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2013 - American Sociological Association Annual Meeting Pages: unavailable || Words: 306 words || 
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1. Singer, Amy. "Unrefined Sugar?: Marketing Indonesian Palm Sugar in the US" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Sociological Association Annual Meeting, Hilton New York and Sheraton New York, New York, NY, Aug 09, 2013 Online <APPLICATION/PDF>. 2020-01-24 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p648977_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: My current research investigates the global flow of commodities and capital through an examination of Indonesian palm sugar (alongside a few other Indonesian commodities, such as cacao and cashews). Crafted both by Indonesian farmers and global economic arrangements, Indonesian palm sugar represents the productive labor of some and the consumptive desires of others. In this paper, I will explore the aesthetics of this sugar’s marketing and consumption. The Indonesian palm sugar that is at the center of my research project is being marketed in a variety of ways to US consumers. What types of cultural capital are assumed, or required, by the consumption of Indonesian sugar? And, critically, how does this sugar’s production context and appearance—because it is a brown sugar, and an Asian sugar—affect the stories that are being told about it, to and for consumers?

This paper will also examine how a small gourmet food company with a very limited budget for advertising works to vie for the attention of sugar consumers in a crowded marketplace. In their influential American Journal of Sociology article on American gourmet magazines, Johnston and Baumann (2007) suggest that consumers are learning from gourmet magazines how to make choices about which foods contain the most social status. Using Kniazeva and Belk’s (2007) approach to “unpacking packages,” my paper will use both ethnographic data and textual analysis to ask whether or not a gourmet food company’s marketing materials engage with similar systems of endowing foods with social status.

2019 - NAISA Words: 251 words || 
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2. Sy, Waaseyaa’sin Christine. "“Muccucs sugar” and Watery Worlds: Anishinaabeg Womxn in the Sugar Bush and Trade Economies of Michilimackinac, 1803-1824" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the NAISA, University of Waikato, Hamilton, New Zealand, <Not Available>. 2020-01-24 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1487083_index.html>
Publication Type: Individual Paper
Abstract: For the past forty years, historians of Indigenous womxn’s labour in Turtle Island have written into the invisibilization and devaluation of Indigenous women’s labour to show how this labour has been central to land-based Indigenous life-ways through periods of harsh and variable colonial policies and capitalist shifts. While this research secures womxn’s significant presence in those early relations, the narrative portrays womxn and her labour within the heteronormative and patriarchal model of “wife of” male European fur-trader or “daughter of” male Anishinaabeg Chief. Drawing on underutilized ship manifests (1803-1809) that document the watery world of trade commerce that circulated around Michilimackinac, I focus on the material signification of “muccucs sugar” which is indicated on these manifests as a cargo item. “Muccucs”, or makakoon, are birch bark containers produced mostly by womxn and children in their care. Sugar, meant in this context as maple sugar, is a food, ceremonial, and trade item produced by womxn’s spring harvest of the sugar bush. Both materially signify the presence of Anishinaabeg womxn of this time period, in both their traditional land-based practices and the trade economy of Michilimackinac. Published reminiscences of an Odawa womxn of her time living in this place and being in the sugar bush with her grandmother strengthen the link between manifest, sugar bush, and trade economy and render detailed insight into the labour, care, and uses of muccucs in this historical moment. This paper moves towards fleshing out the way that “muccucs” operate, as Brenda Child states, as Anishinaabeg womxn’s documents.

2006 - Rural Sociological Society Words: 150 words || 
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3. Parker, Jason. "Sociocultural Integration and Conservation in the Sugar Creek Watershed: What is the Real Promise of Globalization?" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the Rural Sociological Society, Seelbach Hilton Hotel, Louisville, Kentucky, Aug 10, 2006 <Not Available>. 2020-01-24 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p125112_index.html>
Publication Type: Abstract
Abstract: Globalization promises to expand markets and provide opportunities at the peril of dislocating local populations from direct ecological feedback with their farm and community. Sociocultural integration occurs at multiple levels such as the household, county, state, and national level and a person’s integration into one or more levels depends on multiple factors that include social networks encompassing local and non-local people. This paper presents results of an exploratory analysis of embeddedness, or integration into increasingly more complex sociocultural levels, to ascertain its effect on conservation use and the impact on local quality of life. Using an ordinal ranking of traditionalism (Kraybill and Hostetler 2001) as a measurement of ethnicity and integration, survey data from four Sugar Creek subwatersheds are used to construct metrics for hypothesis testing using SPSS’s ANOVA component, and key informant interviews contextualize the data as ethnographic examples of the relationships found among the dependent and independent variables.

2011 - Southern Political Science Association Pages: 42 pages || Words: 10024 words || 
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4. Laiprakobsup, Thanapan. "Business Coordination, Unity of Farmers, and Revenue Transfer to Agricultural Sector: A Case Study of Thailand’s Sugar Sector" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the Southern Political Science Association, Hotel InterContinental, New Orleans, Louisiana, Jan 05, 2011 Online <PDF>. 2020-01-24 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p455862_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Under what conditions does the government transfer revenues to (or from) agriculture? This article aims to examine the factors which are likely to lead to the government’s revenue transfer to (or from) agricultural sector in developing countries. It argues that business coordination and the unity of rural farmers are likely to lead to the government’s revenue transfer to agricultural sector. It also argues that the presence of the tri-partite agency is likely to lead to the government’s revenue transfer to agricultural sector. Using a case study of the politics of agricultural assistance in Thailand’s sugar sector, this article shows that highly coordinated agricultural industry, highly united farmers, and the presence of the agency are associated with the high percentage rate of the government’s financial assistance to the sugar sector. This article shows that high coordinated organized interests are able to influence the government’s policy.

2007 - Association for the Study of African American Life and History Words: 159 words || 
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5. Rogers, Thomas. "The Power of Voice: Courage, Conflict and Race in the Lives of Two Brazilian Sugar Workers" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the Association for the Study of African American Life and History, Atlanta Hilton, Charlotte, NC, <Not Available>. 2020-01-24 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p208547_index.html>
Publication Type: Invited Paper
Abstract: Drawing on oral histories gathered from two sugar-worker union leaders in the cane fields of northeastern Brazil, this paper examines the meanings of race, the dynamics of labor conflict, and the social role of personal courage in the context of a politically explosive time and place. In the early 1960s, the sugar region of Pernambuco experienced massive political mobilization and a rapid unionization movement at the same time that Brazil as a whole grappled with broad sociopolitical change. A focal point for national political battles and a worrisome region internationally—John Kennedy had the area in mind when he established the Alliance for Progress—the Northeast of the 60s has much to teach about social and political transformation. This paper views such change from the perspective of two men engaged, literally, at the grassroots—cane cutters and union leaders. Their accounts of politics and the lived experience of race provide a new perspective on this time and place.

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