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2015 - SRCD Biennial Meeting Words: 495 words || 
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1. Silke, Charlotte., Heary, Caroline. and Swords, Lorraine. "Mental Health Stigma: Using Factor Analysis to Develop an Empirical Model of Mental Health Stigma in Adolescents" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the SRCD Biennial Meeting, Pennsylvania Convention Center and the Philadelphia Marriott Downtown Hotel, Philadelphia, PA, Mar 19, 2015 <Not Available>. 2019-04-19 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p959863_index.html>
Publication Type: Individual Poster
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: BACKGROUND: Mental Illness Stigma is regarded as a critical barrier to mental health treatment access and contributes to a devalued sense of self among individuals experiencing mental health concerns (Elkington et al., 2012). Understanding and reducing mental health stigma in adolescents have been identified as priority areas for policy makers, social researchers and clinical practitioners (Pinto et al., 2012). However, research into the area of mental health stigma in adolescents is hampered by a lack of reliable and valid instruments that confidently measure mental illness stigma among adolescents. Additionally, stigma is theoretically conceptualised as being composed of three inter-related psychological processes: Stereotypes, Prejudice and Behaviour (Corrigan et al., 2010). Although this theoretical model is widely purported in the mental health stigma literature, there is no empirical evidence to support the conceptual framework of this model among adolescents. Hence, the aim of the current study was to establish a valid and reliable measurement of mental health stigma among adolescents and to use these measures to examine the empirical structure of mental health stigma. METHOD: Based on a review of the literature, numerous measures were selected to ensure that all three components of mental illness stigma (stereotypes, prejudice and behaviour) were adequately represented. An Exploratory Factor Analysis (EFA) was performed on 332 adolescents to specify the most parsimonious factor structure of these selected stigma measures. A Confirmatory Factor Analysis (CFA) was then conducted on a separate 236 adolescents to evaluate the validity of the factor structure derived from the EFA. Finally, a higher order CFA model was expressed in order to assess whether these measures converged onto the three latent constructs, Stereotypes, Prejudice and Behaviour, and whether these latent constructs in turn converged onto one higher order factor; stigma. RESULTS: The EFA returned a final seven-factor solution of mental illness stigma. Specifically, four factors represented Stereotypes; one factor represented Prejudice and; two factors represented Behaviour. All factor loadings ranged from .52 to .85. All scales evidenced good reliability (e.g., α=.73-.93). For the first order CFA model, the two Behaviour factors evidenced signs of multi-collinearity (i.e., r = 1.025) and thus were collapsed together to form a one factor Behaviour component. This six-factor model of mental illness stigma evidenced good model fit; χ2 (569) = 815.49, p < .001; Q = 1.43; RMSEA = .043 (90% CI: .04, .05); CFI = .918; TLI = .909, SRMR = .06 and AIC = 17022.08, Δ AIC = 16.04.The higher order model also showed good fit and was not found to differ significantly from the first order model; χ2 (577) = 834.02, p < .001; Q = 1.45; RMSEA = .043 (90% CI: .04, .05); CFI = .914; TLI = .90717, SRMR = .06 and AIC = 17024.61, Δ AIC = 2.53. DISCUSSION: The results from this study highlight the importance of establishing validity and reliability for the measures used to assess mental health stigma in adolescents and provide empirical support for the theoretical conceptualisation of mental health stigma.

2017 - AEJMC Pages: unavailable || Words: 10404 words || 
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2. Jankowski, Stacie. "The Stigma Factor: How Stigma Attitudes Moderate Emotional Responses to Health Message Frames" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the AEJMC, Chicago Marriott Downtown Magnificent Mile, Chicago, IL, Aug 09, 2017 Online <APPLICATION/PDF>. 2019-04-19 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1282208_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: There has been much work about the ways media influences stigma; however, there is little research examining how stigma impacts the ways audiences think and feel about different media stories about health issues. This study begins to answer questions about the ways emotions and individual differences interact with framing effects. Using common frames in health news stories: Iyengar’s (1991) thematic (societal factors) and episodic (individual experience) frames as well as gain (benefits) and loss (consequences) frames, this study utilized a 2 (thematic/episodic frame) x 2 (gain/loss frame) between-groups factorial design to examine whether stigma moderated framing’s impact on the emotions of anger, sadness, and fear. Results found that certain characteristics of stigma do moderate framing’s impact on emotion readers felt when reading stories about obesity and depression, indicating stigma’s importance as a consideration for message creation by journalists and health communicators.

2017 - ICA's 67th Annual Conference Pages: unavailable || Words: unavailable || 
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3. Kwesell, Allison. and Jung, Joo-Young. "Stigma as a Medium for Intergroup Relations: Fukushima Residents’ Perceptions of Stigma Following Japan’s 2011 Nuclear Disaster" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the ICA's 67th Annual Conference, Hilton San Diego Bayfront, San Diego, USA, May 25, 2017 Online <APPLICATION/PDF>. 2019-04-19 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1229282_index.html>
Publication Type: Extended Abstract
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: This research analyzes multi-dimensional attributes of stigma as divisive mechanisms in intergroup relations in the aftermath of the Fukushima nuclear disaster in Japan. After the disaster, Fukushima residents expressed felt prejudice and discrimination from people outside of Fukushima. As part of ongoing research on communication and community in Fukushima, this study examined how residents perceived stigmas imposed on them and the sources that shaped their perceptions. Research results indicated that residents perceived stigmas as a phenomenon created and infringed upon them from outsiders, which was expressed in affective, cognitive and behavioral dimensions. Multiple sources, such as media, interpersonal contacts, and government shaped stigma perceptions. Despite many negative perceptions, residents also expressed clarified values, a more supportive community, changed priorities and new future goals. Implications of the results in intergroup relations and conflicts are discussed.

2013 - American Sociological Association Annual Meeting Pages: unavailable || Words: 9976 words || 
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4. Hendrix, Kimber. "Weight Stigma during Adolescence: How does Stigma Mediate the Relationship between Obesity and Depressive Symptoms?" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Sociological Association Annual Meeting, Hilton New York and Sheraton New York, New York, NY, Aug 09, 2013 Online <PDF>. 2019-04-19 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p649752_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Throughout the life course, stigma associated with obesity potentially affects depressive symptoms. Past research documents an association between overweight/obese status and depressive symptoms, rarely exploring mediating mechanisms and relying on overweight/obese status alone to explain the relationship. Using a longitudinal, community study of adolescents and integrating a stigma identity threat model to function as a mediator between overweight/obese status and depressive symptoms, this study aims to: (1) identify specific components of the stigma identity, and using that multi-faceted conception of stigma, (2) identify mediators that explicate the relationship between overweight/obese status and depressive symptoms. Findings indicate an association between overweight/obese status and depressive symptoms as mediated by a stigma identity for both males and females, but at different time points. In females, the mediating effects of their stigma identity between overweight/obese status and depressive symptoms appear more significant during earlier waves compared to later. In males, the only statistically significant relationship emerges at wave three where a positive effect exists between overweight/obese status and a stigma identity, but a negative relationship exists between stigma identity and depressive symptoms.

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