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2009 - ISA's 50th ANNUAL CONVENTION "EXPLORING THE PAST, ANTICIPATING THE FUTURE" Pages: 47 pages || Words: 15710 words || 
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1. Zellman, Ariel. "Disputed Territoriality and Ethnohistorical Claims: Understanding Intractable Territorial Conflict in Israel, Serbia, and Armenia" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the ISA's 50th ANNUAL CONVENTION "EXPLORING THE PAST, ANTICIPATING THE FUTURE", New York Marriott Marquis, NEW YORK CITY, NY, USA, Feb 15, 2009 Online <APPLICATION/PDF>. 2019-09-23 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p312105_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: In an era of increasingly credible international commitments to the inviolability of existing borders and markedly decreasing material and strategic returns to territorial conquest, the objective costs of engaging in territorial revisionism are, in many respects, at an all-time high. While the initial wartime acquisition of territory can be explained by any number of factors, the real puzzle is why some states remain resistant to withdrawal. Often facing threats of international isolation or even military intervention and active resistance to rule by preexisting populations, instrumentally rationalist explanations cannot readily account for instances of “foreign” occupation in the contemporary international environment. Examining the cases of Israel, Serbia, and Armenia, this paper asserts that where a territory is seen as being imbued with culturally-informed historical meanings, conflict is significantly more likely to be intractable. Claims of this nature assign meaning to territory neither dependent on nor perfectly substituted by “more conventional” concerns of security, economic growth, strategic political positioning, or regime survival. The value-laden nature of these spaces further contributes to the sense that they are integral to the identity of the state and nation making the prospect of withdrawal increasingly unlikely.

2014 - SASE Annual Conference Words: 720 words || 
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2. Phelps, Nicholas. "Evolution in MNE Subsidiary Roles and Capabilities: The Extra-Territorial Dimension and Its Implications for Territorial Economic Development" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the SASE Annual Conference, Northwestern University and the University of Chicago, Chicago, IL USA, Jul 10, 2014 <Not Available>. 2019-09-23 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p728615_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Frameworks for understanding evolution in MNE subsidiary roles and capabilities found in the international business literature typically address a triumvirate of parent company, subsidiary and host territory forces shaping such evolution seen most clearly in the seminal contribution of Birkinshaw and Hood (1998). Yet, the evolution of MNE subsidiary capabilities and the impacts of FDI on home and host territories can hardly be understood without reference to the steadily increasing volume of regulatory activity that resides in the extra-territorial sphere of the international economy. Discussion of this extra-territorial dimension to the evolution of MNEs and their subsidiaries and indeed the MNE-state interactions necessarily pushes in the direction of an inter-disciplinary approach. In this paper we extend Birkinshaw and Hood’s framework to include discussion specifically of the contribution of state extra-territoriality to MNE subsidiary evolution. We do so by drawing upon the international business but also the comparative institutionalism, economic geography international political economy and international relations literature. Adding this fourth dimension to Birkinshaw and Hood’s framework provides a logical external environment counterpart to the two-level parent-subsidiary dynamic within in the MNE.
In particular we identify three distinct channels through which state strategies of extra-territoriality shape the evolution of subsidiary capabilities and roles. In the Birkinshaw and Hood (1998) framework, home country ownership advantages and their interaction with host environment characteristics are assumed to operate indirectly through the parent company assignment process – that is through the MNE as a (private sector) transnational formation in its own right. We can term this a type-1 manifestation of state extra-territoriality. However, a category of direct home state to host state relations and their impacts on subsidiary capabilities often subsumed within the type-1 manifestation of extra-territoriality of the parent-subsidiary relationship might usefully be distinguished. What we are referring to here is the often bilaterally-felt effects of state extra-territoriality - the projection of one state’s authority onto another or the sharing of authority among states felt through the rewards and sanctions associated with diplomatic relations but also manifest in geographical form through formal arrangements such as bilateral investment treaties (BITs), free trade agreements and zones of economic integration and the like. We label this channel for strategies of state extra-territoriality type-2, and it also clearly can have significant effects on the character of FDI. Second, there is a silence in the Birkinshaw and Hood (1998) framework as it stands on the subject of what we term type-3 state strategies of extra-territoriality which seek to influence the growing volume of advocacy, negotiations, regulation, law-making and arbitration surrounding trade, investment and intellectual property which takes place in a multi-centred (Djelic and Sahlin-Anderssen, 2006), non-territorial (Ruggie, 1993) or transnational (Morgan: 2001) sphere of the international economy which pervades or intersects with all environments receiving FDI.
We go on to illustrate the salience of state strategies of extra-territoriality to MNE subsidiary evolution by comparing and contrasting ethnocentric and geocentric strategies adopted by states with reference to the extant literature. Ethnocentric state strategies of extra-territoriality attempt to assert home environment-derived ownership advantages abroad. We examine the US as an example of ethnocentric state strategies of extra-territoriality and explore the implications of the strategy for the evolution of MNEs and their subsidiaries at home and abroad. We suggest that such a strategy also promoted a strong measure of inertia among MNEs and their subsidiaries at home and abroad. In contrast, geocentric state strategies are premised on the inevitability of the internationalisation of business activity and are pragmatic and outward looking in seeking to marry home locational advantages with the ownership advantages of overseas MNEs and/or the locational advantages of other nations and their subnational territorial economies. We draw upon the cases of Ireland and Singapore to provide examples of geocentric state strategies of extra-territoriality involving the mobilisation of MNE managerial and investment promotional diasporas and overseas industrial parks (O’Riain, 2005; Phelps, 2007).
Discussion of this extra-territorial dimension is important to understanding some of the impetus for significant change at MNE subsidiary operations within evolutional perspectives on the MNE and MNE-state relations which otherwise may remain rather static in orientation. An understanding of the contribution of state strategies of extra-territoriality to MNE subsidiary roles and capabilities also provides important policy insights into some of the difficulties host institutions have faced in effecting territorial economic development through the attraction and development of FDI.

