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2011 - 4S Annual Meeting - Abstract and Session Submissions Words: 250 words || 
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1. Balka, Ellen. "The Technology of Art and Art of Technology: Exploring the Materiality of Technology through Art" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the 4S Annual Meeting - Abstract and Session Submissions, Crowne Plaza Cleveland City Center Hotel, Cleveland, OH, Nov 02, 2011 <Not Available>. 2019-01-16 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p519809_index.html>
Publication Type: Paper Abstract
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Recent scholarship in science, technology and society studies (STS) suggests that a greater focus on the materiality of technology can contribute to our understanding of the nature of technological change. Leonardi & Barley (2008) have suggested that the epistemological and ontological nature of the relationship between the material and the social remains unresolved. They have suggested that scholars have had difficulty grappling with the materiality of technology because “they often conflate the distinction between the material and social with the distinction between determinism and voluntarism” (p. 159). They suggest that one result of the equation of materialism with determinism is that STS scholars have generally paid little attention to technology’s material constraints and affordances, preferring instead to focus on the embededness of technologies in their social contexts, and the ways that social contexts influence technological change. Although social contexts into which technology are introduced are clearly important, focusing on social aspects of technology directs attention away from material features of technology people use. Drawing on insights gained from ethnographic observation and interviews, in this paper I explore the materiality of technology in relation to technologies used in the practices of art. Developing a better understanding of the characteristics and properties of technology can help us develop strategies and mechanisms for anticipating and responding to the complexities of contemporary technological systems. This work will help build a dialogue between artists and technologists, both of whom serve to benefit from greater interaction across what is often perceived as an art/ technology divide.

2010 - Theory vs. Policy? Connecting Scholars and Practitioners Pages: 11 pages || Words: 2781 words || 
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2. Lewis, Jeffrey. "American Technological Myopia: How the Fascination with ‘High’ Technology leads to the Dangerous Tendency to Underestimate Simple and Effective Technologies" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the Theory vs. Policy? Connecting Scholars and Practitioners, New Orleans Hilton Riverside Hotel, The Loews New Orleans Hotel, New Orleans, LA, Feb 17, 2010 Online <PDF>. 2019-01-16 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p416778_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Improvised explosive devices (IEDs) or roadside bombs have been a staple of guerilla and insurgent groups for more than a century since they provide weaker forces with the opportunity to strike when their adversaries are vulnerable. Given this, the lack of preparation of American forces for dealing with and responding to IEDs in Iraq is curious. One of the reasons is that American planners have a form of near-sightedness when it comes to technology, believing that American technology will invariably outperform the less sophisticated technologies of its adversaries and that context does not matter when it comes to technical performance. These assumptions have led to a tendency to under-estimate the effectiveness of technical systems that integrate elements of high and low technology in a context dependent manner.

2017 - Leading Learning for Change - AECT Words: 62 words || 
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3. Dogan, Selcuk., Agacli-Dogan, Nihan., Ates-Ozdemir, Emsal., Aybat, Burcu. and Ozdemir, Mehmet. "Promoting Technology Use Through #etusp: Importance Of Technological And Technological Pedagogical Knowledge" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the Leading Learning for Change - AECT, Hyatt Regency Jacksonville Riverfront, Jacksonville, Florida, Nov 07, 2017 <Not Available>. 2019-01-16 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1263831_index.html>
Publication Type: Concurrent Presentation
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Despite the importance of technology knowledge both in theory and practice, there is a paucity of research examining the effect of teachers’ different technology-related knowledge on their technology use in the classroom. The current study addresses this gap using data from a technology-based professional development (PD) program implemented in Turkey. Researchers, program evaluators, and PD designers can benefit from the results presented.

