Guest  

 
Search: 
Search By: SubjectAbstractAuthorTitleFull-Text

 

Showing 1 through 5 of 499 records.
Pages: Previous - 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 ... 100 - Next  Jump:
2004 - American Sociological Association Pages: 20 pages || Words: 5777 words || 
Info
1. Kim, Phillip. "Starting Off Right: Financial Resources and Achieving Operating Status of Start-up Ventures" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Sociological Association, Hilton San Francisco & Renaissance Parc 55 Hotel, San Francisco, CA,, Aug 14, 2004 Online <.PDF>. 2020-02-22 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p110311_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: In this paper, I test the liquidity constraint theory facing entrepreneurs as they start new businesses. Previous research points toward a positive relationship between wealth and financial resources of entrepreneurs and the viability of the organizations they found. Specifically, I focus on whether financial resources positively impact the rate of achieving operating status in the new ventures. Using data from the Panel Study of Entrepreneurial Dynamics (PSED), I found that household income and personal financial contributions positively contributed to reaching operational status more quickly, while household net worth did not have any association. Other factors such as start-up experience, both previous and current, had a negative impact on the rate of achieving operating status.

2015 - LRA 65th Annual Conference Pages: unavailable || Words: unavailable || 
Info
2. Hoffman, Emily. "Giving an online start to those who provide the early literacy start in the classroom" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the LRA 65th Annual Conference, Omni La Costa Resort and Spa, Carlsbad, CA, Dec 02, 2015 Online <APPLICATION/PDF>. 2020-02-22 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1027868_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed

2015 - SRCD Biennial Meeting Words: 509 words || 
Info
3. Jenkins, Jade., Farkas, George., Duncan, Greg., Burchinal, Margaret. and Vandell, Deborah. "Head Start at ages 3 and 4 versus Head Start followed by state pre-k: Which is more effective?" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the SRCD Biennial Meeting, Pennsylvania Convention Center and the Philadelphia Marriott Downtown Hotel, Philadelphia, PA, <Not Available>. 2020-02-22 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p958268_index.html>
Publication Type: Presentation
Abstract: In light of evidence that high quality early learning experiences can improve children’s school readiness and future academic success, a number of recent proposals at the federal and state levels would expand public early childhood education programs. As policy-makers contemplate expanding preschool opportunities for low-income children, one possibility is to fund two, rather than one year of Head Start for children at ages 3 and 4. Another option is to offer one year of Head Start followed by one year of pre-k.
The objective of this study is to answer one key question: If children participate in Head Start at age 3, is it more beneficial for them to remain in the program at age 4 or to participate in a universal pre-k program at age-4? We use data from the study of the Oklahoma Pre-kindergarten program (OK pre-k) to compare outcomes for two different preschool ‘pathways’ to kindergarten (Gormley et al., 2005, 2008, 2010). One of these involves Head Start at both ages 3 and 4. The other involves Head Start at age 3 followed by OK pre-k at age 4. We use a regression discontinuity design with a strict age eligibility cutoff for program participation to estimate the effect of these pathways on children’s pre-academic skills at kindergarten. We apply propensity score weighting to the analyses to address selection into pathways and compare their effects on child outcomes. We use dummy variable adjustments for missing data. We also conduct a number or robustness tests to meet the required assumptions of each method and to confirm the reliability of our findings.
Our analytic sample was restricted to children in OK pre-k study who were eligible for free or reduced-price lunch, and that attended Head Start at age 3 (n=540). A majority of the children in the sample were African American (53%) or Hispanic (28%), and most identified English as their home language (65%). Eighty-five percent of the sample had parents with at least a high school diploma. After propensity score weighting, the covariates of children in the two pathways become very similar (Table 1). We examined three pre-academic outcomes from the Woodcock-Johnson III: Letter-Word Identification (pre-reading); Spelling (pre-writing); Applied Problems (pre-math).
We find that children attending Head Start at age 3 develop stronger pre-reading skills in the high quality OK pre-k program at age 4 compared with attending Head Start at age 4, with effect sizes on Letter-Word of 0.98, 0.46, respectfully (Figure 1). OK pre-k and Head Start were not differentially linked to improvements in children’s pre-writing skills or pre-math skills. This suggests that the impacts of early learning programs may be related to program sequencing, with a more academic curriculum at age 4, and the extent to which the Head Start curriculum offers differential learning experiences to 4-year-olds who were, and were not, in the program at age 3. The specific reasons for why these pathways may matter, and the extent to which they matter in different states with different programs should be studied in future research.

2015 - American Society of Criminology – 71st Annual Meeting Words: 106 words || 
Info
4. Sweeten, Gary. and Hannula, Kara. "Where You Start Affects Where You End Up: Using Start Values to Avoid Local Solutions in Group-Based Trajectory Models" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Society of Criminology – 71st Annual Meeting, Washington Hilton, Washington, DC, <Not Available>. 2020-02-22 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1032211_index.html>
Publication Type: Individual Paper
Abstract: Group-based trajectory models, a type of finite mixture model, are known to have difficult likelihood functions prone to the problem of local solutions where an algorithm converges to a local rather than a global maximum likelihood. Yet the possibility of local solutions is rarely discussed in the criminological literature and it is usually not clear what measures researchers take to avoid presenting sub-optimal solutions. We assess the degree to which start values matter for avoiding local solutions, and present four strategies for generating start values: 1) the stepping stone approach, 2) individual trajectory models, 3) bootstrap samples, and 4) random effects from growth curve models.

2006 - The Midwest Political Science Association Words: 32 words || 
Info
5. Karch, Andrew. "Smart Start or False Start? The Politics of American Preschool Education" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the The Midwest Political Science Association, Palmer House Hilton, Chicago, Illinois, <Not Available>. 2020-02-22 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p137309_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Abstract: Many countries operate centralized, universal preschool programs. In the United States, however, the national government plays only a limited role in this policy domain. What explains the shape of American preschool policy?

Pages: Previous - 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 ... 100 - Next  Jump:

©2020 All Academic, Inc.   |   All Academic Privacy Policy