Guest  

 
Search: 
Search By: SubjectAbstractAuthorTitleFull-Text

 

Showing 1 through 5 of 71 records.
Pages: Previous - 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 ... 15 - Next  Jump:
2005 - The Law and Society Words: 75 words || 
Info
1. Heminway, Joan. "Martha Stewart Saved!: Insider Liability for Undisclosed Personal Facts and Transactions" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the The Law and Society, J.W. Marriott Resort, Las Vegas, NV, <Not Available>. 2020-02-22 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p18314_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Abstract: This paper explores the bases for, and probability of, individual securities fraud liability under Rule 10b-5 (under the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, as amended) of a corporate insider for undisclosed personal facts and transactions that may impact the corporation's stock price. The paper focuses on the public company context and uses the dismissed securities fraud claim from the recent criminal enforcement action against Martha Stewart as a jumping-off point for its analysis.

2006 - American Studies Association Words: 444 words || 
Info
2. Bryant, William. "Outlaws in Space: Stewart Brand, Space Colonies, and the Techno-Ecological Future" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Studies Association, <Not Available>. 2020-02-22 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p114422_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Abstract: For a while, in the nineteen-seventies, Whole Earth Catalog founder Stewart Brand was excited by the prospect of building space colonies. Given the problems besetting planet Earth, it seemed a reasonable, possibly even vital, thing to do: construct enormous satellites out of material mined from the moon and from asteroids; set them afloat between Earth and moon; establish within them self-sustaining communities of up to a million people, who would grow their own food, build their own economies, reinvent the relationship among people, nature, and machines, and possibly even, in Brand’s words, “get it right this time.” My presentation explores the space colonies idea in the context of Brand’s broader, long-standing search for a future capable of sustaining both technological progress and ecological survival.
The idea of building space colonies belonged to Gerard O’Neill, a Princeton University physicist who, in 1969, had challenged a group of students with this question: “Is the surface of the planet really the right place for an expanding technological civilization?” Given the polluted, over-crowded, energy-depleted state of planet Earth, the answer seemed to be no.
Brand wasn’t the only one interested in O’Neill’s idea. So were the press, politicians such as California governor Jerry Brown, and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration, among others. But it was Brand who provided a forum for the most engaged and sustained exploration of the idea. He introduced O’Neill and space colonies to the readers of his magazine, CoEvolution Quarterly, in 1974. There followed a lively exchange among readers, scientists, cultural figures, religious leaders and many others. Some, like writer Wendell Barry, thought the idea a misbegotten scheme to extend all the destructive forces of modern civilization into outer space. Others, like O’Neill himself, believed space colonies could relieve population and resource scarcity problems on Earth, and provide humankind with a means for continued, even unlimited, economic and technological growth, beyond the limitations of their small, finite home planet. For Brand, however, the space colonies idea held potential for fulfilling his dream of a new kind of cultural space – an “outlaw area,” in Buckminster Fuller’s term – in which self-directed, self-starting individuals might be free to remake civilization. Like experimental communes before them, space colonies were, for Brand, a potential venue for reconfiguring the relationship among people, nature, and machines.
In the nineteen-eighties, cyberspace replaced outer space as Brand’s leading-edge “outlaw area.” There are significant continuities in how Brand imagined space colonies and how he came to define a discourse of information technologies. I argue that we get a better understanding of the discourse of global networked information culture when we set it against an earlier dream of techno-ecological civilizations in space.

2007 - Southern Political Science Association Words: 133 words || 
Info
3. Koloen, Glory. "Media Influence on Political Attitudes: A Comparative Analysis of the Presentation Style Affects of The Daily Show with John Stewart versus Network News" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the Southern Political Science Association, Hotel InterContinental, New Orleans, LA, Jan 03, 2007 <Not Available>. 2020-02-22 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p143820_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Abstract: Scholars and pundits alike have expressed concern about the impact of mediated political information sources such as The Daily Show with John Stewart on political attitudes and behavior. This experiment addresses the question of whether or not presentation style has a significant impact on political perceptions and attitude formation. Particularly, whether or not context leads to decreased political efficacy and increased cynicism for those exposed to The Daily Show compared to the attitudes expressed by people exposed to traditional network news. Initial findings suggest that although cynicism and external efficacy may be influenced by the presentation style of The Daily Show, it is possible that due to suspected co-activation of the appetitive and aversive emotional systems, increased cynicism and decreased efficacy may not result in a greater sense of political disempowerment.

2008 - International Communication Association Pages: 24 pages || Words: 5961 words || 
Info
4. Cao, Xiaoxia. "Learning From Jon Stewart: How Soft News Programs Inform Infrequent Consumers of Traditional News" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the International Communication Association, TBA, Montreal, Quebec, Canada, May 21, 2008 Online <APPLICATION/PDF>. 2020-02-22 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p231648_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Abstract: This study uses The Daily Show with Jon Stewart as a case study to examine the impact of exposure to soft news programs—that frequently cover politics—on political knowledge among citizens with different levels of traditional news consumption. Using the 2002 and 2004 Pew Media Consumption Surveys, I found that watching the show was positively related to political knowledge on the part of viewers who normally did not consume traditional news in 2002; the positive relationship diminished as traditional news consumption increased among show viewers. The interactive effect between The Daily Show viewing and exposure to traditional news sources was not statistically significant in 2004, however. My findings suggest that programs like The Daily Show could help to reduce the knowledge gap between news junkies and those who normally do not watch traditional news programs.

2008 - NCA 94th Annual Convention Pages: 21 pages || Words: 6034 words || 
Info
5. Schuchard, Justine. "Looking at Truthiness: The Daily Show with Jon Stewart and Questions of Authenticity and Authority in Contemporary Visual Culture" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the NCA 94th Annual Convention, TBA, San Diego, CA, Nov 20, 2008 Online <PDF>. 2020-02-22 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p257707_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Abstract: This paper analyzes The Daily Show with Jon Stewart and its critique of American visual culture. When the media and political industries can no longer be trusted to present authentic, credible information, individuals must sort out the facts from the face value. To help viewers confront this problem, The Daily Show exposes "images as truthiness" as absurd and reveals that there is often little truth in the images we see in mainstream media.

Pages: Previous - 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 ... 15 - Next  Jump:

©2020 All Academic, Inc.   |   All Academic Privacy Policy