.

2009 - NCA 95th Annual Convention Pages: unavailable || Words: 4064 words || 
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2. Chandrashekar, Santhosh. "When Hate Speech Hurts: Speech Code as a Strategy to Check Hate Speech" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the NCA 95th Annual Convention, Chicago Hilton & Towers, Chicago, IL, Nov 11, 2009 Online <APPLICATION/PDF>. 2019-04-23 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p368808_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: This study makes a case for introducing speech codes on campuses in a bid to curb the growing incidence of hate speech. Tracing the historical differences between First Amendment and Fourteenth Amendment proponents and outlining the major arguments that both sides put forth in defense of their respective positions, this study argues that a speech code that meets certain conditions is a fair compromise between speech code opponents and proponents

2006 - XVth Biennial International Conference on Infant Studies Words: 408 words || 
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3. Igarashi, Yosuke. and Mazuka, Reiko. "Speech rate in infant-directed speech in Japanese is NOT slower than adult-directed speech." Paper presented at the annual meeting of the XVth Biennial International Conference on Infant Studies, Westin Miyako, Kyoto, Japan, Jun 19, 2006 <Not Available>. 2019-04-23 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p93990_index.html>
Publication Type: Individual Poster
Abstract: Background and Aims: Infant-directed speech (ID) has specific prosodic characteristics that are distinct from adult-directed speech (AD). A slower speech rate is one such characteristic, and has often been assumed/claimed to be a universal property of ID.
In English, ID speech has been found to have shorter utterances and longer pauses than AD. Even after pauses are removed, the number of syllables uttered per unit of time has been found to be fewer in ID than AD. When function words and content words are separated, slower speech rates have been found only in content words. To test whether slower speech rate is a universal characteristic of ID, it is necessary to analyze ID from different languages. To date, however, data from other languages is limited. In this paper, we present data from Japanese ID. Japanese provides useful contrast to English since Japanese mothers’ interaction with their infants and their ID speech have been reported to show distinct characteristics from American mothers.

Method: 22 Japanese mothers were brought to the laboratory, and their speech to their 18-24 month-old infants and to an adult experimenter was recorded. Approximately 40 minutes of recordings from each mother, totaling about 14 hours, were phonetically transcribed. From these data, (1) duration of utterances (defined as continuous speech separated by at least 200 msec of pauses), (2) duration of pauses, (3) number of syllables per second excluding pauses, were calculated.

Key Results: The duration of ID utterances was significantly shorter than AD utterances, and ID speech contained significantly more frequent and longer pauses than AD. These are consistent with English ID speech. The number of syllables per unit time was, however, no fewer in ID than AD. Approximately half of the 22 mothers had faster speech rate in AD, while the other half had a faster speech rate in ID. Morphological analysis of the data showed that ID contained significantly fewer case particles or other function words than AD. Thus, it was not the frequent occurrence of function words (with shorter syllables) in the ID speech that contributed to the faster speech rate.

Conclusions: Like other languages, ID speech in Japanese had shorter utterances and more pauses. But the actual speech rate of Japanese mothers, viz., how fast each syllable is articulated, was not any slower in ID than AD. The present data shows that the slower speech rate is NOT a universal characteristic of ID speech.

2018 - 89th Annual SPSA Conference Pages: unavailable || Words: unavailable || 
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4. Barranca, Abraham. "Freeing Speech from Hate: Do Restrictions on Illiberal Speech Indicate a Propensity Toward State Illiberality?" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the 89th Annual SPSA Conference, Hyatt Regency, New Orleans, LA, Jan 04, 2018 Online <APPLICATION/PDF>. 2019-04-23 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1329692_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Political theorists and legal scholars have debated at length whether the law should protect all speech absolutely as an equal contribution to the marketplace of ideas, or whether it should limit the propagation of hateful, defamatory, and illiberal speech. The first option is the overarching principle motivating jurisprudence on the subject in the United States. Other states have adopted alternative approaches to hate speech that elevate the importance of group dignity in legal considerations at the expense of some of the broad protections afforded speech in the relatively extreme example of U.S. doctrine.

While scholars typically argue the merits or drawbacks of speech limitations on normative grounds, this paper evaluates the subject empirically. Instead of asking how far freedom of speech should extend, I ask: (1) Do certain types of countries institute laws restricting hate speech? (2) How far can limitations on hate speech reach before they become detrimental to the health of liberal democracy? (3) Must hate speech laws possess certain characteristics (e.g. specificity, historic derivation) to avoid corroding state liberal quality?

Using original data collection on hate speech laws from countries around the world and data from the Varieties of Democracy (V-Dem) dataset, this paper measures the relationship between hate speech restrictions and liberal democratic quality. I hypothesize that hate speech laws do not on their own indicate the corrosion of liberal democratic quality. I hypothesize further that illiberal regimes’ hate speech laws will be broadly worded, whereas such laws will be narrowly-tailored and historically-grounded in liberal democracies.

2018 - MPSA Annual Conference Pages: unavailable || Words: unavailable || 
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5. Federman, Cary. "Free Speech and Hate Speech in a Decent Society: Toward a Jurisprudence of the First Amendment" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the MPSA Annual Conference, Palmer House Hilton, Chicago, IL, Apr 05, 2018 <Not Available>. 2019-04-23 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1343441_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: This paper draws a contrast between two anti-libertarian speech positions, one that favors hate speech legislation in the name of autonomy and dignity; the other to suppress obscenities and pornography in the name of the public interest in decency.

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