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2004 - American Sociological Association Pages: 21 pages || Words: 6034 words || 
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1. Pulver, Simone. "Power in the Public Sphere: The UN Climate Negotiations as a Contemporary International Public Sphere" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Sociological Association, Hilton San Francisco & Renaissance Parc 55 Hotel, San Francisco, CA,, Aug 14, 2004 Online <.PDF>. 2019-06-25 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p110295_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: The conundrum of international climate regulation is that it even exists. Global climate change has issue characteristics that pose major challenges to supporters of international climate policy. Nevertheless, the international community of states has embarked on a regulatory trajectory of binding commitments to reduce greenhouse gas emissions. Moreover, this trajectory lies much closer to the preferences of environmental NGOs than to the preferences of most fossil fuel companies and other conservative business interests. This article uses Habermas’ concept of the public sphere to explain the trajectory of the international climate policy and to analyze the environmental community’s success in shaping that trajectory in the face of strong opposition from the structurally and materially powerful oil industry. I argue that the particular institutional characteristics of the climate negotiations—their ideology of science-based environmental stewardship, their global scope, their emphasis on the public good, and their commitment to public access and participation—enable the participatory parity, rational debate about the common interest, and formation of strong public opinion which define a public sphere.

2005 - The Midwest Political Science Association Words: 38 words || 
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2. Gilman-Opalsky, Richard. "Post Cold War Public Spheres: Neither National Nor Transnational: A Theory of Transgressive Public Spheres" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the The Midwest Political Science Association, Palmer House Hilton, Chicago, Illinois, Apr 07, 2005 <Not Available>. 2019-06-25 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p85714_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Some post Cold War public spheres challenge the view that globalization requires a transition from state-bounded to transnational politics. I show this through an analysis of J. Habermas? public sphere theory and the case of the Mexican Zapatistas.

2007 - International Communication Association Pages: 39 pages || Words: 16989 words || 
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3. Koller, Andreas. "The Public Sphere, the Field of Power, and Comparative-Historical Research: The Intermediary Sphere of Society" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the International Communication Association, TBA, San Francisco, CA, May 23, 2007 <Not Available>. 2019-06-25 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p172416_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Abstract: Referring to the ICA 2006 keynote speech, this paper conceptually takes a path not taken in social science, marked by John Dewey, C. Wright Mills, Jürgen Habermas and pragmatist thought more generally. Particularly Mills suggested the structural transformation of the public sphere as an alternative framework for com-munication and media studies. This paper lays out a conceptual map for this framework by linking public sphere theory with contemporary social theory and with established comparative-historical research traditions. To address these disconnections, the oscillating meaning of the term public sphere must be differentiated into its broader and its narrower sense: broadly, as the sphere of public communication; and narrowly, as the capacity for reasoned collective choice. The paper argues that the sphere of public communication as an intermediary sphere between the private sphere of everyday life and the different fields of society is analogous to the public part of Bourdieu’s understudied notion of the field of power as an encompassing sphere between the different fields of society. Fur-thermore, this paper asks how to overcome the disconnection from the established traditions of comparative-historical research. It suggests that the different traditions can be bridged through the study of diffusion processes in the sphere of public communication in general and the study of its capacity for reasoned collective choice in particular. The paper provides an analytical framework for the study of the structural conditions of these diffusion processes by bringing together conceptual tools from various theory and research traditions.

2004 - American Sociological Association Pages: 26 pages || Words: 7101 words || 
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4. Yoo, Eunhye. "State, Intellectuals and Citizens in the Public Sphere and the Private Sphere" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Sociological Association, Hilton San Francisco & Renaissance Parc 55 Hotel, San Francisco, CA,, Aug 14, 2004 Online <.PDF>. 2019-06-25 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p109288_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: This article hypothesizes an alternative approach to look into civil society based on the argument of Habermas’s concept of ‘public sphere’. As many scholars have stated, the public sphere is considered as a critical condition in transition to democracy, but, no one focuses on the preconditions for the existence of public sphere in civil society. Under what conditions the public sphere in civil society fully developed or declined? Based on the importance of private sphere as a foundation for deciding the features of public sphere in one society, I demonstrate that extreme physical violence from the state apparatus such as police or army and the lack of cultural resources were critical in explaining the failure of democracy in South Korea after World War II. The audience-oriented rationality in communication between ordinary citizens was paralyzed due to extreme physical violence, i.e., “bio-power” in Foucaultian terms and the intellectuals who were supposed to put their cultural resources into the public sphere also suffered from the lack of cultural resources as well as repression from the state.

2009 - NCA 95th Annual Convention Pages: unavailable || Words: 6437 words || 
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5. Murray, Billie. "Deconstructing the Binaries of the Public Sphere: Heuristics for Understanding the Public Sphere as Material" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the NCA 95th Annual Convention, Chicago Hilton & Towers, Chicago, IL, Nov 11, 2009 Online <APPLICATION/PDF>. 2019-06-25 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p365683_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: This essay expands conceptions of the public sphere in order to provide an understanding of the public sphere as a material, as opposed to just discursive, space. This expanded conception contributes to understandings of how critical publicity is formed and disseminated. Using the public spaces of protest as an example, this essay will explore discursive/material spaces and formation/dissemination of critical publicity binaries in order to provide heuristics for understanding the materiality of the public sphere.

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