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2015 - American Sociological Association Annual Meeting Pages: unavailable || Words: 14133 words || 
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1. Munsch, Christin. "Stigma, Status, and Singles: The Effect of Marital Status on Perceptions of the Unmarried" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Sociological Association Annual Meeting, Hilton Chicago and Palmer House Hilton, Chicago, Illinois, Aug 20, 2015 Online <PDF>. 2019-09-16 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1010013_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Singles are the emerging majority. Yet research on singles is surprisingly sparse. With the exception of single mothers, family scholars have focused almost exclusively on marriage, and more recently, cohabitation. The primary contribution of this article is to demonstrate the ways in which people draw on cultural beliefs about marital status to globally stigmatize singles, while simultaneously elevating their status in workplace contexts. Study 1 experimentally assesses the ways in which marital status and gender shape perceptions of middle-aged married and never married men and women. Study 2 experimentally manipulates marital status as well, but examines perceptions of middle-aged married, never married, and divorced men and women. Given that the percentage of African Americans who marry is relatively low, Study 2 also asks if the implications of being single vary by race. In Study 3, I shift the focus from stigma to status and ask if application materials for equally qualified job candidates who differ only on marital status are viewed differently. Studies 1 and 2 reveal that single is a highly stigmatized identity; however, study 2 finds that not all singles are viewed similarly. While both were stigmatized, never married singles were stigmatized more than divorced singles. Stigma did not depend on target’s race. In Study 3, I find that never married job applicants are believed to be more competent, committed, and available compared to otherwise identical job applicants. These perceived attributes do not, however, translate into greater organizational rewards.

2015 - American Sociological Association Annual Meeting Pages: unavailable || Words: 7198 words || 
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2. Lehpamer, Nicole. "The Effects of ADHD Status on Intimate Relationship Status and Quality" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Sociological Association Annual Meeting, Hilton Chicago and Palmer House Hilton, Chicago, Illinois, Aug 20, 2015 Online <PDF>. 2019-09-16 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1007637_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Individuals with Attention Deficit Hyperactive Disorder (ADHD) characteristically face challenges maintaining social relationships, including marriage. Past research has identified how ADHD increases divorce rates and marital quality. However, very little is known about the rates that individuals with ADHD participate in intimate relationships other than marriage and about how ADHD status influences the quality of these relationships. In response to these vacancies in the literature, this study applies stress and support theory, role theory, and economic theory to account for the effects of ADHD status on intimate relationship status and intimate relationship quality. It further uses these theoretical frameworks to examine how both relationship status and quality are influenced by how ADHD status interacts with sex as well as financial consequences of ADHD. This study uses data from the Physical Challenge and Health Study (PCHS) to compare marital status and quality between individuals who report and individuals who do not report ADHD characteristics, irrespective of partner characteristics. Results from basic and ordinal logistic regression models suggest that while individuals with ADHD experience intimate relationships at the same rate as individuals without it, individuals with ADHD report relatively lower relationship quality. Results also suggest that females with ADHD report lower marital quality than individuals with ADHD who are male. Economic hardship does not moderate the relationships between ADHD status and relationship status and quality, ultimately deeming stress/social support theory and role theory, rather than economic theory, more compelling theoretical frameworks explaining the relationship between ADHD and intimate relationships.

2017 - Annual Scientific Meeting of the International Society of Political Psychology Words: 191 words || 
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3. Johne, Sylvia. "Competing for status: the influence of competition and Social Dominance Orientation on low-status group member’s rating in a scholarship application scenario." Paper presented at the annual meeting of the Annual Scientific Meeting of the International Society of Political Psychology, The Royal College of Surgeons Edinburgh, Edinburgh, Scotland, U.K., Jun 29, 2017 <Not Available>. 2019-09-16 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1254388_index.html>
Publication Type: Poster
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: The motivational and ideological basis for the discrimination of low-status groups has been thoroughly theorised by the Dual Process Model (Duckitt, 2001). Based on this theory, the present research investigates how competition influences the discrimination of low-status group members in comparison to high-status group members as a function of their competence and secondly, how this effect is moderated by Social Dominance Orientation (SDO). Participants (N = 398) each rated four target profiles differing in status and competence on their overall suitability, competence and future progress in either a low or highly competitive fictitious scholarship application scenario. Using crossed effects multilevel modeling, results revealed lower ratings in overall suitability for high-status group members in comparison to low-status group members depending on their competence levels. Ratings in suitability and competence, but not future progress, were negatively associated with SDO and competition. However, a moderating effect of SDO was not supported. The findings suggest a detrimental effect for members of a high-status group displaying low levels of competence in a highly competitive application situation, with the opposite effect for low-status group members displaying high levels of competence - indicating a possible affirmative action effect.

2017 - American Sociological Association Annual Meeting Pages: unavailable || Words: unavailable || 
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4. Jung, Wooseok. "Status Rebellion: When Lower Status Firms Differentiate Pro Bono Reward Strategy" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Sociological Association Annual Meeting, Palais des Congrès de Montréal, Montreal, Canada, Aug 12, 2017 Online <APPLICATION/PDF>. 2019-09-16 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1251611_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: In studying organizational adaptation, past research has demonstrated that an actor’s status produces distinctive motivation for organizational conformity. However, the current literature provides little explanation about behavioral decisions when an actor’s understanding of social standing is ambiguous. By taking a dyadic perspective, this study investigates how inter-firm status similarity affects management differentiation. Using the empirical context of the U.S. law firm pro bono reward policy expansion, I show that a law firm makes a distinctive decision in reward program design according to its relative status position with respect to its market competitors. When a law firm realizes lower status compared to its competitor, the firm tends to imitate the reward policy of the higher status competitor. However, without a clear distinction in status hierarchy, a lower status firm is more prone to differentiate its reward program with respect to its higher status rival. Furthermore, I show that the influence of status similarity is moderated by the common audience shared by rival firms. If two law firms share common corporate clients, the positive effect of status similarity on differentiation is dramatically increased.

2009 - American Sociological Association Annual Meeting Pages: 37 pages || Words: 11789 words || 
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5. Bianchi, Alison., Kang, Soong. and Stewart, Daniel. "Social Status in an Open Source Community: A Status Characteristics Perspective" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Sociological Association Annual Meeting, Hilton San Francisco, San Francisco, CA, Aug 08, 2009 Online <PDF>. 2019-09-16 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p309382_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Open source software is developed by Internet-based communities of self-organized volunteer software programmers distributed worldwide, and usually, it is made freely available to the public. We examine the social dynamics of one such community, Advogato.org, whose mission is to provide computer programmers with a space to connect with other programmers to work with them on software projects, to develop their software prowess, and to have their performance evaluated by other programmers using a peer certification system. We submit that during programming projects, status generalization is creeping into group project dynamics, and is part of the peer certification that occurs after project completion. Using software that we developed, we randomly scraped the websites of Advogato.org members to capture the performance evaluations of members and other status information to determine if status characteristics were associated with levels of these performance evaluations, which are markers of members’ social status. We found that in our sample (N=291), controlling for formal role position and number of contributions to other projects, age and being from a high-tech location were significantly associated with social status, and are diffuse status characteristics for this organization. Level of education was not associated with social status. Also, years of programming experience was associated with social status, and is thus a proxy for the specific status characteristic “computer programming ability”. Theoretical strategies for capturing organizational level processes that bound the salience of status characteristics are discussed, as are intervention strategies to eliminate the deleterious effects of diffuse status characteristics within this organization.

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