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2013 - ASC Annual Meeting Words: 164 words || 
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1. Drapela, Laurie. "Does the Presence of a Police Tactical Unit Increase Aggressive Tactics? Investigating the Association between SWAT Participation and Police Use of Force in a Midsized Metropolitan City" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the ASC Annual Meeting, Palmer House Hilton, Chicago, IL, Nov 14, 2013 <Not Available>. 2019-09-18 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p664079_index.html>
Publication Type: Individual Paper
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Despite their visibility in the media, Special Weapons and Tactical Teams (SWAT) have received comparatively little attention in the scholarly literature. Most of the SWAT research chronicles the widespread emergence of these units among American police forces during the last half of the twentieth century; as well as the integration of military–style tactics into policing activities. While some of these tactics are aggressive (e.g., serving high-risk warrants, drug raids), an empirical link between SWAT units and police use-of-force against citizens has not been consistently documented among jurisdictions with SWAT teams. In the following study, we use internal police records to compare use-of-force incidents between SWAT and non-SWAT officers in a mid-sized policing agency in the Pacific Northwest. Results show that SWAT officers have greater odds of using force against suspects than non-SWAT officers; however, once force is employed against suspects, its severity does not significantly differ between the two types of officers. Policy implications of the research are discussed.

2017 - American Sociological Association Annual Meeting Pages: unavailable || Words: unavailable || 
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2. Drapeau-Bisson, Marie-Lise. "Tactical Reproduction in the Pro-Choice Movement in Northern Ireland: Alliance for Choice’s Path Towards Successful Tactics" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Sociological Association Annual Meeting, Palais des Congrès de Montréal, Montreal, Canada, Aug 12, 2017 Online <APPLICATION/PDF>. 2019-09-18 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1253942_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Throughout the fall of 2014, Derry-based pro-choice activists in Northern Ireland held several meetings and organised a solidarity vigil as well as an action for the International Day for the Decriminalization of Abortion. The two tactics they used for these awareness-raising actions, namely the shoes and the wash line, were pre-existing tactics, used twice during the fall of 2014 in the same city and within a short period of time. In spite of a changing context and key events unfolding in the summer befor the fall of 2014, activists had surprisingly rapid decision-making processes during group meetings and often suspiciously all agreed of which tactics to use.

This case thus poses the question of continuity in social movements’ contentious practices. Why did they reproduce two specific tactics in the fall of 2014? While tactical reproduction is inherent to the concept of repertoire, what forces are at play in AfC’s decision to use previously developed tactics? Based on ethnographic data collected during the fall of 2014 with Alliance for Choice – Derry, by bringing together both material and cultural factors, I argue that path dependency (Pierson 2000) allows to explain the group’s decision to reproduce two specific people-oriented tactics. In doing so, I wish to show the ways in which cultural both constrains and enables activists tactical choices given limited material resources.

2008 - NCA 94th Annual Convention Pages: 38 pages || Words: 9607 words || 
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3. Raile, Amber. "An Analysis of Managerial Influence Tactics: What Dimensions May Underlie Tactic Use?" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the NCA 94th Annual Convention, TBA, San Diego, CA, Nov 20, 2008 Online <APPLICATION/PDF>. 2019-09-18 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p256026_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Abstract: Conversational Constraint Theory (CCT; Kellermann, 1988), which predicts that influence agents consider both tactic efficiency and social appropriateness, was applied to manager’s influence tactic choice. In Study 1, a similarity matrix, created using card-sorting data, was analyzed using multidimensional scaling (MDS); the results supported the hypothesized two-dimensional solution. In Study 2, the mean social appropriateness and efficiency ratings for each tactic were separately regressed onto the MDS dimensional coordinates. The results were mixed.

2017 - American Society of Criminology Words: 156 words || 
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4. Roesch-Knapp, Andrew. "Applying General Strain Theory to U.S. Counterterrorism: Tactics of Elimination or Tactics of Creation?" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Society of Criminology, Philadelphia Marriott Downtown, Philadelphia, PA, Nov 14, 2017 <Not Available>. 2019-09-18 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1278910_index.html>
Publication Type: Individual Paper
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Proponents of the lethal drone program argue that Unmanned Aerial Vehicle (UAV) strikes are the most surgically-precise, effective, and humane method of war ever known in history. Others raise questions about its effectiveness: do drone strikes eliminate, or do they create, terrorists? Do drone strikes act as an ‘effective recruitment tool’ just as President Obama lamented regarding GTMO?
This research project begins to answer these questions through a qualitative analysis of propaganda materials released by Al Qaeda, Al Qaeda of the Arabian Peninsula (AQAP), and the Islamic State of Iraq and the Levant (ISIL). The research project uses Robert Agnew’s General Strain Theory (GST) as a theoretical framework and conceptualizes targeted killings as a ‘collective strain’ that may increase the likelihood of terrorism. The project analyzes the evolution of propaganda messages and themes since the onset of lethal UAV strikes, and in doing so, illustrates the ways in which the two are in an interactive, polemical relationship.

2017 - American Society of Criminology Words: 156 words || 
Info
5. Roesch-Knapp, Andrew. "Lethal Drone Strikes: Tactics of Elimination or Tactics of Creation?" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Society of Criminology, Philadelphia Marriott Downtown, Philadelphia, PA, Nov 14, 2017 <Not Available>. 2019-09-18 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1278913_index.html>
Publication Type: Roundtable Paper
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Proponents of the lethal drone program argue that Unmanned Aerial Vehicle (UAV) strikes are the most surgically-precise, effective, and humane method of war ever known in history. Others raise questions about its effectiveness: do drone strikes eliminate, or do they create, terrorists? Do drone strikes act as an ‘effective recruitment tool’ just as President Obama lamented regarding GTMO?

This research project begins to answer these questions through a qualitative analysis of propaganda materials released by Al Qaeda, Al Qaeda of the Arabian Peninsula (AQAP), and the Islamic State of Iraq and the Levant (ISIL). The research project uses Robert Agnew’s General Strain Theory (GST) as a theoretical framework and conceptualizes targeted killings as a ‘collective strain’ that may increase the likelihood of terrorism. The project analyzes the evolution of propaganda messages and themes since the onset of lethal UAV strikes, and in doing so, illustrates the ways in which the two are in an interactive, polemical relationship.

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