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2010 - Theory vs. Policy? Connecting Scholars and Practitioners Pages: 44 pages || Words: 16464 words || 
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1. Marsden, Sarah. "Does Society Face One Terrorism, or Many Terrorisms? Social Movement Theory as a Foundation for the Typological Analysis of Terrorism" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the Theory vs. Policy? Connecting Scholars and Practitioners, New Orleans Hilton Riverside Hotel, The Loews New Orleans Hotel, New Orleans, LA, Feb 17, 2010 Online <APPLICATION/X-MSDOWNLOAD>. 2020-01-19 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p415182_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: The lack of a theoretical framework in the study of terrorism has long been recognized. This paper attempts to address this by applying Social Movement Theory to the question of why some groups which use are more successful than others. This aims to inform the development of a typology of terrorism, looking at generalizable features of groups which use terrorism strategically. This paper therefore presents the framework for the operationalisation of the typology through the application of empirical data, which represents the next step in this research project. Social Movement Theory has the advantage of addressing the micro, meso and macro levels of analysis, thus allowing a fuller investigation of the subject. Hence, the key features of the theory, namely political opportunity, framing, and mobilizing resources, will be deconstructed and used as indicators to inform typological development. This aims to identify key differences between groups that use terrorism, and their defining features, and will feed into a discussion on the potential for terrorism prevention. This paper therefore speaks to the critical relationship between theory and practice in the study of terrorism; bringing together theory, an organizing framework for empirical analysis and its practical application.

2010 - Theory vs. Policy? Connecting Scholars and Practitioners Pages: 25 pages || Words: 7321 words || 
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2. Stohl, Michael. "Framing Terrorism: Terrorism, Networks, and Counter-Terrorism from George W. Bush to Barack Obama" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the Theory vs. Policy? Connecting Scholars and Practitioners, New Orleans Hilton Riverside Hotel, The Loews New Orleans Hotel, New Orleans, LA, Feb 17, 2010 Online <PDF>. 2020-01-19 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p416603_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: One of the first major foreign policy announcements of the Obama administration centered on the change in direction in counter terrorism with the administration making very clear its intention to move away from the "Global War on Terror (GWOT)" to the con

2009 - ISPP 32nd Annual Scientific Meeting Words: 215 words || 
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3. Kossowska, Malgorzata. and Golec de Zavala, Agnieszka. "Impact of authoritarian orientations and perception of terrorism on the level of perceived terrorism threat and preferences for counter terrorism actions" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the ISPP 32nd Annual Scientific Meeting, Trinity College, Dublin, Ireland, Jul 14, 2009 <Not Available>. 2020-01-19 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p314626_index.html>
Publication Type: Paper (prepared oral presentation)
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Perhaps one of the most important questions that needs to be answered in order to understand responses to the terrorist threat is how people perceive terrorists, their characteristics and motivations. The way people cope with the terrorist threat is likely to depend on their cognitive appraisal of the source of threat. Decisions about collective actions against terrorism are made based on shared and salient representations of terrorists, their intentions and characteristics.
In the present paper we demonstrate that the way people tend to perceive terrorists is related to their ideas of the best and most effective counter-terrorist actions. When terrorists are perceived as freedom fighters on the side of the enemy, war on terrorism is preferred and possibility of dialogue is rejected. People who perceive terrorist as criminals tend to seek solutions that would guarantee that terrorists are ‘reformed’ and follow the laws and norms of the Western countries. Moreover, the results of the study reveal that framing the image of terrorists as soldiers or criminals results in preference for different counter terrorist strategies but only among people to whom a given image seems convincing (i.e. perception of terrorists as soldiers of the enemy is related to high SDO and perception of terrorists as psychopathic criminals is predicted by high levels of SDO and RWA).

2008 - ISA's 49th ANNUAL CONVENTION, BRIDGING MULTIPLE DIVIDES Pages: 29 pages || Words: 5995 words || 
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4. Poulin, Michael., Cohen Silver, Roxane. and Blum, Scott. "How Does Terrorism Work? Perceived Likelihood of Future Terrorism and 9/11-Related Distress Predict Anti-terrorism Policy Preferences" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the ISA's 49th ANNUAL CONVENTION, BRIDGING MULTIPLE DIVIDES, Hilton San Francisco, SAN FRANCISCO, CA, USA, Mar 26, 2008 Online <PDF>. 2020-01-19 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p251494_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Abstract: Are public views on anti-terrorism policies driven by concerns about future threats or by emotional responses to a prior attack? A terrorist attack on the scale of 9/11 is both a harbinger of future threat and a discrete, one-time national trauma. We sought to distinguish between a) perceptions of the future threat of terrorism and b) responses to the 9/11 attacks themselves as predictors of Americans’ national security policy preferences. Using an anonymous Web-based survey methodology, we surveyed a nationally representative sample of US adults (N=1613, 75% response rate) in late 2006 and early 2007. Respondents rated the likelihood of another terrorist attack occurring on U.S. soil in the near future. They also reported any experience of terror-related posttraumatic stress symptoms (PTS) in the form of intrusive thoughts and images resulting from 9/11. In addition, respondents expressed their degree of support for anti-terrorism policies in three ways: 1) as having desired an aggressive U.S. response to 9/11, 2) as support for ongoing military involvement in Afghanistan and Iraq, and 3) as willingness to sacrifice civil liberties for security. Multiple regression analyses adjusting for political affiliation, general psychological distress, exposure to 9/11, and other key variables revealed that both perceived likelihood of future terrorism and 9/11-related PTS independently predicted greater support for all three categories of anti-terrorism policies. Moreover, perceived likelihood and PTS interacted such that perceived likelihood of future terrorism did not predict policy preferences among individuals high in PTS. Public views on future-oriented policies may be disproportionately influenced by distressing experiences from the past.

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