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2008 - Southern Political Science Association Words: 76 words || 
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1. Mendez, Jesse. "The Storm after the Storm: Governmental Response to Displaced Hurricane Students" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the Southern Political Science Association, Hotel Intercontinental, New Orleans, LA, Jan 09, 2008 <Not Available>. 2018-07-15 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p228557_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Abstract: In a project being funded by the Center for the Study of Disaster and Emergency Events (CSDEE), this paper examines both state and federal reaction in addressing the educational needs of displaced K-12 students in areas affected by Hurricanes Katrina and Rita. By focusing on the actions of federal and selected state legislatures, this study provides a synopsis and analysis of the varying approaches utilized by various governmental agencies in accommodating the influx of displaced students.

2007 - Southern Political Science Association Pages: 30 pages || Words: 4495 words || 
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2. Windett, Jason. "An Imperfect Storm: Analyzing Presidential- Congressional Relations and Environment." Paper presented at the annual meeting of the Southern Political Science Association, Hotel InterContinental, New Orleans, LA, Jan 03, 2007 <Not Available>. 2018-07-15 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p143122_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Abstract: The working relationship that exists between the American executive branch and legislative branches has been called “separated institutions sharing powers.” Due to the complexity of this relationship, it is difficult to gauge and understand the constant power struggle that exists between these two powerful governmental institutions. This difficulty in analysis leads me to ask what environmental variables significantly affect the relationship between Congress and the President. In this manuscript, I examine this relationship by measuring the influence of several theoretically significant environmental factors which are hypothesized to change the behavior of both branches. Using a number of variables including Poole-Rosenthal scores, party control of Congress, divided versus unified government, Southern Democrat identification, Conservative Coalition membership, and Gallup Poll data of Presidential public approval, I analyze what determines Presidential success (measured as Presidential Support Scores) in passing legislation, the use of the Presidential veto as a response to limit Congressional power, and the number of vetoes a President has overridden by Congress. Unlike most previous works, rather than focusing on a single year or session of Congress, the variables are measured on a month to month basis in order to better show the true fluctuations and effects on Presidential Support. More specifically, this manuscript examines the interaction between the President and Congress, and not just one branch attempting to dominate the other. Preliminary analyses indicate a strategic relationship between the President and Congress that constantly changes as the political environment changes. Each branch becomes opportunistic when the other shows weakness or signs of public disapproval.

2007 - SOIL AND WATER CONSERVATION SOCIETY Words: 253 words || 
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3. Potter, Steven. and Williams, Jimmy. "Simulated effects of changes in the precipitation regime on storm runoff and nutrient losses from farm fields in the Great Lakes region" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the SOIL AND WATER CONSERVATION SOCIETY, Saddlebrook Resort, Tampa, Florida, Jul 21, 2007 <Not Available>. 2018-07-15 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p174123_index.html>
Publication Type: Oral Presentation
Abstract: Increasing population, urban encroachment, and conversions of land for food production into biofuel production may lead to fragile lands moving into crop production and the better farmland becoming less resilient. Potential climate change effects including increased precipitation intensity or more frequent low probability storm events add further stresses. This poses challenges into the future since fragile lands are more susceptible to runoff during major hydrologic events. In a modeling experiment, we examined potential climate change effects on storm runoff and associated nutrient transport from cultivated cropland in the U.S Great Lakes region. Two climate change scenarios covering 4.9 million hectares were simulated for a 40-year period using the APEX model. Scenario E1015 simulates a 10% increase in mean monthly precipitation and a 15% increase in the maximum half-hour precipitation. Scenario E25 simulates a 25% increase in the maximum half-hour precipitation. Compared to a baseline simulation, average annual runoff increases 29% and 42% for E1015 and E25 respectively. Average annual nitrogen losses increase 27% and 37% while phosphorus losses increase 38% and 65%. Investigations indicate fields with the most storm runoff and nutrient losses in the baseline generally have greater than average increases in runoff and nutrient losses in the scenarios. Specific fields designated as “most fragile” shifts somewhat between the simulations. Analysis indicates some lands that are fairly resilient under current conditions become some of the most fragile under a changed precipitation regime. Thus, assessment of conservation needs that do not account for climate change may underestimate the need for conservation practices.

2008 - International Congress for Conservation Biology Words: 243 words || 
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4. Weeks, Brian., Hamburg, Steven. and Vadeboncoeur, Matthew. "ICE STORM IMPACTS ON THE CANOPY STRUCTURE OF A NORTHERN HARDWOOD FOREST" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the International Congress for Conservation Biology, Convention Center, Chattanooga, TN, Jul 10, 2008 <Not Available>. 2018-07-15 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p243765_index.html>
Publication Type: Abstract
Abstract: In 2005, we quantified changes in foliage-height profiles in the canopy of a northern hardwood forest at the 3,160 ha Hubbard Brook Experimental Forest, New Hampshire, after a severe ice storm in 1998. We predicted that the ice storm would allow increased American beech (Fagus grandifolia) recruitment and recovery, in part due to the prevalence of beech bark disease, which increased beech root sprouting prior to the storm. Data were collected in 15x15 m plots established in 1998 to assess storm damage, with 22 in damaged areas and 10 in undamaged control areas. Foliage-height profiles were created using a point-quadrat approach to sample leaf heights, and a pole-mounted leaf area index (LAI) sensor to measure LAI at 1 m intervals up to 10 m. We confirmed findings from 2000 that the total LAI in damaged areas had returned to estimated pre-storm levels, but found roughly 15% more of total LAI between 6-10 m in damaged canopies. By correlating leaf height and tree DBH, we determined that trees with DBH of 10-16 cm contributed the increased leaf area. Using vegetation inventory data from 1997 and 2002, we found a significantly greater increase in the density of beech with DBH of 10-16 cm in damaged areas. Foliage-height profiles can impact rates of transpiration and photosynthesis, canopy nutrient content, and bird community composition. Increased beech density is likely to decrease forest biomass, foliar concentrations of base cations and N, and the economic value of the forest.

2009 - UCEA Annual Convention Pages: unavailable || Words: 2234 words || 
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5. Martinez, Sylvia., Brown, Shelmon., Carne, Glenda., Lamphere, Mike., Samuels, Dena. and Weathers, John. "The Eye of the Storm and MississippI Gulf Coast Education: The Role of Community" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the UCEA Annual Convention, Anaheim Marriott, Anaheim, California, Nov 19, 2009 Online <PDF>. 2018-07-15 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p378435_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: The purpose of this study was to explore how Hurricane Katrina affected the educational system of the Mississippi Gulf Coast and how district administrators and the broader community responded to this crisis. Through interviews, superintendants of the coastal and adjacent counties on the Gulf Coast shared their stories of rebuilding and reopening schools in the aftermath of Hurricane Katrina. Through the constant comparative method of content analysis, two themes emerged: community building and community pride and resiliency.

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