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2018 - American Sociological Association Annual Meeting Pages: unavailable || Words: 7162 words || 
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1. Fedor, Theresa. "Teenage Girls with Older Male Partners, Age at Sexual Initiation, and Teenage Pregnancy in Colombia" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Sociological Association Annual Meeting, Pennsylvania Convention Center & Philadelphia Marriott, Philadelphia, PA, Aug 09, 2018 Online <APPLICATION/PDF>. 2019-09-22 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1374081_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: There has been a disturbing increase in teenage pregnancy in Colombia in recent decades which is associated with many characteristics of women’s lives. However, one known association from other contexts that has never been explored in Colombia is the potential for a higher risk of teenage pregnancy among teenage girls with older male sexual partners. One reason for this higher risk may be that teenage girls with older partners potentially have less bargaining power and control over decision making within relationships. Women’s potentially subjugated role within sexual relationships is also strongly influenced by broader social conventions which often define “normal” female behavior within relationships as passive and deferent when it comes to decision making. Strangely, results from this study show that dramatic narrowing in the average age difference between partners has occurred over the same time period as increased rates of teenage pregnancy were observed. However, older partners still put teenager girls (particularly those over 16) at higher risk of pregnancy, but the effect of reductions over time in age differences was not strong enough to counteract the increased risk of teenage pregnancy due to younger average age at sexual initiation (a reflection of broader social changes in sexual behavior). Among teenage girls who experience sexual initiation below age 16, there was a very high risk of pregnancy which was further increased with similar aged partners as compared to older partners. However, there is also a very large portion of very young teenage girls with significantly older male partners, a tendency that most likely leads to high rates of sexual coercion and other negative outcomes. This study highlights the importance of understanding the unique risk factors according to the age at which teens begin to have sexual relationships as well as the importance of female empowerment and more gender egalitarian social norms more generally.

2016 - American Society of Criminology – 72nd Annual Meeting Words: 195 words || 
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2. Blakey, Robert. "Who’s to Blame: The Teenage Brain or The Teenage Offender? A Field Experiment at a London Theatre" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Society of Criminology – 72nd Annual Meeting, Hilton New Orleans Riverside, New Orleans, LA, Nov 15, 2016 <Not Available>. 2019-09-22 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1149852_index.html>
Publication Type: Individual Paper
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: This study tested the effects of public engagement in neuroscience on attitudes towards young offenders. Brainstorm is a play about teenage brain development, showing at the National Theatre in London from 29th March to 2nd April 2016. Across six performances of the play, up to 1,350 participants will respond to four questions about youth crime either before or after watching the play. This experiment will test the effects of three independent variables: exposure to neuroscience, the age of the described offender and the number of prior offences committed by the offender.

It is hypothesised that Brainstorm will reduce punitiveness towards young offenders. Specifically, we expect Brainstorm to increase the recommended age of criminal responsibility, weaken attributions of moral responsibility to young (relative to adult) and repeat (relative to first-time) offenders, and reduce the expected probability that the described offender will reoffend – a measure of lay belief in the age-crime curve. Finally, the study will test whether Brainstorm changes attitudes only towards young offenders or also towards adult offenders. It is concluded that public engagement in the newest arrival to the criminological block – neuroscience – influences the perceived appropriateness of different youth justice responses.

2005 - American Sociological Association Pages: 21 pages || Words: 6639 words || 
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3. Mollborn, Stefanie. "Making the Best of a Bad Situation: Resources' Protective Effect on Teenage Parents' Educational Careers" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Sociological Association, Marriott Hotel, Loews Philadelphia Hotel, Philadelphia, PA, Aug 12, 2005 Online <APPLICATION/PDF>. 2019-09-22 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p20573_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Abstract: This study proposes a resource-based explanation for the negative relationship between teenage parenthood and educational attainment and tests the explanation using survey data from the 1988-2000 National Education Longitudinal Study (U.S. Department of Education, 2002). The availability of material resources such as housing and financial support is hypothesized to mediate the negative effect of teenage parenthood on education. Resources provide a potential explanation for the well-documented negative impact of becoming an adolescent parent on one’s future educational attainment. Results support the hypothesis: resources mediate the detrimental influence of parenthood on education, and resource-rich teenage parents do not have significantly lower educational attainment than non-parents. This finding has important implications for policy since providing teenage parents with resources may reduce or eradicate the educational penalty of parenthood, likely improving socioeconomic conditions for both parent and child.

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