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2010 - Theory vs. Policy? Connecting Scholars and Practitioners Words: 34 words || 
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1. Shah, Nisha. "The Territorial Trap of the Territorial Trap: Governmentality and the Global Jail Break" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the Theory vs. Policy? Connecting Scholars and Practitioners, New Orleans Hilton Riverside Hotel, The Loews New Orleans Hotel, New Orleans, LA, Feb 17, 2010 <Not Available>. 2020-02-24 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p413674_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Abstract: This paper argues that attempts by prevailing theories of globalization to overcome what Agnew called the ‘territorial trap’ are besought by an additional territorial trap: sovereignty is implicitly reduced to impermeable territorial borders. Globalizatio

2017 - APSA Annual Meeting & Exhibition Words: 239 words || 
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2. Ziogas, Ioannis. "Territorial Peace Revisited: New States, Territorial Claims, and Democratization" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the APSA Annual Meeting & Exhibition, TBA, San Francisco, CA, Aug 31, 2017 <Not Available>. 2020-02-24 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1257925_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: The interstate conflict literature has most recently been concerned with “birth legacies” and the effects of state formation processes on the conflict propensity of newly independent states. The patterns uncovered by these efforts indicate that pre-independence violence has a persistent and resonating impact on the future behavior of a new state that is independent of the specific process by which the latter emerged (i.e. decolonization, secession, liberation, or unification). In simple terms, a violent state emergence increases the hazard of future conflict between the new state and any of its neighbors, although the issues over which this bellicose behavior will be expressed have been left largely underexplored. In this paper I attempt to build on these findings and to provide an alternative explanation for the widely known “territorial peace” argument by focusing exclusively on new states and their adjacent counterparts. I argue that the means by which independence was achieved (violent or peaceful) greatly influence the likelihood of future territorial contestations and the subsequent prospects of new states’ democratization. Preliminary findings support my claims for a period spanning from 1816-2011. A peaceful emergence mitigates territorial confrontations and leads to faster democratization. Violent births, on the other hand, are precursors of future dissatisfaction over existing territorial distributions, resulting in a greater frequency of territorial claims and hindering democratization. In light of these findings, the “territorial peace” thesis needs to be adjusted in order to incorporate arguments of state formation processes.

2019 - LASA Words: 245 words || 
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3. Hoyos Gomez, Diana. "The state, rural communities and territorial peace: development plans with territorial focus in Montes de María, Colombia" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the LASA, Boston Marriott Copley Place, Boston, MA, USA, May 24, 2019 <Not Available>. 2020-02-24 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1463939_index.html>
Publication Type: Session Paper
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: The development plans with territorial focus –PDETS- were incorporated in the Peace Accords signed between the Colombian government and the FARC guerrilla in 2016. The purpose of the PDETS is to create conditions to build peace in the rural areas that have been affected by armed conflict as well as to promote the presence of the state, and to guarantee the political, social, economic, cultural and environmental rights of rural populations.

This paper examines some aspects related to the significance, implications and challenges of the formulation and implementation of the PDETS in Montes de Maria concerning territorial peace building, and specifically the relationships between the state and rural communities. The formulation of PDETS relies on participatory mechanisms which allow to define the necessities of the territories from a bottom-up approach. Rural communities play a central role in the formulation of PDETS in interaction with state officials as well as other relevant actors in these territories. Although this is a potential strong aspect for territorial peace building and reshaping the relationships between the state and rural communities, state practices that have been taking place in these territories for years could interfere with these dynamics.

The paper relies on ethnographic fieldwork conducted in Montes de Maria for 12 months, and particularly in the municipality of Ovejas. Interviews with relevant actors, participant observation in different stages of formulation of the PDETS and documents resulting from this process are the base for the analysis presented in this paper.

2011 - International Studies Association Annual Conference "Global Governance: Political Authority in Transition" Words: 196 words || 
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4. Norlen, Tova. "Territory and Sacrifice: Understanding the Role of Territoriality in Conflict" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the International Studies Association Annual Conference "Global Governance: Political Authority in Transition", Le Centre Sheraton Montreal Hotel, MONTREAL, QUEBEC, CANADA, Mar 16, 2011 <Not Available>. 2020-02-24 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p501199_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Abstract: Much of the recent literature on religious violence and suicide bombings fails to address the role of martyrdom, and the connection between sacred texts, doctrines of self-sacrifice, and political ideology. My paper aims to fill this gap by looking at one type of martyrdom in particular, that connected to the defense or redemption of territory. In exploring the link between human territoriality, ethnic identity and the willingness to sacrifice, I argue that a distinction needs to be made between the violence that is committed by messianic groups and that which is triggered by sacred ethno-territorial attachments. While messianic fundamentalism produces a type of violence that can be enormously difficult to prevent, land-based political violence occurring within a conflict environment may be abated if political strategies are devised to address them. Using examples from the Israeli-Palestinian conflict, this paper explores the sacred and political influences that lead people to sacrifice themselves for a specific territory. It finds that while messianic fundamentalism may spark individuals and groups to commit terrible atrocities, territorial martyrdom is often born from political violence, and sometimes accorded victims posthumously. Identifying such a process helps explain the role that territoriality plays for conflict intractability.

2010 - American Sociological Association Annual Meeting Pages: unavailable || Words: 10785 words || 
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5. Heritage, John. "Territories of Knowledge, Territories of Experience: Emapthic Moments in Interaction" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Sociological Association Annual Meeting, Hilton Atlanta and Atlanta Marriott Marquis, Atlanta, GA, Aug 14, 2010 Online <APPLICATION/PDF>. 2020-02-24 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p412202_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Much work within linguistics and conversation analysis has been devoted to examining how shared knowledge and mutual understanding are managed. Much less effort has been focused on how the sharing of personal experience is managed as an interactional process. Yet this kind of sharing involves some of the most intimate forms of mutuality between persons, and may be central in the formation and management of social bonds. This paper offers a sketch of some of the ways in which recipients of talk about personal experiences can manage (or fail to manage) moments of empathic connection with their interlocutors.

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