Guest  

 
Search: 
Search By: SubjectAbstractAuthorTitleFull-Text

 

Showing 1 through 5 of 1,218 records.
Pages: Previous - 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 ... 244 - Next  Jump:
2017 - American Society of Criminology Words: 143 words || 
Info
1. Wells, Jessica., Boisvert, Danielle., Lewis, Richard. and Armstrong, Todd. "Stress Sensitization and Biological Stress Responsivity: A Developmental Approach to the Impact of Stress across Gender" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Society of Criminology, Philadelphia Marriott Downtown, Philadelphia, PA, <Not Available>. 2019-08-17 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1276950_index.html>
Publication Type: Individual Paper
Abstract: The stress sensitization model proposes that distal and proximal environmental stressors interact to explain psychological and behavioral phenotypes. As suggested by this framework, the impact of proximal stressors, such as recent life stress, are more deleterious among those that have experienced distal life stressors, such as childhood abuse, due to the increased stress responsivity of those with distal stress exposure. The current research examines whether the proposed increase in stress response is explained by objective variation in stress response. Specifically, this research examines whether the interaction between distal and proximal stress to explain antisocial outcomes is mediated by biological measures of stress responsivity during a social stress test in a sample of undergraduate students. Further, previous literature suggests that the salience of proximal life stressors is greater among females than among males. As such, the current research examines this mediation process across gender.

2016 - American Society of Criminology – 72nd Annual Meeting Words: 146 words || 
Info
2. Tucker, Jane. and Miller, Lisa. "Police Officers’ Views of Stress, Stress Intervention Services and Pre-Service Education on Stress" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Society of Criminology – 72nd Annual Meeting, Hilton New Orleans Riverside, New Orleans, LA, Nov 16, 2016 <Not Available>. 2019-08-17 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1147924_index.html>
Publication Type: Individual Paper
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Drawing on a mixed method study on police officer stress, police officers’ views of stress, stress intervention services and pre-service education (police academy) are examined. For the qualitative examination, 46 officers were interviewed regarding police stress and stress interventions. Additionally, 673 officers through Pennsylvania were surveyed. The findings from both studies indicated (as expected) younger officers with fewer years of service have received more pre-service education with regard to police officer stress and are more willing to use stress intervention services when compared to older officers. However, other factors, such as perceived organizational support of police officers and perceived organizational support of the use of stress intervention services were stronger predictors of officer stress and willingness to use services than age or years of service. Other factors, such as size and location of the agency (e.g., urban, suburban, rural) were examined.

2011 - ASC Annual Meeting Words: 129 words || 
Info
3. Leone, Matthew. and Keel, Renee. "Occupational Stress and Crime Scene Investigation: Assessing the Causes of and Reactions to Critical Incident Stress" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the ASC Annual Meeting, Washington Hilton, Washington, DC, Nov 15, 2011 <Not Available>. 2019-08-17 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p516517_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Peer support and employee assistance programs are vital to the management of job-related stress. In law enforcement agencies, this support has historically been focused on sworn police officers, primarily in response to tragic, traumatic, or stress inducing incidents experienced in the line of duty. While assistance may be available to all employees, some employees may be both less aware of this support, and in greater need due to the nature of their exposure and the lack of informal peer support. A survey of sworn and non-sworn crime scene investigators was utilized to assess: 1) the nature and type of stress experienced by these criminalists; 2) the resources available to diminish the impact of these stressful events; and 3) the structural factors related to the provision of these necessary resources.

