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2008 - NCA 94th Annual Convention Pages: 26 pages || Words: 7124 words || 
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1. Schuh, Janel. "Mapping the Stars: Reproducing Celebrities in Movie Star Homes Tours" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the NCA 94th Annual Convention, TBA, San Diego, CA, Nov 20, 2008 Online <PDF>. 2019-08-20 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p259851_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Abstract: Relevant literature on celebrity film tourism and celebrity culture is reviewed in relation to movie star home tour guides, people active in both reproducing and consuming celebrities. Analysis of preliminary data gathered through participant observation revealed five core themes related to the reproduction of celebrities in movie star home tours: tour guiding as work, tour guiding as performance, celebrity encounters, following the media’s lead, and negotiating class through movie star homes tours.

2015 - National Council for Black Studies (NCBS) 39TH Annual Conference Words: 258 words || 
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2. Jordan, Owena. "It's Written In The Stars: Zoe Saldana's Star Image or How She Got This Job" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the National Council for Black Studies (NCBS) 39TH Annual Conference, The Westin Los Angeles Airport Hotel, Los Angeles, California, Mar 11, 2015 <Not Available>. 2019-08-20 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1004988_index.html>
Publication Type: Individual Abstract
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: This paper examines the construction of race in media, specifically film, as depicted by non-whiteness (blackness) and juxtaposed against whiteness. The dominant ideas about masculinity and femininity are also examined as both race and gender are represented on film as a social hierarchy. Critical social theory and star theory are both utilized as the theoretical framework for this paper. Star theory deals with the star image of stars and is not concerned at all with the “real” person but rather the public persona as a commodity for mass consumption. The research method employed for this paper is a case study of Zoe Saldana. I argue that the textual material surrounding Zoe Saldana’s star image creates and circulates notions that non-whiteness (blackness) is racially inferior because it embodies non-human animal behavior, and Black womanhood is the personification of depravity because Black women are believed to have an insatiable animal-like sexual appetite. I argue that Saldana’s star image, as a consequence, informs our views and perceptions of non-whiteness and Black womanhood influencing casting decisions. This study’s findings are significant because Black Latinos in Hollywood are a growing population that is largely ignored. Although there’s research on mixed-race Latina stars, the amount of attention paid to the star image of Black Latina/os is exiguous. This paper demonstrates how Zoe Saldana’s star image is of an explicitly racial and sexual nature that defines, creates and circulates ideas about race and gender and shows the need to implement more research on Black Latina/os in Hollywood.

2016 - Southwestern Social Science Association 97th Annual Meeting Words: 8 words || 
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3. Gooch, Donald. "The Federation vs. The Empire: A Comparative Analysis of the Primary Regimes in Star Trek and Star Wars in terms of Federalism, Liberalism and Democratic Theory" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the Southwestern Social Science Association 97th Annual Meeting, Paris and Bally’s Hotels, Las Vegas, Nevada, Mar 23, 2016 <Not Available>. 2019-08-20 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1114262_index.html>
Publication Type: Panel Paper
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Proposal for the Fiction and Fantasy session.
Don Gooch

2016 - American Political Science Association Annual Meeting Pages: unavailable || Words: unavailable || 
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4. Campbell, Joel. and Gokcek, Gigi. "Comparing “Star Trek” and “Star Wars” as Tools for Teaching Political Science" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Political Science Association Annual Meeting, TBA, Philadelphia, PA, Sep 01, 2016 <Not Available>. 2019-08-20 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1114513_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Professors use political science courses to teach major theories and political concepts, in order for students to understand complex issues, but students may have difficulty understanding these ideas, and need an accessible way to get a general grasp of them. We believe that a blended use of the “Star Trek” television and “Star Wars” film franchises can provide instructors with useful learning tools by which students can obtain a general understanding of political science courses. We focus particularly on the original 1960s “Star Trek” television series and the first trilogy of “Star Wars” films. The “Star Trek” series provides an unmatched introduction to major theoretical approaches in international relations, especially realism/neorealism, liberalism/neoliberalism, and radicalism/Marxism. It also examines key political topics such as racism, sexism, military organizations, and peacemaking. The “Star Wars” movies allow instructors to make a more in-depth exploration of political topics such as authoritarianism and democracy, revolutions and insurgencies, and leadership and the role of individuals in social and political movements. It also considers such political issues as ethnic and sexual equality, racial diversity, and the relationship of religion and politics.

2007 - American Sociological Association Pages: 22 pages || Words: 6186 words || 
Info
5. Reynolds, John. and Baird, Chardie. "The Mental Health Consequences of Unrealistic Achievement Expectations: Is It Better to “Shoot for the Stars” or “Plan for the Probable”?" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Sociological Association, TBA, New York, New York City, Aug 11, 2007 Online <APPLICATION/PDF>. 2019-08-20 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p177262_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Abstract: There is growing concern in the United States that adolescents and young adults have become increasingly unrealistic about their future achievements. Ample research evidence confirms that achievement expectations infrequently correspond to what is likely to occur. For example, contemporary teenagers expect to attain much more post-secondary education than their cohort will eventually attain. Yet what researchers have failed to show is whether unrealistic plans are necessarily problematic, despite the popular belief that they lead to frustration, wasted resources, and demoralization. This paper uses the 1979 National Longitudinal Survey of Youth to examine the mental health consequences of holding unrealistic expectations about getting a four-year college degree. Lagged panel regression models confirm that failing to achieve one’s college expectations is associated with lower levels of self-esteem and mastery and higher levels of depression. The negative impact of failing to complete a four-year degree is largest among those with little academic potential – that is, young adults whose plans were unrealistic given their academic potential – and larger for men than it is for women. However, teenagers who held unrealistic plans fared better than those of comparable academic potential who did not plan to complete a college degree. These findings suggest that “shooting for the stars” and falling short has offsetting benefits that boost students’ mental health beyond that experienced by young adults who “planned for the probable” and expected early on they would not get a college degree. Possible explanations for the surprising benefits of unrealistic plans are discussed.

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