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2009 - International Communication Association Pages: 24 pages || Words: 6086 words || 
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1. Shin, Wonsun., Schriner, Maureen. and Cho, Soyoen. "Teen Online Privacy and POS (Parent Over Shoulder): Effects of Parental Mediation on Online Teen Disclose of Personal Information" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the International Communication Association, Marriott, Chicago, IL, May 20, 2009 Online <PDF>. 2019-12-07 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p301129_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: As teenagers become increasingly active on the Internet, protection of teens’ privacy online has grown in importance for parents, educators and policymakers. In this article, we research the relationship between parental mediation to protect their teenage children’s privacy online and the behavior by teenagers in online disclosure of personal information. Using secondary data from a survey of a representative sample of 935 teenagers and their parents, our analysis shows the degree parents mediate their teen children’s Internet usage predicted the extent to which the teens disclose their personal information on social networking sites. Parents of younger teens practiced more mediation to control teens’ Internet usage compared to parents of older teens. In analyzing predictors of the level of parental mediation, the significant predictors were demographic characteristics of teens and parents, specifically teens’ age, female gender and family income, while parental attitudes toward new communication technology was not significant. The study’s implications for parents, educators and policymakers are discussed, with suggestions for future research.

2011 - International Communication Association Words: 150 words || 
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2. Carter, Cynthia. and Messenger Davies, Maire. "What Do Teenagers Want From the BBC? An Exploration of Teen News Service Ideas Devised by Teens Around the UK" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the International Communication Association, TBA, Boston, MA, <Not Available>. 2019-12-07 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p488279_index.html>
Publication Type: Session Paper
Abstract: In the first phase of an AHRC funded project undertaken by academics and BBC partners, researchers spoke to over 200 children and young people (aged 8-15) around the UK to examine the changing relationship between the BBC and young audiences, with particular attention to Newsround, its flagship children’s television news bulletin and website. One of the key findings was that older children (aged 12-15) felt that as a public service broadcaster, the BBC ought to provide news for teenagers; Newsround, they suggested, is not sufficiently challenging, whilst adult news does not cater to their informational needs as young citizens. In a second phase of the project, we spoke to around 40 secondary school pupils (aged 12-13) in all four nations who worked in small groups developing programme pitches for a news service for teenagers that would be presented to the BBC, the results of which are presented in this paper.

2015 - SRCD Biennial Meeting Pages: unavailable || Words: unavailable || 
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3. Grossman, Jennifer., Tracy, Allison. and Richer, Amanda. "Parent-Teen Sexuality Communication, Parent Attitudes, and Teen Sex" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the SRCD Biennial Meeting, Pennsylvania Convention Center and the Philadelphia Marriott Downtown Hotel, Philadelphia, PA, Mar 19, 2015 <Not Available>. 2019-12-07 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p956760_index.html>
Publication Type: Individual Poster
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Risky sexual behavior has adverse consequences for adolescents, resulting in negative health (CDC, 2010) and academic outcomes (e.g., Fergusson & Woodward, 2000). Family communication about sexual issues is one potential preventive factor. Talking with teens about sex and parent approaches to sexuality communication (e.g., comfort in discussing sexual issues) are associated with teen sexual behavior, although the direction of these effects is unclear (DiIorio et al., 2003; Zimmer-Gembeck & Helfand, 2008). Examining interactions between how parents approach talking about sex and whether parents talk with teens about sex may help to clarify their associations with teens’ sexual behavior. Guilamo-Ramos and colleagues (2008) applied a conceptual model of behavior change to predict parents’ intentions to talk with their children about sex. Using their framework, we assess factors related to how parents approach sexuality communication: attitudes toward talking about sex (comfort, motivation) and disapproval of teen sex, both linked to teen sexual activity (e.g., Bersamin et al., 2008; Sieving et al., 2000), as well as teen/parent conversation about sex, to predict teens’ transition to sex. These relationships may vary across teen gender, which shapes the frequency and content of sexuality communication (Guilamo-Ramos et al., 2006; Martin & Luke, 2010).

