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2013 - Ninth Annual Congress of Qualitative Inquiry Words: 29 words || 
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1. Beck, Cheryl. "Sub disciplines of the sub discipline?" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the Ninth Annual Congress of Qualitative Inquiry, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, Illinois, <Not Available>. 2019-12-11 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p645228_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Abstract: The focus here is on areas 'inside' of health focusing on whether they
might be considered sub disciplines of the sub discipline using nursing
as an example to explore this question.

2016 - American Society of Criminology – 72nd Annual Meeting Words: 161 words || 
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2. Chabot, Claire. "Homicide in Sub-Saharan Africa. What is the Influence of Formal Social Control on the Homicide Prevalence in Sub-Saharan Africa?" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Society of Criminology – 72nd Annual Meeting, Hilton New Orleans Riverside, New Orleans, LA, Nov 15, 2016 <Not Available>. 2019-12-11 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1162439_index.html>
Publication Type: Poster
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: The formal social control system (i.e. police, courts and prisons) is an important part of society, preventing crime and violence. However, very little is known on the impact of the quality of the formal social control mechanisms in the Third World. The present study tests the role of formal social control (corruption, police and judicial system efficiency) and social disorganization (inequality, poverty, war, alcohol consumption) on the homicide prevalence in 32 Sub-Saharan African countries. We used data from such agencies as UNODC and WHO as well as new data from the World Homicide Survey (University of Montreal). Results show that only the Gini coefficient (income inequalities) and alcohol use are significant predictors of the homicide prevalence variation. Thus, formal social control, whether efficient or not, has no impact on homicide in Sub-Saharan Africa. A further discussion point highlights the importance of informal social control (the role of traditional justice, religion, and family) to understand the prevalence of homicide in Sub-Saharan Africa.

2011 - Eighteenth International Conference of the Council for European Studies Words: 327 words || 
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3. Ozcelik, Ali. "Sub-national mobilization and territorial representations in Europe: The Euro-engagement of Turkish Sub-National Actors" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the Eighteenth International Conference of the Council for European Studies, Various University Venues, Barcelona, Spain, <Not Available>. 2019-12-11 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p484967_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Abstract: Since being granted an official candidate status at the Helsinki Summit of 1999, territorial governance in Turkey has seemed to shift towards a more regionalized model in which the horizontal and vertical dimensions of regional governance in Turkey has changed. Within this context, the behaviour and mobilization of sub-national actors in the political process has become a significant issue in Turkey. Many studies illustrates that the impact of Europeanization on the creation of multi-level governance, promoting the sub-national mobilization and territorial representation in new members and applicant states, are one of the biggest impetuses. Also, the activities of subnational level in the EU and sub-national relations with the supranational institutions have generally discussed under the multi-level governance approach. Scholars also argue that MLG is at work in many countries not because they appreciate to do so but it is because of the top-down effect of Europeanization. In the broader context of the role of regions in the European governance structure, this paper analyzes the euro-engagement of Turkish SNAs. As a main question, the paper investigates to what extent Europeanization has changed the behaviour of Turkish sub-national actors and mobilized regional interests within a broader political game across Europe.
Based on the semi-structured interviews with grass-roots in Turkey, the research employs the MLG approach and incorporates with the Europeanization literature to explore the mechanisms of change and resistance to change for the sub-national mobilization and territorial representations of Turkish SNAs in Europe. In order to achieve this, the paper divides into three sections. Firstly, the creation of multi-level governance in Turkey and its impact over the sub-national mobilization is discussed in relation to Europeanization and more specifically within the context of EU regional policy. The paper subsequently identifies five channels of representation which sub-national authorities (SNAs) are able to engage with European politics. Finally, the paper analyzes the extent to which Turkish SNAs use these aforementioned channels and explores the variation in euro-engagement among SNAs in Turkey.

