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2011 - International Studies Association Annual Conference "Global Governance: Political Authority in Transition" Pages: 13 pages || Words: 4958 words || 
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1. Lilja, Mona. and Baaz, Mikael. "The Extraordinary Chambers in the Courts of Cambodia and the (Re)construction of Cambodian Society: One Step Forward, One Step Back or One Step Forward and Two Steps Back?" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the International Studies Association Annual Conference "Global Governance: Political Authority in Transition", Le Centre Sheraton Montreal Hotel, MONTREAL, QUEBEC, CANADA, Mar 16, 2011 Online <APPLICATION/PDF>. 2019-10-15 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p500427_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: The Extraordinary Chambers in the Courts of Cambodia (ECCC) – an heir to the International Military Tribunal for Major War Criminals at Nuremberg – is national court established pursuant to an agreement between the Cambodian government and the United Nations to try key Khmer Rouge (KR) officials for serious violations of Cambodian penal law, international humanitarian law and crimes against humanity committed between 17 April 1975 and 6 January 1979. On 26 July 2010, the verdict in Case 001 concerning Kaing Guek Eav will be announced.

Ever since its inception, critical voices have been raised concerning ECCC possibilities. Among the reservations stands out: (i) that the tribunal is located in a country that struggles with a “hybrid” democratic systems of rule. Thus the legal system, that provides the base for the tribunal, is weak; and, (ii) that a Court with the aim of bringing the perpetrators of war crimes and crimes against humanity to justice do in fact legitimise a semi-democratic regime that once was party to the crimes. Moreover, the Cambodian government, in reverse, also contributes to legitimise the UN, which in fact continued to support the KR insurgence until the early 1990s. This paper aims to explore these reservations.

2009 - NCA 95th Annual Convention Words: 151 words || 
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2. Ribarsky, Elizabeth. and LeClair-Underberg, Cassandra. "Stepping into Changes in Sources of Sexual Information: Examining Step-Parent-Step-Child Communication about Sex" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the NCA 95th Annual Convention, Chicago Hilton & Towers, Chicago, IL, <Not Available>. 2019-10-15 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p366261_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Abstract: Parents play a vital role in influencing their children’s views of sex and sexuality. However, the dynamics of the American family have changed dramatically in the last 20 years. In particular, researchers have estimated that nearly one-third of American children will spend at least part of their childhood living with a step-parent. The ever-growing prevalence of step-families has forced researchers to question how these changes have influenced the stability of discourse within the family, including regarding sexual information. As many step-parents play just as an important role as a biological parent in influencing a child, it is important to examine what role, if any, step-parents play in providing information and shaping children’s views about sex and sexuality. This study provides a comparison of step-children’s perceptions of sexual communication with their biological and step-parents and raises implications regarding step-parents as a new source and method of obtaining information about sex and sexuality.

2007 - American Sociological Association Pages: 20 pages || Words: 5064 words || 
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3. Villalon, Roberta. "One Step Forward, Two Steps Back: Latina Immigrant Survivors of Domestic Violence, Nonprofits, and the State" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Sociological Association, TBA, New York, New York City, Aug 11, 2007 Online <PDF>. 2019-10-15 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p178093_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Abstract: The Violence Against Women Act and nonprofit organizations representing immigrant survivors of domestic violence are conceived as counter-state and progressive institutions. Based on empirical data collected through participant observations and personal interviews in Central Texas, I show the opposite. While Latina battered immigrants are entitled to access citizenship by law, the bureaucratic process, structured by the state and navigated by nonprofits, filters survivors as legitimate or illegitimate petitioners. Simultaneously, disciplines of citizenship, and class, racial/ethnic and gender lines intervene in the path to become a citizen of the United States. In this paper, I focus on the structuring forces of the state and its formal and informal agents (including nonprofit workers) over battered immigrants as they claim for citizenship.

2004 - International Studies Association Words: 87 words || 
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4. Joshi, Devin. "One Step Backwards, Two Steps Forward: The Impact of September 11th on the Transnational Anti-Globalization Movement" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the International Studies Association, Le Centre Sheraton Hotel, Montreal, Quebec, Canada, Mar 17, 2004 <Not Available>. 2019-10-15 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p73336_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: The dreaful events of September 11th and their aftermath have had a paradoxically reinvigorating effect upon the transnational anti-globalization movement. On the one hand the movement has reinvented itself into the marginally influential anti-war movement highlighted by the global February 15th demonstrations. On the other hand increasing frame unification, discursive convergence, and independent media utilization has refocused the network's position(s) on its stance and tactics for reshaping the global economy. Initial signs that this international anti-hegemonic movement from below is receding may be misleading.

2014 - Comparative and International Education Society Annual Conference Words: 251 words || 
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5. Wagner, Maryam., Jang, Eunice., Cummins, Jim. and Stille, Saskia. "A standards-based assessment approach for advancing education of English language learners: The case of Steps to English Proficiency (STEP)" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the Comparative and International Education Society Annual Conference, Sheraton Centre Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada, <Not Available>. 2019-10-15 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p718194_index.html>
Publication Type: Panel Paper
Abstract: Increasing worldwide immigration is reflected in classrooms which comprise diverse learners studying English as an additional language. For example, in Ontario, Canada over 25% of the K-12 student population comprises English language learners, all of whom require instruction to facilitate their language development. Supporting students’ language development needs to be a shared responsibility among all educators and necessitates continual instruction, monitoring and assessment. This assessment may be facilitated through standards-based approaches in which students’ language development is tracked based on their performance on classroom tasks, not only their test performance (Brindley, 2001). This policy-supported practice (Llosa, 2011) is exemplified worldwide through the use of: the National Languages and Literacy Institute of Australia ESL Bandscales (McKay, Hudson, & Sapuppo, 1994), the Common European Framework of Reference for Languages (Council of Europe, 2001) in Europe, and Steps to English Proficiency (STEP) in Canada. This paper highlights the use and potential of such standards-based assessments by drawing from a multi-year validation of STEP involving administrators, teachers, and students, which examined the quality of the assessment framework and its use. Our findings demonstrated the impact of STEP on student, teachers, and system-wide. Specifically, the heterogeneity and complexity of students’ language development was better understood leading to provision of individualized and differentiated instructional support. Teachers gained much-needed professional development, adopted a common language of reference to collaborate, and systematically integrated assessment into instruction. Additionally, the use of STEP resulted in enhanced accountability, and allocation of resources to support a system-wide implementation of the assessment framework.

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