We hypothesized that parents’ approaches to sexuality communication would predict teens’ transitions to sex through talking about sex for girls and boys. We anticipated that these relationships might differ by gender. To test these hypotheses, we conducted path models using data from the Add Health Study (Waves I and II) only including teens who reported never having had sex at Wave 1, controlling for teens’ age, racial/ethnic background, family composition, perceived parental support, parents’ education, and parents’ perception of teens’ relationships and sexual activity (e.g., if teen had dated, kissed, or had sex). Results partially confirmed hypotheses, with support for mediation among girls but not boys (see Tables 1 & 2), with disapproval predicting less talk and positive attitudes predicting more talk for girls. While mediating relationships of specific topics of conversation were not statistically significant independently, their combined effects mediated a lower likelihood of having sex for girls whose mothers indicated stronger disapproval and a higher likelihood of having sex for girls whose mothers have positive attitudes toward talking about sex. Mothers’ disapproval of teen sex predicted transition to sex both directly and indirectly.

Mediated relationships for girls suggest that parent approaches and talk about sex interact to shape teens’ sexual behavior. Both silent disapproval (direct effects) and disapproval expressed through talk about sex (indirect effects) contribute to girls’ sexual behavior. Positive associations between talk and sex for girls were unexpected and may reflect parents’ increased talk as they perceive greater likelihood of teen sex. Lack of significant findings for boys may relate to greater focus of sexuality communication between mothers and daughters on disapproval and delay (Regnerus, 2005). Findings can guide parents in how approaches to sexuality communication and talk about sex can influence girls’ sexual health and suggest how sex education programs can inform parents’ engagement in sexuality communication.

2004 - International Communication Association Pages: 26 pages || Words: 7955 words || 
Info
4. Stern, Susannah. "Messages from Teens on the Big Screen: Smoking, Drinking, and Drug Use in Teen-Centered Films" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the International Communication Association, New Orleans Sheraton, New Orleans, LA, May 27, 2004 Online <.PDF>. 2019-12-07 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p112461_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Smoking, drinking and drug use endure as popular yet dangerous behaviors among American teenagers. Films have been cited as potential influences on teens’ attitudes toward and initiation of substance use. Social cognitive theory suggests that teen viewers may be especially likely to learn from teen models who they perceive as similar, desirable and attractive. Yet, to date, no studies have systematically analyzed teen characters in films to assess the frequency, nature and experienced consequences of substance use depictions. A content analysis of top grossing films from 1999, 2000, and 2001 was conducted to fill in this gap. Overall, two-fifths of teen characters drank alcohol, one-sixth smoked cigarettes, and one-seventh used illicit drugs (N=146). Almost no differences existed between substance users and non-users with regard to physical attractiveness, socioeconomic status, virtuosity, or gender. Drinkers and drug-users were unlikely to suffer any consequences – let alone negative consequences – in either the short or long term. Characters were rarely shown refusing offers to drink or do drugs, or regretting their substance usage. Girls were more likely than boys to be shown engaging in multiple substance use activities (e.g., smoking and drinking). Overall, recent teen-centered films may teach teen viewers that substance use is relatively common, mostly risk-free, and appropriate for anyone.

2007 - International Communication Association Pages: 26 pages || Words: 6939 words || 
Info
5. Chu, Amy. "Teen Movies as Sex Education Material? A Content Analysis of Popular Teen Movies in Four Decades" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the International Communication Association, TBA, San Francisco, CA, May 23, 2007 Online <PDF>. 2019-12-07 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p173202_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Abstract: Parents’ concern about prevalent sexuality in the media has always been a focal issue as their children may learn from the media messages, particularly during the children’s adolescent stage, a period of exploring the concept of sex. Addressing to this issue with an emphasis of movies as an all-time popular sex education source, the current study content analyzes and compares sexually explicit content and messages presented in a sample of top-grossing teen movies of 1970s, 1980s, 1990s and 2000. The study also examines the thematic treatment of consequences and responsibility of sexual behaviors. The finding indicates that the amount of sexual behavior exceeded its talk-about-sex counterpart, and more than 60% of sexual behavior cases were overwhelmingly unmarried but 40% in fairly established relationship. Comparing types of sexual content, two-thirds of the samples in the 1970s and 1980s are sexual behavior, but talk-about-sex and sexual behavior share similar proportions among sexual content in the movies of the 1990s and 2000s. Moreover, sexual responsibility and consequence of sexual behavior are rarely mentioned in the sampled movies. Limitations of this study are also discussed.

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