2005 - American Political Science Association Pages: 42 pages || Words: 10548 words || 
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4. Nisbet, Erik. and Moehler, Devra. "Emerging Political Communication Systems in Sub-Saharan Africa: Some Preliminary Models" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Political Science Association, Marriott Wardman Park, Omni Shoreham, Washington Hilton, Washington, DC, Sep 01, 2005 <Not Available>. 2019-12-11 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p41634_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Scholarship in both comparative politics and communication has increasingly focused on exploring the national contexts in which political communication occurs, linking micro and macro levels of analysis (see for example Gunther and Mughan, 2000; Hallin and Mancini, 2004). This explication of how political, media, and socioeconomic systems jointly shape information sources and communication processes is key to understanding how such sources and processes in turn mobilize individuals and influence political attitudes. Unfortunately, most previous models of political communication have focused on advanced industrial democracies rather than developing democracies. The “third wave” of democratization expanded the scope of the research slightly to include Eastern Europe and Asia, but rarely to Africa or Latin America. Since the early 1990s, political and media systems within Sub-Saharan Africa have been in a state of ongoing evolution and transition. However, few attempts have been made to systematically and quantifiable explicate the characteristics of and relationships between these evolving systems in order to develop useful comparative models of political communication within a Sub-Saharan context.

This paper endeavors to outline an initial methodology and framework for developing models of political communication combined with types of mass media infrastructure within Sub-Saharan Africa. Previous efforts to build integrated models of political communication in other areas have exhibited two main weaknesses. The first is that models of media and politics developed in 1950s, 1960s, and 1970s were normatively driven and applied universally without due regard for regional, cultural, and national variances. A second weakness of previous theoretical modeling has been a general disconnect between abstract model characteristics and quantifiable or measurable indicators of relationships or dimensions within the model. This disconnection has inhibited the development and empirical testing of hypothetical relationships at the macro level of analysis or explicating macro-micro level linkages.

Recognizing these weaknesses, we base our examination of political communication systems within Sub-Saharan Africa on quantifiable measures of political regime and state characteristics, media systems, and socio-economic conditions. The goal of our model development is to create a set of useful heuristic tools for categorizing, describing, and theorizing about the evolving state of political communication within the region, rather than reifying specific models of Sub-Saharan African political communication. The models and data presented in this paper are useful for developing and testing hypotheses regarding macro-micro relationships and linkages in the areas of political behavior and opinion formation, or testing macro level relationships between political, media, state, and socio-economic arenas.

We start by briefly reviewing some key historical and contemporary trends in African media and communication systems relevant to our model development. Turning directly to our model development, we then examine the range and characteristics of political regimes that have emerged within the region since the wave of political liberalization that occurred in the early 1990s. We integrate our typology of political systems with a typology of media systems based on upon political, legal, and economic press freedom to formulate categories of political communication systems within the region that characterize both the political role of the mass media and influences on message creation and content. Next, we then turn to an examination of mass media infrastructure across the region in order explicate an understanding of the different means by which media messages are distributed and received within our models of political communication. Furthermore, we also examine the socio-economic correlates of both political communication systems and media infrastructure. Lastly, we develop some directions for further model development and research, as well as some initial hypotheses for testing macro-micro linkages with our models of political communication.

2005 - American Political Science Association Pages: 29 pages || Words: 13120 words || 
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5. Hendrix, Cullen. "Trends and Triggers: Climate Change and Civil Conflict in Sub-Saharan Africa" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Political Science Association, Marriott Wardman Park, Omni Shoreham, Washington Hilton, Washington, DC, Sep 01, 2005 <Not Available>. 2019-12-11 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p42162_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: The conventional discourse relating climate change to conflict focuses on long-term trends in temperature and precipitation that define ecosystems and their subsequent impact on access to renewable natural resources. Because these changes occur over long time periods, existing operationalizations of resource scarcity, such as measures of land degradation and desertification, are mostly stationary and perform poorly in capturing the proximate factors that may "trigger" conflict. We argue that this conventional discourse overlooks one of the key findings emanating from the global climate models on which these predictions are based: increased variance around mean temperatures and precipitation. We approach this question from two perspectives. First, we estimate the impact of both long-term trends in climate (operationalized as climate zones and land degradation) and short-term climatic variance (operationalized as change in annual rainfall) on civil conflict onset in Sub-Saharan Africa. We find that both operationalizations have a significant impact on conflict onset. More temperate, fertile climates are associated with a decreased likelihood of conflict. Moreover, negative changes in rainfall are associated with an increased likelihood of conflict in the following year. Second, we assess the outlook for the future based on our analysis of predicted changes in precipitation means and variance over the period 1980-2059. We find that total annual precipitation shows a positive linear trend, whereas no statistically significant trend is found in intra-annual or interannual variance, suggesting that monsoon patterns in Africa are unlikely to be affected by expected changes in climate. We conclude that strategies for avoiding conflict must focus on breaking the direct dependence of subsistence agriculturalists on rainfall as a source of crop water, even as the variability of access to this resource is not predicted to increase in the future.

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