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2016 - BEA Pages: unavailable || Words: unavailable || 
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1. Abuljadail, Mohammad. "Open-ended Questions and Mixed-mode Survey? A comparison between Telephone Survey and Online Survey" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the BEA, Westgate Hotel & Casino, Las Vegas, NV, Apr 17, 2016 Online <APPLICATION/PDF>. 2020-02-25 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1112403_index.html>
Publication Type: Open Paper
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: The emergence of Internet has help surveyors create online survey methodology which had advantages and disadvantages. One of the online survey disadvantages is its difficulty in applying it on a random sample. Therefore, many researchers complement the disadvantages in any survey mode by using another mode. Although the use of mixed-mode became the new norm, previous studies have raised questions about the measurement of the questions and its reliability in measuring the same answers in two different modes. This study investigates one particular type of survey questions (open-ended) and compare the item-response rate between two groups of participants that responded to the survey through two different modes (telephone and online). The findings of the study show significant difference between the two groups in the item-response rate of open-ended questions. Online participants answer more open-ended questions than telephone participants. The study offers suggestions for future research and discusses the limitations in this study.

2015 - American Sociological Association Annual Meeting Pages: unavailable || Words: 5769 words || 
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2. Kolczynska, Marta. and Schoene, Matthew. "Challenges to Survey Data Harmonization: Quality of Survey Documentation in Cross-National Surveys" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Sociological Association Annual Meeting, Hilton Chicago and Palmer House Hilton, Chicago, Illinois, Aug 20, 2015 Online <APPLICATION/PDF>. 2020-02-25 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1010240_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Many social phenomena bare the imprint of regional and global social, economic, and political processes, and therefore should be studied in a comparative framework. However, inequalities in survey coverage across various regions and the lack of uniform data collection and documentation standards in cross-national survey projects pose a serious limitation to comparative research. While previous efforts to advance cross-national research usually produce a new dataset, we argue that the answer to these problems is actually better integration of existing data. This paper focuses on the assessment of the quality of data documentation, an important, although often neglected, element of any data analysis that is especially crucial for data harmonization projects. We assessed the quality of surveys based on information provided in survey documentation: questionnaire pre-testing, translation method, sampling, presence of fieldwork control, as well as unit and item non-response. Finally, we discuss incorporating documentation measures into substantive analyses, as well as the potential for standardization of survey documentation and the survey process itself.

2005 - American Association For Public Opinion Association Words: 221 words || 
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3. Luyegu, Annette. "Transforming a Paper Survey into a Web-based Survey: Respondent Experiences" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Association For Public Opinion Association, Fontainebleau Resort, Miami Beach, FL, <Not Available>. 2020-02-25 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p17125_index.html>
Publication Type: Paper/Poster Proposal
Abstract: As researchers devise more efficient and economic ways of collecting data, and as Web-based surveys become more refined and popular, survey methodologists need to advance the current data collection techniques to insure validity and reliability of data collected through the Internet. In order to make self-administered Web-based surveys more user-friendly, it is critical to recognize and understand the respondents’ experiences as they complete the survey. For the computer-savvy respondent, a Web-based survey can be a pleasant experience; however, an individual with little or no knowledge in computer use could find the Web-based survey particularly frustrating.

In 2002, the data collection exercise for the federally funded 21st Century Community Learning Centers Program annual performance report transformed an existing paper survey to a Web-based interface, and more than 5,000 after-school center directors were required to submit their data online. By not relying on “volunteer-only” respondents, this survey was unique from most data collection practices.

This paper discusses experiences reported by the respondents as well as observations made by the author on the patterns of response, for example, the proportion of errors by question type, and the overall response rates of the paper survey and the Web-based survey. It will be interesting to see if survey methodologists are addressing the real challenges faced by respondents as they complete Web-based surveys.

2005 - American Association For Public Opinion Association Words: 281 words || 
Info
4. Crawford, Scott D.., McCabe, Sean Esteban. and Kurotsuchi Inkelas, Karen. "Using the Web to Survey College Students: Institutional Characteristics That Influence Survey Quality" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Association For Public Opinion Association, Fontainebleau Resort, Miami Beach, FL, <Not Available>. 2020-02-25 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p17005_index.html>
Publication Type: Paper/Poster Proposal
Abstract: The Web has gained acceptance as a tool for survey researchers. It has also been found to have introduced a whole new gamut of potential cost and error trade-offs, and re-introduced long known trade-offs. As Web survey quality is explored and the Web is used to study new ideas and populations, there is at least one population where the Web survey has been found to be a very effective tool: college students. However, there remains significant work to fully understand how to most effectively use the Web when conducting survey research among college students.

In our experiences with several multi-campus student surveys, the same implementation process and questionnaire has resulted in significantly different rates of response and survey completion from one campus to another. During the spring of 2004, the National Study of Living-Learning Programs (NSLLP) was conducted among undergraduate students at thirty-four college campuses. Response rates (AAPOR RR2) for each campus varied from 17% to 52%. Simultaneously, school administrators at each campus were surveyed about their institutions adoption of Internet technologies, student use of computing facilities, the general culture of email use at their campus, as well as other activities outside of the control of the research team that individual schools may have done to promote the NSLLP.

In this presentation, we will describe what we found to be key characteristics about a college environment that results in high response rates to a Web survey. We will also describe what other institutional efforts were found to be effective at increasing response rates. We will discuss how our results may be used to tailor a Web survey data collection to fit specific campus characteristics.

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