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2016 - BEA Pages: unavailable || Words: unavailable || 
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1. Abuljadail, Mohammad. "Open-ended Questions and Mixed-mode Survey? A comparison between Telephone Survey and Online Survey" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the BEA, Westgate Hotel & Casino, Las Vegas, NV, Apr 17, 2016 Online <APPLICATION/PDF>. 2019-10-14 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1112403_index.html>
Publication Type: Open Paper
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: The emergence of Internet has help surveyors create online survey methodology which had advantages and disadvantages. One of the online survey disadvantages is its difficulty in applying it on a random sample. Therefore, many researchers complement the disadvantages in any survey mode by using another mode. Although the use of mixed-mode became the new norm, previous studies have raised questions about the measurement of the questions and its reliability in measuring the same answers in two different modes. This study investigates one particular type of survey questions (open-ended) and compare the item-response rate between two groups of participants that responded to the survey through two different modes (telephone and online). The findings of the study show significant difference between the two groups in the item-response rate of open-ended questions. Online participants answer more open-ended questions than telephone participants. The study offers suggestions for future research and discusses the limitations in this study.

2015 - American Sociological Association Annual Meeting Pages: unavailable || Words: 5769 words || 
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2. Kolczynska, Marta. and Schoene, Matthew. "Challenges to Survey Data Harmonization: Quality of Survey Documentation in Cross-National Surveys" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Sociological Association Annual Meeting, Hilton Chicago and Palmer House Hilton, Chicago, Illinois, Aug 20, 2015 Online <APPLICATION/PDF>. 2019-10-14 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1010240_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Many social phenomena bare the imprint of regional and global social, economic, and political processes, and therefore should be studied in a comparative framework. However, inequalities in survey coverage across various regions and the lack of uniform data collection and documentation standards in cross-national survey projects pose a serious limitation to comparative research. While previous efforts to advance cross-national research usually produce a new dataset, we argue that the answer to these problems is actually better integration of existing data. This paper focuses on the assessment of the quality of data documentation, an important, although often neglected, element of any data analysis that is especially crucial for data harmonization projects. We assessed the quality of surveys based on information provided in survey documentation: questionnaire pre-testing, translation method, sampling, presence of fieldwork control, as well as unit and item non-response. Finally, we discuss incorporating documentation measures into substantive analyses, as well as the potential for standardization of survey documentation and the survey process itself.

2011 - The Law and Society Association Words: 100 words || 
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3. Murayama, Masayuki. "Differences in Responses between an Interview Survey and an Internet Survey" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the The Law and Society Association, Westin St. Francis Hotel, San Francisco, CA, May 30, 2011 <Not Available>. 2019-10-14 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p495704_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: We are facing increasing difficulties in obtaining responses in surveys and, in Japan, response rates have gone down from 60% to 40% for 10 to 15 years. The response rate is particularly low among young employees living in urban areas. As we have to find a way other than interview, an internet survey could be a choice, though some people still have strong reservation about the quality of response. Drawing upon results of out interview and internet surveys, the paper compares what differences exist between them and tries to see to what extent we can rely on an internet survey.

2005 - American Association For Public Opinion Association Words: 266 words || 
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4. hall, leslyn ., ZuWallack, Randall . and Ivie, Kirsten. "Is it Worth the Effort: RDD Telephone Surveys and Advance Survey Notification" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Association For Public Opinion Association, Fontainebleau Resort, Miami Beach, FL, <Not Available>. 2019-10-14 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p17121_index.html>
Publication Type: Paper/Poster Proposal
Abstract: This paper investigates seeks to investigate the potentially unintended consequences of mailing an advance letter to RDD telephone survey respondents. While it is generally accepted that advance notification for any survey has positive effects on response rates, what is less clear are the effects on survey estimates.

Using the Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System RDD Telephone Surveys for a number of states, and the US Department of Housing and Urban DevelopmentÂ’s Fair Market Rent (FMR) Regional RDD Telephone Surveys, ORC Macro conducted experiments whereby the company mailed advance letters to randomly selected households of the RDD telephone sample members where addresses could be ascertained, and then did not mail advance letters to the other listed and unlisted households. Initial analyses of the FMR survey data indicated that perhaps the increased costs and efforts to obtain these higher response rates did not significantly affect the statistic of interest -- the contract rental value for two bedroom apartments; what was less clear is if the increased response rate affected the bias of the estimate.

This paper seeks to thoroughly examine how the advance notification affects response and cooperation rates for these two different RDD telephone surveys by evaluating whether or not the apparent receipt of advance notification introduce any significant bias to the variables of interest; does it introduce a new source of error into estimates by increasing the potential representation of the list portion of the RDD telephone-sampling frame. To the extent that differences between the two survey experiments are found, this paper then goes on to consider how the surveysÂ’ advertised content effects participation and results.

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