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2017 - ICA's 67th Annual Conference Pages: unavailable || Words: unavailable || 
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1. Kwesell, Allison. and Jung, Joo-Young. "Stigma as a Medium for Intergroup Relations: Fukushima Residents’ Perceptions of Stigma Following Japan’s 2011 Nuclear Disaster" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the ICA's 67th Annual Conference, Hilton San Diego Bayfront, San Diego, USA, May 25, 2017 Online <APPLICATION/PDF>. 2019-09-22 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1229282_index.html>
Publication Type: Extended Abstract
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: This research analyzes multi-dimensional attributes of stigma as divisive mechanisms in intergroup relations in the aftermath of the Fukushima nuclear disaster in Japan. After the disaster, Fukushima residents expressed felt prejudice and discrimination from people outside of Fukushima. As part of ongoing research on communication and community in Fukushima, this study examined how residents perceived stigmas imposed on them and the sources that shaped their perceptions. Research results indicated that residents perceived stigmas as a phenomenon created and infringed upon them from outsiders, which was expressed in affective, cognitive and behavioral dimensions. Multiple sources, such as media, interpersonal contacts, and government shaped stigma perceptions. Despite many negative perceptions, residents also expressed clarified values, a more supportive community, changed priorities and new future goals. Implications of the results in intergroup relations and conflicts are discussed.

2008 - American Sociological Association Annual Meeting Pages: 35 pages || Words: 9887 words || 
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2. Harkness, Sarah. and Kroska, Amy. "Coping with the Stigma of Mental Illness: Exploring the Role of Stigma Sentiments and Diagnosis" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Sociological Association Annual Meeting, Sheraton Boston and the Boston Marriott Copley Place, Boston, MA, Jul 31, 2008 Online <PDF>. 2019-09-22 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p241465_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Abstract: According to the modified labeling theory of mental illness, stigma beliefs–the expectation that individuals will devalue and discriminate against psychiatric patients–should increase patients’ use of three coping behaviors: concealing treatment history, educating others about mental illness, and withdrawing from social interaction. Using Interact, a computerized version of affect control theory that simulates social interaction, we examine the way that stigma sentiments (evaluation, potency, and activity associated with the cultural category “a mentally ill person”) and diagnostic category (adjustment, affective, and schizophrenic) jointly shape the expected use of these behaviors. As predicted, stigma sentiments increase affective patients’ expected use of these coping behaviors, but contrary to predictions, stigma sentiments reduce adjustment and schizophrenic patients’ expected use of these behaviors. Diagnosis also affects patients’ coping style: schizophrenic patients are predicted to educate more often than they conceal or withdraw, while adjustment and affective patients are predicted to conceal and withdraw more often than educate. Also, consistent with predictions, stigma sentiments increase patients’ expected use of education over secrecy and withdrawal. However, we also found that diagnostic category shapes the relationship between stigma sentiments and expected use of specific coping behaviors, with the affective patient results matching predictions most closely.

2013 - American Sociological Association Annual Meeting Pages: unavailable || Words: 9976 words || 
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3. Hendrix, Kimber. "Weight Stigma during Adolescence: How does Stigma Mediate the Relationship between Obesity and Depressive Symptoms?" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Sociological Association Annual Meeting, Hilton New York and Sheraton New York, New York, NY, Aug 09, 2013 Online <PDF>. 2019-09-22 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p649752_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Throughout the life course, stigma associated with obesity potentially affects depressive symptoms. Past research documents an association between overweight/obese status and depressive symptoms, rarely exploring mediating mechanisms and relying on overweight/obese status alone to explain the relationship. Using a longitudinal, community study of adolescents and integrating a stigma identity threat model to function as a mediator between overweight/obese status and depressive symptoms, this study aims to: (1) identify specific components of the stigma identity, and using that multi-faceted conception of stigma, (2) identify mediators that explicate the relationship between overweight/obese status and depressive symptoms. Findings indicate an association between overweight/obese status and depressive symptoms as mediated by a stigma identity for both males and females, but at different time points. In females, the mediating effects of their stigma identity between overweight/obese status and depressive symptoms appear more significant during earlier waves compared to later. In males, the only statistically significant relationship emerges at wave three where a positive effect exists between overweight/obese status and a stigma identity, but a negative relationship exists between stigma identity and depressive symptoms.

2008 - International Communication Association Pages: 1 pages || Words: 48 words || 
Info
4. Nadorff, P.., Lee, Sungkyoung., Wilson, Brian., Lang, Annie., Pescosolido, Bernice. and Martin, Jack. "Mass Media and Stigma: How Portrayals of Mental Illness Impact Social Stigma" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the International Communication Association, TBA, Montreal, Quebec, Canada, May 21, 2008 Online <APPLICATION/PDF>. 2019-09-22 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p233227_index.html>
Publication Type: Extended Abstract
Abstract: This paper will report the results of two experiments investigating the online processing of emotional messages containing characters with mental illness. The first experiment asks how much personal experience with persons with metnal illness influences the processing of televised messages about mental illness. Cognitive and physiological responses while viewing of negative and positive portrayals of mental illness are measured. Participants who vary in terms of the amount of positive or negative contact they have in their daily lives with persons with mental illness were recruited from a county wide random survey. The second experiment assesses the short and medium term effects of viewing negative or positive portrayals of people with mental illness on stigmatizing attitudes.

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