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2014 - Tenth Annual Congress of Qualitative Inquiry Words: 150 words || 
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1. Stuij, Mirjam., Elling-Machartzki, Agnes. and Abma, Tineke. "Beyond the Restitution Narrative: Storylines About Sport, Health and Illness of People with Diabetes" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the Tenth Annual Congress of Qualitative Inquiry, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, Illinois, May 21, 2014 <Not Available>. 2019-10-17 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p727205_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Our study focuses on different storylines about sport, health and illness of people with diabetes. In the dominant storyline, i.e. the restitution narrative, sport and physical activity can have a positive meaning, both as a means and a marker. A diagnosis like diabetes, however, may also signify a confrontation with formerly taken-for-granted life and bodily ability. Consequently, people negotiate and possibly reconstruct (integrated) meanings of illness and sport in their daily life. The acceptance or resistance of the restitution narrative and construction of possible counter-narratives is not a solely individual process, but a cultural and socio-political one. Following Sparkes, we are interested in expanding ‘the cultural repertoire of illness stories in sport’ beyond the restitution narrative. In our ongoing study based on narrative inquiry, we collect and analyze ‘sport-illness life histories’ of people with diabetes. We will present the first results and indicate which narrative tensions occur in these stories.

2015 - Eleventh International Congress of Qualitative Inquiry Words: 148 words || 
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2. Wisse, Ester. and Elling-Machartzki, Agnes. "Sport-health-illness storyline analysis of people living with hiv" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the Eleventh International Congress of Qualitative Inquiry, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, Illinois, May 20, 2015 <Not Available>. 2019-10-17 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p992319_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Our study focuses on different storylines about sport, health and illness of people with hiv. Although hiv is well treatable in the Western world, having hiv still contains a stigma and the diagnose can imply confrontation with formerly taken-for-granted life and sometimes also bodily ability. To cope with this and to diminish the side effects of medication, people with hiv are advised to be physically active. This advise fits into the dominant restitution narrative, in which sport and physical activity have a positive meaning. However, narrative interviews with around 20 people with hiv living in the Netherlands indicated that people differ in how they negotiate and reconstruct (integrated) meanings of illness and sport in their daily life. By using the method of storyline analysis from Murray & Sools we try to go beyond the restitution narrative and display the different sport-health illness stories from people living with hiv.

2016 - American Political Science Association Annual Meeting Pages: unavailable || Words: unavailable || 
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3. Zhou, Jack. "Hot Takes: How (and why) Climate Change Storylines Change in American Politics" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Political Science Association Annual Meeting, TBA, Philadelphia, PA, Aug 31, 2016 <Not Available>. 2019-10-17 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1126933_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: The history of climate change in American politics is characterized by conflict. For decades, the issue has been split along fierce lines of contention between advocates, who support taking action against climate change, and skeptics, who argue that such action is unnecessary, not worthwhile, or that the issue does not exist in the first place. This acrimonious setting has grown to the point that multiple historical accounts of American climate change politics refer to it as “the Climate War.” However, the substance and flavor of climate change-related conflict are not static, but have instead continuously evolved over the issue’s tenure in American politics as the issue itself has evolved and been redefined over time.

I ask the question: how has climate change been historically framed and why have certain sets of frames dominated the discourse at points in time? The literature on political communication and emphasis framing submits that how issues are framed have strong downstream effects on how individuals perceive and understand those issues. With this in mind, this paper examine how storylines (or sets of individual but related frames) have historically developed in American climate change politics and what their composition suggests about the dominant understanding of climate change at those times. In terms of how political discourse changes over time, focusing events may provide leverage into understanding the process of storyline transition as such events have the potential to redirect political attention and open up new framing opportunities. But what sorts of focusing events have historically mattered in climate change politics and how may these inflection points be found in records of political rhetoric?

In this paper, I provide a comprehensive, data-driven examination of how climate change has been portrayed in American public discourse, what contextual elements have influenced these portrayals, and how events and actors have been able, at intervals, to transform how climate change is understood in American politics. Data are collected from 25 years of New York Times articles, coded for framing content, and then analyzed using evolutionary factor analysis. This technique is adapted from Baumgartner et al.’s work on how the death penalty has been historically framed in American politics. These methods allow me to identify key storylines of how climate change has been represented. From there, I use trace the origins of these storylines to determine how (and why) they evolve over time. Preliminary results show six major storylines over the period 1988-2012, with strong suggestions that electoral results drive rhetoric on climate change and the need for climate action.

2019 - AEJMC Pages: unavailable || Words: unavailable || 
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4. Daniels, George. "Making Race Relevant in Southern Political Reporting: A Critical Race Analysis of 2018-2019 Storylines" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the AEJMC, Sheraton Centre Toronto, Toronto, Canada, Aug 07, 2019 Online <APPLICATION/PDF>. 2019-10-17 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1556291_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Using a purposive sample of 17 news media messages, this study employs critical race theory as a framework in a textual analysis of news reporting on political stories across the South. The 2018 gubernatorial elections in Georgia and Florida featured African American candidates while a Mississippi special U.S. Senate election featured an African American candidate. While none was successful, the news media played a central role in making race relevant. Then in 2019, the same news media made relevant in stories involving politicians in Blackface and attire of racial exclusionary groups.

2007 - NCA 93rd Annual Convention Pages: 24 pages || Words: 6397 words || 
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5. Morrison, Eleanor. "Introducing Zarf: Initial Audience Reactions to All My Children’s Transgender Storyline" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the NCA 93rd Annual Convention, TBA, Chicago, IL, Nov 15, 2007 Online <PDF>. 2019-10-17 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p193033_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Abstract: In late November 2006, media coverage announced the impending arrival of Zarf, the first transitioning transgender character on broadcast television. During the week following the trumpeted appearance, over 800 viewers completed a related online research survey. A tendency toward relative openness to a transgender storyline contrasted with a dislike of the specific character. Higher religiosity, Republican affiliation, and increasing age were all significantly associated with less favorable evaluations of both the character and storyline concept.

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