2004 - International Communication Association Pages: 29 pages || Words: 8693 words || 
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4. Riggs, Karen. "The Digital Divide’s Gray Fault Line: Aging Workers, Technology, and Policy The Digital Divide’s Gray Fault Line: Aging Workers, Technology, and Policy The Digital Divide's Gray Fault Line: Aging Workers, Technology, and Policy" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the International Communication Association, New Orleans Sheraton, New Orleans, LA, May 27, 2004 Online <.PDF>. 2019-01-16 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p112421_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Drawing on the author's ethnographic and textual analysis research over a five-year period in the United States, the paper observes that older generations of workers are getting used to the new models of technology-driven communication but may not feel "at home" in them. The author suggests steps for policy makers to stimulate and reward older workers, whose roles in the "new work" are both vital and threatened. Proceeding from data suggesting that work status often drives home computer and Internet competencies and usage in the lives of Americans over 50, the author acknowledges that the advancing age of Baby Boomers will cause some generational differences in competency and usage to disappear, but cultural differences among elders will persist. Effective public policy for curing the Digital Divide must include attention to older Americans on the margins, many of whom are single women, racial minorities, and residents of central-city or rural areas, the author claims. Recommendations include:
1. Tailor retirement systems for individual differences.
2. Make employment sectors elder friendly.
3. Make the educational system non-discriminatory.
4. Eliminate ageist practices inside the academy.
5. Strengthen policies to deter age discrimination by employers.
6. Encourage inclusive images of older workers.
7. Stop retrofitting facilities to "shoehorn" in disabled (often older) workers.
8. Encourage intergenerational learning communities.
9. Pursue age studies and intergenerational research.
The author concludes that citizens must assume a collective responsibility for re-creating social environments that will accommodate unprecedented complexities of intergenerational living in today's world.

2010 - 4S Annual Meeting - Abstract and Session Submissions Words: 450 words || 
Info
5. Gooldin, Sigal. "New Reproductive Technologies and Emerging Moral Vocabularies: An Agenda for Studying Technologies-In-Action" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the 4S Annual Meeting - Abstract and Session Submissions, Komaba I Campus, University of Tokyo, Tokyo, Japan, Aug 25, 2010 <Not Available>. 2019-01-16 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p422541_index.html>
Publication Type: Paper Abstract
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Since the birth of the first 'test tube baby' in 1978, the biomedical field of the 'New Reproductive Technologies' (NRT) developed rapidly and extensively, creating a range of unprecedented reproductive options that touches upon the very basic definition of kinship, culture/nature and life itself. One of the most known and controversial procedures in this area is In Vitro Fertilization (IVF), a procedure involving extracorporeal fertilization that become a routine treatment for infertility in high tech societies. The growing anthropological studies of NRT in general and IVF in particular demonstrate that these technologies become tightly interwoven in the complex matrix of moral imagination, and that they are often linked to a juncture of interests and power structures (e.g. scientific, national, economic, religious, gendered etc.). This seem particularly relevant in Israel, where the rates of IVF utilization are the highest in the world, and where IVF treatments are generously funded by the National Health Insurance system and enthusiastically embraced across many sub-groups. The point of departure for this paper is that while most critically applied studies NRT view them as mere reflections of already existing 'regimes of justifications', scant attention has been paid to the active role played by these technologies in creating, transforming and re-shaping the moral vocabularies of the concrete local networks. This paper aims at filling this gap by integrating two analytical frameworks: Latour's 'post-phenomenological' perspective and Boltanski and Thévenot's anthropology of morality. The paper is based on an extended case-study: a public dispute over the regulation of IVF in Israel, which took place in 2003 and 2004. In this dispute, an existing public health policy, which up until that time funded IVF almost unlimitedly, was threatened by proposed budget cuts. The proposed change of policy triggered a heated public debate, participated by a multitude of social actors (e.g. policy makers, politicians, economists, health experts, clinicians, IVF consumers, and media agents). The paper conceptualizes this dispute as a 'public drama' shaped by two complementing processes. The first one involved 'acting-out' and negotiation over existing moral repertoires regarding 'technologies of life' and 'reproducing bodies' in Israel. The second involved the emergence of novel moral vocabularies and moral communities, which challenged existing national and religious justification regimes. The findings of this study show that in the frame of these processes some of the taken-for grated oppositions (between Palestinians and Israelis, Arab and Jews, Non-Jews and Jews) were dimmed, spaces of shared vulnerability were formed, and new co-operations were mobilized. I argue that these are some of the unintended and unexpected consequences of NRT in Israel and that further attention should be paid to the ways in which NRT affect, and potentially modify the moral vocabularies of concrete local networks.

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