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2007 - International Communication Association Pages: 26 pages || Words: 6939 words || 
Info
1. Chu, Amy. "Teen Movies as Sex Education Material? A Content Analysis of Popular Teen Movies in Four Decades" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the International Communication Association, TBA, San Francisco, CA, May 23, 2007 Online <PDF>. 2018-05-26 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p173202_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Abstract: Parents’ concern about prevalent sexuality in the media has always been a focal issue as their children may learn from the media messages, particularly during the children’s adolescent stage, a period of exploring the concept of sex. Addressing to this issue with an emphasis of movies as an all-time popular sex education source, the current study content analyzes and compares sexually explicit content and messages presented in a sample of top-grossing teen movies of 1970s, 1980s, 1990s and 2000. The study also examines the thematic treatment of consequences and responsibility of sexual behaviors. The finding indicates that the amount of sexual behavior exceeded its talk-about-sex counterpart, and more than 60% of sexual behavior cases were overwhelmingly unmarried but 40% in fairly established relationship. Comparing types of sexual content, two-thirds of the samples in the 1970s and 1980s are sexual behavior, but talk-about-sex and sexual behavior share similar proportions among sexual content in the movies of the 1990s and 2000s. Moreover, sexual responsibility and consequence of sexual behavior are rarely mentioned in the sampled movies. Limitations of this study are also discussed.

2015 - International Communication Association 65th Annual Conference Pages: unavailable || Words: 9223 words || 
Info
2. Martins, Nicole., Malacane, Mona., Lewis, Nicky. and Kraus, Ashley. "Gritty or Glamorous? A Content Analysis of Teen Parenthood in Teen Mom Reality Programming" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the International Communication Association 65th Annual Conference, Caribe Hilton, San Juan, Puerto Rico, May 21, 2015 Online <APPLICATION/PDF>. 2018-05-26 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p981032_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: A content analysis of the MTV shows 16 & Pregnant (n= 59), Teen Mom (n= 20) and Teen Mom 2 (n= 20) was conducted to determine whether these programs accurately portray teen pregnancy. The results revealed that teen mothers on 16 and Pregnant were younger, White, and had healthy babies as compared to national averages. The babies’ fathers were more involved in the daily care of their child as compared to reality. Medical insurance or receipt of government assistance was almost never discussed. Teen mothers in the Teen Mom shows were significantly more likely to receive a high school diploma as compared to reality. Finally, mothers on Teen Mom were significantly less likely to voice concern about finances and had more active social lives than mothers on 16 and Pregnant. Using social learning theory as a theoretical framework, we argue that these shows provide mixed messages to young audiences about teen pregnancy.

2009 - International Communication Association Pages: 24 pages || Words: 6086 words || 
Info
3. Shin, Wonsun., Schriner, Maureen. and Cho, Soyoen. "Teen Online Privacy and POS (Parent Over Shoulder): Effects of Parental Mediation on Online Teen Disclose of Personal Information" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the International Communication Association, Marriott, Chicago, IL, May 20, 2009 Online <PDF>. 2018-05-26 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p301129_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: As teenagers become increasingly active on the Internet, protection of teens’ privacy online has grown in importance for parents, educators and policymakers. In this article, we research the relationship between parental mediation to protect their teenage children’s privacy online and the behavior by teenagers in online disclosure of personal information. Using secondary data from a survey of a representative sample of 935 teenagers and their parents, our analysis shows the degree parents mediate their teen children’s Internet usage predicted the extent to which the teens disclose their personal information on social networking sites. Parents of younger teens practiced more mediation to control teens’ Internet usage compared to parents of older teens. In analyzing predictors of the level of parental mediation, the significant predictors were demographic characteristics of teens and parents, specifically teens’ age, female gender and family income, while parental attitudes toward new communication technology was not significant. The study’s implications for parents, educators and policymakers are discussed, with suggestions for future research.

2003 - American Association for Public Opinion Research Words: 247 words || 
Info
4. Olson, Kristen. "Do 'Knowledgeable' Respondents Really Know More? A Comparison of Parent and Teen Reports of Teen Spending" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Association for Public Opinion Research, Sheraton Music City, Nashville, TN, Aug 16, 2003 <Not Available>. 2018-05-26 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p116243_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Many studies use a proxy informant to gather data on the behavior of other members of the household, especially when collecting information on children. However, no studies have evaluated whether the “most knowledgeable” proxy provides more accurate reports than other potential respondents. Using data collected through a web survey using the Knowledge Networks panel, this paper compares teenager and parent reports of the teen’s expenditures in households with two or more adults. Parents and teens identified who they believed was the most knowledgeable adult in the family about the teen’s spending. We find that parents who identify as the “most knowledgeable” adult in the family are more likely to agree with their teenagers than other parents about the teen having made a purchase during the last seven days or yesterday. They also have smaller differences between the dollar amount they report being spent by the teenager yesterday and what the teen reports spending than other parents. These findings are reasonably robust against inclusion of missing data indicators or relationship (mother, father, daughter, son) variables. Teen identification of the “most knowledgeable” adult does not discriminate between parental accuracy as well as parent identification of the best proxy respondent. Reports from the most knowledgeable parent, while closer than reports from other parents, do not identically match teenage reports of their own expenditures. Practically, the findings imply that the designation of a “most knowledgeable” parent proxy is likely to result in better quality data about teenagers.

2011 - International Communication Association Words: 150 words || 
Info
5. Carter, Cynthia. and Messenger Davies, Maire. "What Do Teenagers Want From the BBC? An Exploration of Teen News Service Ideas Devised by Teens Around the UK" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the International Communication Association, TBA, Boston, MA, <Not Available>. 2018-05-26 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p488279_index.html>
Publication Type: Session Paper
Abstract: In the first phase of an AHRC funded project undertaken by academics and BBC partners, researchers spoke to over 200 children and young people (aged 8-15) around the UK to examine the changing relationship between the BBC and young audiences, with particular attention to Newsround, its flagship children’s television news bulletin and website. One of the key findings was that older children (aged 12-15) felt that as a public service broadcaster, the BBC ought to provide news for teenagers; Newsround, they suggested, is not sufficiently challenging, whilst adult news does not cater to their informational needs as young citizens. In a second phase of the project, we spoke to around 40 secondary school pupils (aged 12-13) in all four nations who worked in small groups developing programme pitches for a news service for teenagers that would be presented to the BBC, the results of which are presented in this paper.

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