2009 - ISA's 50th ANNUAL CONVENTION "EXPLORING THE PAST, ANTICIPATING THE FUTURE" Words: 37 words || 
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3. Norlen, Tova. "The Secrets behind Territoriality and Conflict: Explaining how Ethno-Territorial Attachments may be a Key to Conflict Intractability" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the ISA's 50th ANNUAL CONVENTION "EXPLORING THE PAST, ANTICIPATING THE FUTURE", New York Marriott Marquis, NEW YORK CITY, NY, USA, Feb 15, 2009 <Not Available>. 2019-09-23 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p313358_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Abstract: Territoriality and ethnicity are often separately blamed for causing conflict both between and within states. However, while neither territory (as an issue) nor ethnicity (as a characteristic) is sufficient to create conflict by itself, when ethnicity get

2010 - Theory vs. Policy? Connecting Scholars and Practitioners Words: 42 words || 
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4. Kaya, Zeynep. "Defining Territories: Kurdistan, the Aspirational Territory of Kurds" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the Theory vs. Policy? Connecting Scholars and Practitioners, New Orleans Hilton Riverside Hotel, The Loews New Orleans Hotel, New Orleans, LA, Feb 17, 2010 <Not Available>. 2019-09-23 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p415175_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Abstract: Penetration of nationalist feelings and nationalist ideology amongst Kurds took place at a later than other peoples in the Middle East. Even in the first two decades of the twentieth centuries efforts of some of the Kurdish elite for an independent state

2009 - ISA's 50th ANNUAL CONVENTION "EXPLORING THE PAST, ANTICIPATING THE FUTURE" Pages: 45 pages || Words: 10575 words || 
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5. Spruyt, Hendrik. "Credible Commitments, Domestic Politics and Territorial Compromise: The Case of Israel and the Occupied Territories" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the ISA's 50th ANNUAL CONVENTION "EXPLORING THE PAST, ANTICIPATING THE FUTURE", New York Marriott Marquis, NEW YORK CITY, NY, USA, Feb 15, 2009 Online <PDF>. 2019-09-23 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p310331_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: The paper examines the relationship between domestic institutional arrangements and external policy. Several perspectives in the international relations literature hold that fragmented institutions have advantages in international negotiations. First, the

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