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2004 - American Sociological Association Pages: 22 pages || Words: 7406 words || 
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1. Jones, Sarah. "Living Success, Achieving Success: How Success is Defined in One Highly 'Successful' School" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Sociological Association, Hilton San Francisco & Renaissance Parc 55 Hotel, San Francisco, CA,, Aug 14, 2004 Online <.PDF>. 2019-10-14 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p110498_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: In this paper I set out to complicate the notion of success. In order to do so, I draw from the data collected during a yearlong ethnographic study of the KIPP Academy (Knowledge is Power Program: KIPP) in Houston, TX. I argue that success is not simply a static entity that schools and students do or do not have, but rather, a dynamic social construct that becomes visible in different social locations. Through my research I have located to categories of success. One category consists of definitions of success that are external to the school (i.e., held by agencies external to the school such as the state government) that I term, "frontstage success." The second consists of definitions that are internal to the school that I term "backstage success." Whereas frontstage definitions of success are indicated through "objective" measures such as testing that hold schools accountable to the public, backstage definitions are represented by situated, local understandings used by students (and their teachers) to render conduct accountable, achieve a sense of agency, and create a culture of success. In the past, analytic priority has been given to frontstage definitions of success, while backstage definitions have been overlooked. However, I demonstrate in this paper that it is crucial to understand backstage definitions of success to help students become active participants in their education.

2011 - UCEA Annual Convention Pages: unavailable || Words: 8855 words || 
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2. Winton, Sue. and Pollock, Katina. "Success and Successful Leadership in Ontario, Canada: Provincial and Local Perspectives" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the UCEA Annual Convention, Westin Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA, Nov 16, 2011 Online <PDF>. 2019-10-14 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p523096_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Ontario, Canada’s Leadership Framework and interviews with staff and parents in three schools were analyzed to determine how success and successful school leadership are defined by the government and in schools. Findings from the comparative analysis show principals enact leadership practices advocated by the Ontario government to support success. However, the practices are enacted to achieve conceptions of success different from the one pursued by the government.

2014 - American Sociological Association Annual Meeting Words: 172 words || 
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3. van de Rijt, Arnout., Kang, Soong., Restivo, Michael. and Patil, Akshay. "Success Breeds Success: Evidence from Field Experiments" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Sociological Association Annual Meeting, Hilton San Francisco Union Square and Parc 55 Wyndham San Francisco, San Francisco, CA, Aug 15, 2014 <Not Available>. 2019-10-14 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p725751_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Successes tend to accrue to people who have been successful before. Two mechanisms can explain the relationship between past and present success. Pre-existing differentiation along fitness dimensions may repeatedly direct successes toward certain subpopulations. Alternatively, success may breed success through positive feedback. Observational studies have not been able to evidence the operation of a success-breeds-success mechanism because correlations between successes in longitudinal records may also be produced by unobserved fitness advantages. To overcome this problem of empirical confounding, we conducted randomized experiments by intervening in four live social systems across the domains of funding, status, social support, and reputation. In each system we consistently found that bestowed success upon arbitrarily selected recipients produced significant improvements in subsequent rates of success as compared to the control group of non-recipients. Experiments in which money was donated to random projects reveal that the average benefit of the treatment exceeded its cost, suggesting that under certain conditions investments may pay for themselves through the subsequent contributions they trigger, even when made in disregard of target quality.

2014 - American Sociological Association Annual Meeting Pages: unavailable || Words: 6998 words || 
Info
4. Carroll, Jamie. "Creativity and Success for All: Investigating the Relationship between Stratification, Workplace Environment and Success" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Sociological Association Annual Meeting, Hilton San Francisco Union Square and Parc 55 Wyndham San Francisco, San Francisco, CA, Aug 15, 2014 Online <PDF>. 2019-10-14 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p722610_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Creativity is a valued trait in today’s economy. Businesses strive to support creativity in the workplace so employees can design innovative products that boost the company’s ability to be competitive in the global market. But little is known about who has access to these creative workplaces and how creativity impacts personal and not just business success. This study investigates how racial background and educational attainment predict access to creative workplaces and if these creative workplaces are related to individual health, happiness and economic success.
Creative workplace measures are based on Teresa Amabile’s work on creativity and organizational support. Using data from the 2010 General Social Survey (GSS), this study designs a measure of individual perception of workplace environment. The analysis separates and combines creative workplaces and supported workplaces to understand the interactions between these workplace characteristics. Findings indicate that having a bachelor’s degree does increase the likelihood of working in a supported and creative environment, but race is not a significant factor. Creativity is related to individual success, but only when joined with organizational support.

2009 - American Sociological Association Annual Meeting Pages: 23 pages || Words: 6176 words || 
Info
5. Mattson, Greggor. "Settlement and bar socializing: success and succession among San Francisco’s homosexual enclaves" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Sociological Association Annual Meeting, Hilton San Francisco, San Francisco, CA, Aug 08, 2009 Online <PDF>. 2019-10-14 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p309600_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Although San Francisco’s Castro neighborhood is the best-known and most institutionally complete gay neighborhood in the world, few realize that its settlement began only in the early 1970s. Fewer still realize that, by at least one measure of enclave strength, it only achieved hegemony within San Francisco’s broader homosexual ecology between 1999 and 2004, displacing two competitor enclaves organized around different cultural meanings of homosexuality. The emergence of a hegemonic bar district anchoring a homosexual enclave raises questions about the relationship between enclave settlement and succession, gentrification, and the role of leisure in subcultural socialization.

This paper demonstrates how bar districts are indicators of the vitality of homosexual enclaves and gay neighborhoods and provides a cultural interpretation of the links among homosexuality, urban leisure and gentrification. I present data the success and succession among San Francisco’s homosexual enclaves gathered through participant observation between 1999 and 2004 as part of a NIH-funded team ethnography on bargoing. I argue that enclave success, like gentrification, results from the ability of newcomers to raise the value of leisure districts and housing stocks in accordance with mainstream cultural values, which translate into the economic realm. Quasi-ethnic urban settlements and the lifestyle of gentrifies requires us to think about the meanings that draw people together in the city, the values people assign to those places, and their ability to create stability in leisure districts and local housing markets by appealing to mainstream values.

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