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2004 - American Sociological Association Pages: 22 pages || Words: 7406 words || 
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1. Jones, Sarah. "Living Success, Achieving Success: How Success is Defined in One Highly 'Successful' School" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Sociological Association, Hilton San Francisco & Renaissance Parc 55 Hotel, San Francisco, CA,, Aug 14, 2004 Online <.PDF>. 2019-12-13 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p110498_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: In this paper I set out to complicate the notion of success. In order to do so, I draw from the data collected during a yearlong ethnographic study of the KIPP Academy (Knowledge is Power Program: KIPP) in Houston, TX. I argue that success is not simply a static entity that schools and students do or do not have, but rather, a dynamic social construct that becomes visible in different social locations. Through my research I have located to categories of success. One category consists of definitions of success that are external to the school (i.e., held by agencies external to the school such as the state government) that I term, "frontstage success." The second consists of definitions that are internal to the school that I term "backstage success." Whereas frontstage definitions of success are indicated through "objective" measures such as testing that hold schools accountable to the public, backstage definitions are represented by situated, local understandings used by students (and their teachers) to render conduct accountable, achieve a sense of agency, and create a culture of success. In the past, analytic priority has been given to frontstage definitions of success, while backstage definitions have been overlooked. However, I demonstrate in this paper that it is crucial to understand backstage definitions of success to help students become active participants in their education.

2016 - Association for Asian Studies - Annual Conference Words: 242 words || 
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2. Kim, Chung Ho. "Avoiding the Success Trap of Rural Modernization: Lessons from Success and Consequences of Korean Saemaul Undong in the 1970s" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the Association for Asian Studies - Annual Conference, Washington State Convention Center, Seattle, WA, <Not Available>. 2019-12-13 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1073424_index.html>
Publication Type: Panel Paper
Abstract: How could 10-year success lead to 50-year success? This paper explores how to avoid the success trap of rural modernization with a case study on state-driven campaigns of South Korea during the rapid urbanization. As one of the most prominent campaigns, Korean Saemaul Undong (New Village Movement or KSU) in the 1970s aimed to modernize rural economy and to change traditional and unscientific mentality of peasants, under the strong top-down leadership of President Park, Chung-hee. Although KSU had multi-faceted aspects in terms of policy scope (physical/socio-economic/environmental) and policy implementation (top-down/bottom-up), KSU have been basically regarded as a spiritual platform for national agendas to be implemented quickly and efficiently. Under the KSU’s organization and mobilization capabilities, other rural modernization campaigns such as Korean Reforestation and Korean Family Planning were successfully implemented at about 40,000 villages. In other words, KSU rapidly transformed Korean traditional houses and villages into modern or westernized houses and villages. Further, KSU not only made barren mountains quickly reforested, but it also contributed to abrupt reduction in the fertility rate. However, KSU also created long-term vulnerable consequences beyond short-term miraculous success. Today Korea is suffering from extremely high dependence on foreign energy and resources. In tandem with population aging, the low fertility rate is seriously lowering Korea’s economic vitality and productivity. Finally, the paper points out why the paradoxical relationship between success and consequences happened in Korea’s rural modernization. Korea’s historical experience may provide meaningful implications to today’s developing countries.

2018 - 89th Annual SPSA Conference Words: 156 words || 
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3. Holman, Mirya., Mahoney, Anna. and Hurler, Emma. "Collaboration for Success: Women’s Legislative Collaborative Work and Bill Success in State Legislatures" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the 89th Annual SPSA Conference, Hyatt Regency, New Orleans, LA, Jan 04, 2018 <Not Available>. 2019-12-13 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1327697_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Research has shown that women are more successful in producing legislation in Congress. Scholars have also shown that women collaborate overall – and with each other – at higher rates than do their male colleagues. And we know that collaboration can increase odds of success in legislative environments. In this study, we evaluate the relationship between female legislators’ collaboration and bill success across all U.S. state legislatures in 2015. We do so by analyzing the movement of legislation sponsored by female legislators through different stages of the legislative process. We find that legislation sponsored by multiple women and by bipartisan women has a greater probability of being voted on in the chamber and of being signed into law by the Governor. Our findings lend support to the importance of women’s collaboration in legislatures, speak to the effectiveness of female legislators, and signal the value in electing more women into legislatures around the United States.

2016 - American Society of Criminology – 72nd Annual Meeting Words: 184 words || 
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4. Patten, Meredith. and Cleghorn, Leah. "An Evaluation of the Success Mindset Program: Success Laventille Secondary School, Trinidad and Tobago" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Society of Criminology – 72nd Annual Meeting, Hilton New Orleans Riverside, New Orleans, LA, Nov 16, 2016 <Not Available>. 2019-12-13 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1133310_index.html>
Publication Type: Individual Paper
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: The Success Mindset Program, a program of the Pan American Development Foundation introduced in 2015, aims to improve students’ self-esteem as well as treat issues related to self-esteem such as the likelihood of being involved in a crime as a victim or perpetrator. The project seeks to address risk factors and put protective factors in place for the students. These include exposing the students of the Success Laventille Secondary School in Laventille, Trinidad and Tobago to self-esteem and enhancement programs, such as anti-bullying and conflict resolution, as well as increase their exposure and provide them with opportunities that may not currently be easily available to them. This research is an evaluation of the program and uses survey and focus group data to measure self-esteem, the likelihood of victimization, and the likelihood of being a perpetrator of crime, among others. The research also examines the impact of a traumatic event, such as the homicide of a peer, on the students and whether the students’ level of fear of crime and the likelihood of being a victim of a crime increased after such an event.

2017 - Comparative and International Education Society CIES Annual Meeting Words: 301 words || 
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5. Rhodes, Rebecca., Gaskin, Leon. and Ghafary, Alim. "Ingredients of Successful Partnering in Afghanistan: Laying the Foundations for Success in Scaling-up Improved Teaching and Learning" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the Comparative and International Education Society CIES Annual Meeting, Sheraton Atlanta Downtown, Atlanta, Georgia, <Not Available>. 2019-12-13 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1215161_index.html>
Publication Type: Panel Paper
Abstract: Reading is fundamental to development. It is impossible to succeed in school if you do not know how to read. In the United States, students who do not read by grade three are four times more likely to drop out of school than their reading peers. In Guatemala, the World Bank reports that early grade reading competency is critical for continued retention and success in future grades. Failing to learn to read lowers attendance, increases drop¬out rates, and results in unsuccessful or school careers or early dropout. UNESCO currently estimates that the opportunity cost of 250 million boys and girls failing to learn basic reading skills is equivalent to an annual loss of USD $129 billion, or 10 percent of global spending on primary education (UNESCO, 2014). The world cannot afford this loss.
In Afghanistan, the barriers to teaching every child to read are perhaps more daunting than anywhere else in the world. This presentation explores how, in the early design phases of the program, the science of early grade reading and the contextual factors unique to Afghanistan were analyzed by USAID and the ministry to provide the parameters according to which an evidence-based early grade reading program could be launched in the country. Key considerations, such as ministry imperatives expressed in the national development plans, questions about languages of instruction specifically for the teaching of reading, geographic focus, and instructional delivery modalities are addressed. The particular tools used to analyze the early grade reading institutional and instructional landscape in 2014 are discussed, and the key decisions made based on those data are discussed. Overall, this presentation sets the stage for the other presentations on the panel by providing insight into the status of early grade reading in the country at that time that the Afghan Children Read project was conceived.

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