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2018 - ACJS 55th Annual Meeting Words: 93 words || 
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1. Chintakrindi, Sriram., Capellan, Joel., Porter, Jeremy. and Gupta, Suditi. "Examining the Effects of Psychiatric Symptoms, Brain Injury Symptoms, and Low Self-Control on the Placement of Inmates in Administrative Segregation and Their Risk for Suicidal Ideation" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the ACJS 55th Annual Meeting, Hilton New Orleans Riverside, New Orleans, LA, Feb 13, 2018 <Not Available>. 2020-02-22 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1304134_index.html>
Publication Type: Paper Presentation
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: This study seeks to understand the psychological and behavioral risk-profiles of inmates being placed in administrative segregation and those with suicidal ideations. More specifically, we are attempting to understand the magnitude of the effect that psychiatric symptoms, brain injury symptoms, and low self-control characteristics has on the risk of inmates being placed in administrative segregation and their risk for suicidal ideations. Our results suggest that brain injury symptoms significantly increase the risk of inmates expressing suicidal ideations when compared to alternative predictor and control variables in our multivariate models. Policy implications are discussed.

2015 - SRCD Biennial Meeting Pages: unavailable || Words: unavailable || 
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2. Harding, Kaitlin., Ahles, Joshua. and Mezulis, Amy. "Positive Affectivity and Impulsivity: Pathways from Externalizing Symptoms to Internalizing Symptoms" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the SRCD Biennial Meeting, Pennsylvania Convention Center and the Philadelphia Marriott Downtown Hotel, Philadelphia, PA, Mar 19, 2015 <Not Available>. 2020-02-22 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p955926_index.html>
Publication Type: Individual Poster
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Late childhood represents a period of vulnerability for externalizing and internalizing symptoms (Smith, Guller, & Zapolski, 2013), which may be partially explained by affective and regulatory vulnerabilities to childhood and adolescent onset disorders. Youth with high positive affectivity (PA) in combination with high impulsivity may be predisposed to respond to negative stimuli and seek positive and stimulating experiences without planful insight, resulting in externalizing symptoms (Derryberry & Rothbart, 1997; Whiteside & Lynam, 2001). There is also a high comorbidity between externalizing and internalizing symptoms during development, with research suggesting that for some youth internalizing symptoms develop subsequent to and as a partial response to consequences associated with externalizing behaviors (Lilienfeld, 2003; South & Miller, 2014). However, no research has examined the interaction of PA and impulsivity in the prediction of externalizing symptoms proximally and internalizing symptoms distally.
The current study examined whether youth high in both PA and impulsivity displayed greater externalizing symptoms, and whether these externalizing symptoms in turn predicted greater internalizing symptoms. Although greater PA is often associated with fewer internalizing symptoms (Clark & Watson, 1991), we anticipated that the approach tendencies and reward sensitivity inherent in both PA and impulsivity would interact to predict greater internalizing symptoms through greater externalizing symptoms. We examined global impulsivity and four dimensions comprising global impulsivity. We anticipated that greater lack of perseverance, greater lack of premeditation, and/or greater sensation seeking would be particularly likely to amplify the effect of greater PA on externalizing symptoms. We also anticipated that less negative urgency would amplify the effect of greater PA on externalizing symptoms due to its tendency to amplify negative affectivity (NA).
Participants were 122 youth, ages 11-14 (54.1% female, M=12.46 years), who were recruited from middle schools in the Pacific Northwest (see Table 1). At baseline, youth and their parent separately completed the Early Adolescent Temperament Questionnaire-Revised (EATQ-R; Carson & Bittner, 1994) to assess youth PA and NA and the Urgency-Premeditation-Perseverance-Sensation Seeking Impulsive Behavior Scale (UPPS; Whiteside & Lynam, 2001) to assess youth impulsivity. At follow-up three to eight months later, youth then completed the Youth Self-Report (YSR; Achenbach, 1991) and parents completed the Child Behavior Checklist (CBCL; Achenbach, 2001) to assess youth externalizing and internalizing symptoms.
We conducted moderated mediation analyses using the SPSS PROCESS macro, separately examining global impulsivity and the dimensions of lack of perseverance, lack of premeditation, sensation seeking, and negative urgency. Gender and NA were controlled for in all analyses. For youth-report, greater PA interacted with greater lack of premeditation and less negative urgency to predict greater internalizing symptoms through greater externalizing symptoms. For parent-report, greater PA interacted with greater sensation-seeking to predict greater internalizing symptoms through greater externalizing symptoms (see Figure 1). Global impulsivity and lack of perseverance did not significantly predict externalizing or internalizing symptoms independently or in interaction with PA. Results suggest that youth with greater PA and greater lack of premeditation, greater sensation seeking and/or less negative urgency may be more likely to display externalizing symptoms, which in turn increases their risk of developing internalizing symptoms.

