Guest  

 
Search: 
Search By: SubjectAbstractAuthorTitleFull-Text

 

Showing 1 through 5 of 158 records.
Pages: Previous - 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 ... 32 - Next  Jump:
2007 - American Association of Colleges for Teacher Education Pages: 5 pages || Words: 2189 words || 
Info
1. Glassett, Kelly. and Shelley, Gina. "Student Teaching Supervisors: Does Their Status and Background Affect The Quality of Supervision?" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Association of Colleges for Teacher Education, Hilton New York, New York, NY, Feb 22, 2007 Online <PDF>. 2019-06-18 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p141819_index.html>
Publication Type: Poster
Abstract: This research proposal will examine university supervisors of preservice teachers predicated on what source they are drawn from to explore preservice teachers experiences during student teaching.

2006 - American Sociological Association Pages: 43 pages || Words: 11064 words || 
Info
2. Yoon, Jeongkoo. "Mechanisms Constructing Legitimacy of Team Supervisors and Their Effects on Team Efficacy and Team Commitments" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Sociological Association, Montreal Convention Center, Montreal, Quebec, Canada, Aug 11, 2006 Online <PDF>. 2019-06-18 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p104128_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Abstract: This study proposes endorsement and authorization as two social construction mechanisms of team supervisors’ legitimacy among key team stakeholders. Endorsement is the support of supervisory legitimacy by team members, whereas authorization is the support of the legitimacy by management at the higher hierarchical level. Drawing upon these social construction mechanisms of legitimacy, this study hypothesizes that (1) beyond the personal belief on the legitimacy, a team member who observes that other team members endorse and the management authorizes the supervisor will perceive the supervisor’s authority more legitimate; (2) in team settings, the effect of endorsement on legitimacy will be greater than that of authorization; and (3) the constructed legitimacy will mediate the effects of endorsement and authorization on team effectiveness (e.g., team efficacy and team commitment). The hypotheses were tested in a sample of 320 respondents from 53 teams. The results provide an overall support of the hypotheses. As predicted in Hypothesis 1, endorsement and authorization were the significant mechanisms enhancing legitimacy beyond personal beliefs. In support of Hypothesis 2, the effect of endorsement on legitimacy was greater than that of authorization. Also supporting Hypothesis 3, the mediating effects of legitimacy on team efficacy and commitment were significant. The implications of these findings are discussed in more detail in the conclusion.

2008 - International Communication Association Pages: unavailable || Words: 10790 words || 
Info
3. Elving, Wim. and Hansma, Lindy. "Leading Organizational Change: On the Role of Top Management and Supervisors in Communicating Organizational Change" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the International Communication Association, TBA, Montreal, Quebec, Canada, May 21, 2008 Online <APPLICATION/PDF>. 2019-06-18 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p231015_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Abstract: In this paper we present two studies on the role of top management and direct supervisors on communicating organizational change. The importance of leadership at all levels is demonstrated and published in numerous studies, but empirically hardly tested. A distinction was made between information and communication and tested, besides trust in top management and role of direct supervisors, on their influence on support for the change and contribution to the change. We found that trust in top management had a significant influence on the support for the change, and that the role of direct supervisors had a significant influence on the contribution to the change. From the first study we concluded that especially the interactions between management and employees during organizational change is troublesome in the organizations that participated. To test these interactions more thoroughly we conducted a total of 37 interviews on line communication in two organizations. The main conclusion from our study is that the success of an organizational change largely depends on the informative and communicative skills of managers at all levels.

2009 - ATE Annual Meeting Pages: 49 pages || Words: 12119 words || 
Info
4. Glassett, Kelly. "Supervisors of Student Teacher’s: A Review of the Literature and an Examination of Theoretical Frameworks" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the ATE Annual Meeting, Hyatt Regency Dallas, Dallas, TX, Feb 15, 2009 Online <PDF>. 2019-06-18 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p277697_index.html>
Publication Type: Single Paper Format
Abstract: This paper reviews the theoretical framework(s), models, and literature in the area of supervision as they pertain to the supervision of student teachers in field placements by university supervisors. The review explores the dilemmas supervisors and researchers in the field of supervision and teacher education face when considering the university supervisor of student teachers, and ultimately brings into full view the notion that the field suffers from a lack of theoretical grounding/framing. Also, this review reveals that little if any research has considered the sources of university supervisors, and that a large portion of the literature suffers from a lack of specificity.

2009 - American Psychology - Law Society Words: 100 words || 
Info
5. Stinson, Veronica., Kelloway, Kevin., Duffy, Melissa., Bourgeois, Luc. and Moase, Celia. "Eyewitness memory for workplace accidents: Supervisors’ behavior compromises reports of occupational accidents" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Psychology - Law Society, TBA, San Antonio, TX, Mar 04, 2009 <Not Available>. 2019-06-18 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p295775_index.html>
Publication Type: Poster
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Investigators often rely on information provided by eyewitnesses to determine the cause(s) of the accident and identify ways of preventing future mishaps. However, the data on which accident investigators rely is error-prone. Participants (N=174) worked in small groups on an artistic task. During the session, schemas for the “supervisor” and a confederate were manipulated. After a minor workplace accident, we measured recall and recognition memory for the accident. The supervisor’s behavior influenced memory performance and productivity. With direct implications for the product of occupational accident investigations, these results suggest that accident investigators should exercise caution when relying on eyewitness reports.

Pages: Previous - 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 ... 32 - Next  Jump:

©2019 All Academic, Inc.   |   All Academic Privacy Policy