2012 - International Communication Association Pages: unavailable || Words: 8408 words || 
Info
4. Boren, Justin. and Veksler, Alice. "An Exploratory Study of Communicatively Restricted Organizational Stress (CROS) II: Associations With Organizational Stress and Elevated Cholesterol" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the International Communication Association, Sheraton Phoenix Downtown, Phoenix, AZ, May 24, 2012 Online <PDF>. 2019-08-17 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p556176_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: This study expands on prior research on Communicatively-Restricted Organizational Stress (CROS), which includes those stressors that individuals do not have a socially-supportive outlet inside or outside of their organizations. First, by using a sample of 405 organizational members, we explore the prevalence of the CROS by identifying the existence of the nature of this concept. After that, we explore the way that the CROS acts on an individual both physiologically and pscyhologcally by evaluating its associations with organizational-level variables (stress, support, and commitment) along with markers of stress (LDL and Total Cholesterol). Results were generally inconclusive. Discussion focused on significant findings and the need for better operationalization of this stressor. Implications and future directions explored the potential utility of this line of research.

2015 - SRCD Biennial Meeting Words: 481 words || 
Info
5. Kertes, Darlene., Liu, Jingwen., Hall, Nathan., Hadad, Natalie. and Wynne, Clive. "Effect of Pet Dogs on Children’s Perceived Stress and Cortisol Stress Responses" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the SRCD Biennial Meeting, Pennsylvania Convention Center and the Philadelphia Marriott Downtown Hotel, Philadelphia, PA, <Not Available>. 2019-08-17 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p960924_index.html>
Publication Type: Presentation
Abstract: Interaction with pet or therapy dogs are commonly believed among the general public (Kruger & Serpell, 2006) and medical community (Hoffmann et al., 2009) to have positive emotional and health benefits for children, especially stress reduction and enhanced social support. However, these claims have not been empirically tested in a controlled laboratory environment. The present study tested whether pet dogs have stress-buffering effects for children during a validated laboratory-based protocol, the Trier Social Stress Test for Children (TSST-C). Both perceived stress and cortisol response to stress were examined to capture orthogonal components of emotional stress/coping and neuroendocrine stress response. Because prior research demonstrates that social buffering of stress responses is impacted by temperamental vulnerability to social inhibition (Kertes et al., 2009), we examined the potential stress-buffering effect of social support as main effects and in interaction with child social inhibition.

Participants were 101 children age 7-12 years (M=10.2 years; 50% male; 84.2% White) with their primary caregivers and pet dogs. During the TSST-C, a 15-min stressor, including a speech prep, speech delivery, and mental arithmetic in front of two adult judges, is flanked by a baseline and recovery phase. Children were randomly assigned to a pet present condition or one of two comparison conditions: parent present, or no support figure present. Children’s perceived stress was assessed via the Self-Assessment Manikin (Bradley & Lang, 1994) for the baseline phase, end of stress phase, and recovery phase. Five saliva samples captured the cortisol response to stress using area under the curve (AUC; Pruessner et al., 1994). Parents completed the Behavioral Inhibition Scale (Bishop, Spence, & Mcdonald, 2003) to assess child social inhibition.

Results indicated that in the alone (no social support) condition, children showed the expected rise for both perceived stress and cortisol response to stress (M rise perceived stress=3.33, SD=.49; M cortisol rise= .05 µg/dl. SD=.02). ANOVA indicated rise in perceived stress differed by condition (F=5.53, p<.01). Post-hoc tests with Tukey HSD indicated that that pet dog presence buffered perceived stress compared to alone and parent present condition; no difference was observed between parent and alone conditions (fig 1), and no effects of child social inhibition were observed. Regression analyses with cortisol AUC yielded a different pattern. Higher levels of social inhibition predicted higher total cortisol output in the alone condition (β=.46, p<.05), and to lesser extent dog present condition (β=.32, p=.07), but not the parent present condition (β=-.007, ns), suggesting parent presence buffered cortisol response to stress for socially inhibited children (fig 2).

This study tested whether pet dogs reduce stress among children using a validated experimental protocol. The findings lend support to the notion that pet presence reduces children’s perceived stress, even with a brief 15-min stress exposure. However, this stress-buffering effect did not extend to children’s cortisol response to stress. The results suggest buffering of stress responses have different underlying mechanisms for social support provided by parents and pets.

Pages: Previous - 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 ... 244 - Next  Jump:

©2019 All Academic, Inc.   |   All Academic Privacy Policy