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2016 - American Society of Criminology – 72nd Annual Meeting Words: 164 words || 
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1. Remrey, Lizabeth., Maimon, David., Cukier, Michel. and Sobestobso, Bertrand. "Who is on the System? Legitimate Users and their Influence on System Trespassers Repeat System trespassing Events against Computer System." Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Society of Criminology – 72nd Annual Meeting, Hilton New Orleans Riverside, New Orleans, LA, <Not Available>. 2020-02-25 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1147028_index.html>
Publication Type: Individual Paper
Abstract: System trespassing, or unlawfully gaining access to a computer system, is a growing concern worldwide. Viewing system trespassing through a criminological lens, this study analyzes the effect of the presence of other users on the system on the trespassing incident. Drawing on principles of Situational Crime Prevention (SCP), Routine Activities Theory (RAT), and restrictive deterrence, this research examines the potential restrictive deterrent effects of natural and place manager surveillance. Data were collected from a randomized control trial of target computers deployed on the network of a large U.S. university. Using ANOVA and pairwise means comparisons, this study examines whether the number and type (administrative or non-administrative) of users present on a system reduces the number of times a system trespasser returns to the system and the average duration of the system trespassing events. Results indicate that the type of user (administrative) produced a restrictive deterrent effect by significantly reducing the number of times a trespasser returned to the system.

2017 - Annual Scientific Meeting of the International Society of Political Psychology Words: 146 words || 
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2. Osborne, Danny., Jost, John., Becker, Julia., Badaan, Vivienne. and Sibley, Chris. "Examining the Ideological Roots of System-Challenging and System-Supporting Collective Action: A System Justification Theory Perspective" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the Annual Scientific Meeting of the International Society of Political Psychology, The Royal College of Surgeons Edinburgh, Edinburgh, Scotland, U.K., Jun 29, 2017 <Not Available>. 2020-02-25 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1244642_index.html>
Publication Type: Paper (prepared oral presentation)
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Research on collective action shows that identity, shared grievances, and group efficacy motivate social protest. Although insightful, this work often overlooks the inhibiting—and potentially facilitating—effects of ideology on collective action support. We address these oversights by taking a system justification theory perspective and arguing that collective action support is ultimately based in ideology. Accordingly, we use nationally representative data to show that system justification motivation has a negative indirect effect on system-challenging collective action via reductions in group identification, perceptions of injustice, and resultant group- and system-based anger for a low-status group (N = 2,328), but positive indirect effects via the same mechanisms for a high-status group (N = 13,819). Conversely, system justification motivation is positively associated with system-supporting collective action for both groups. These results provide the first integration of ideology into models of collective action to explain when ideology will—and will not—promote social change.

2009 - ISPP 32nd Annual Scientific Meeting Words: 256 words || 
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3. van der Toorn, Jojanneke., Berkics, Mihaly. and Jost, John. "System Change versus Stability: A Cross-System Comparison of System Justification Tendencies at Work" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the ISPP 32nd Annual Scientific Meeting, Trinity College, Dublin, Ireland, Jul 14, 2009 <Not Available>. 2020-02-25 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p314709_index.html>
Publication Type: Paper (prepared oral presentation)
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: According to system justification theory, people seek to maintain the legitimacy and stability of existing forms of social arrangements. We are interested in whether different types of social systems, each characterized by a unique historical backdrop and development, are justified to a different extent or in different ways. The present study investigated views held by American (n = 108) and Hungarian (n = 114) participants concerning what is fair in the workplace and what is not. Participants rated the fairness of, their satisfaction with, and the typicality of 4 hypothetical work situations, which differed in terms of distributive justice principles. Participants’ motivation to justify the system was also recorded.
Our findings indicate a general tendency to view the equity-based work situations more positively. Further, in both American and Hungarian contexts, the motivation to justify the system was associated with participants perceiving a range of workplace situations as fairer and feeling more satisfied with them. Based on the characteristics of one’s specific social system, however, these tendencies played out somewhat differently. Specifically, for Hungarians system justification was only associated with more positive views of work situations based on equality principles, whereas for Americans it was associated with more positive views of work situations based on equity principles. This research not only promotes a better understanding of the situational antecedents of people’s responses to justice-related events, but it also provides further evidence for the significance of system justification motivation for responses to equity and equality in people’s daily lives.

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