2015 - SRCD Biennial Meeting Pages: unavailable || Words: unavailable || 
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3. Gueron-Sela, Noa., Breier Ziv-Av, Shiri., MEIRI, GAL., Marks, Kyla. and Atzaba-Poria, Naama. "Paternal Depressive Symptoms and Infants' Joint Attention Skills: Maternal Depressive Symptoms and Prematurity as Moderators" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the SRCD Biennial Meeting, Pennsylvania Convention Center and the Philadelphia Marriott Downtown Hotel, Philadelphia, PA, Mar 19, 2015 <Not Available>. 2020-02-22 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p959494_index.html>
Publication Type: Individual Poster
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Early research on the influence of parental depression on child development focused almost exclusively on mothers. However, more recent studies indicated that paternal depression may also have negative effects on various developmental domains over and above the effects of maternal depression (Ramchandani, et al., 2005). The few studies examining possible convergent effect of both parents' depression symptoms on children's development, have mostly considered maternal depression as the main variable affecting children's development, and paternal depression as a moderator (Gere et al., 2013). However, to the best of our knowledge, no study has explored whether the effect of paternal depression on child development varied with levels of maternal depression. Furthermore, previous studies usually focused on middle childhood and adolescence outcomes. The current study was designed to investigate the effects of paternal depressive symptoms on infants’ joint attention (JA) skills. Two possible moderators were proposed – maternal depressive symptoms, and infants’ biological risk (i.e., premature birth). The research hypotheses were:
1. Paternal depressive symptoms would negatively predict infants’ JA skills, over and above the effects of maternal depressive symptoms.
2. Maternal depressive symptoms would moderate the negative influence that fathers' depressive symptoms may have on infants’ JA skills.
3. Preterm infants would be more vulnerable to the negative effect of paternal depressive symptoms on their JA skills.

Participants were 117 infant (57 born preterm; 60 born at full-term) and their parents. Paternal and maternal depression symptoms were assessed at 6 months of age (CES-D; Radloff, 1977). At 12 months of age, infants’ initiation and response to JA skills (IJA; RJA) were assessed during a structured observation (ESCS; Mundy et al., 2003).

Hierarchical Regression analyses (Table 1) indicated that paternal depressive symptoms negatively predicted IJA skills, controlling for maternal depressive symptoms. However, only the interaction between paternal and maternal depressive symptoms predicted RJA skills. Post-hoc simple slopes analysis indicated that high levels of paternal depression predicted low RJA skills only when coupled with high levels of maternal depression (β = -.15, p < .001). In the presence of low maternal depression symptoms, high levels of paternal depression did not predict infants’ RJA skills (β =.11, p = ns). Finally, no prematurity moderation was found - paternal depression levels predicted JA skills of preterm and full-term infants in a similar manner.

Results highlight the significant role of paternal depressive symptoms in the development of infants' early communication skills. Specifically, fathers seem to have a unique role in the development of their infants' IJA skills. However, in the case of RJA only when both parents experienced high levels of depression symptoms infants were at risk for lower abilities, implying that the presence of a non-depressed parent may compensate for the negative effect of a depressed parent. In light of these findings, it may be advisable to screen for paternal postnatal depression, in addition to maternal depression. Furthermore, child clinicians should be aware of both mothers and fathers’ contribution to children’s early social development, and encourage both parents to participate in the therapeutic process.

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