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2013 - MWERA Annual Meeting Pages: unavailable || Words: 5155 words || 
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1. Adikorley, Ruth. and Paulins, Virginia. "Addressing Access Barriers through Collaborative Opportunities for Textile Tertiary Education and the Textile Industry in Ghana" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the MWERA Annual Meeting, Hilton Orrington Hotel, Evanston, Illinois, Nov 06, 2013 Online <PDF>. 2019-04-18 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p674731_index.html>
Publication Type: Paper Presentation
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Ghana is an African county rich in culture; a key component of the culture being its tradition of textiles with colorful and bold motifs. Graduates of textiles programs in tertiary education programs face a challenging job market due to the economic conditions of the textile industry (Quartey, 2006). Pelelo (2009) suggested that economic benefits could result for African nations from educational reform.
This paper presents an analysis of curricular review of tertiary textiles program at one Ghanaian public institution for the purpose of identifying opportunities for collaboration with industry – ultimately to identify job prospects for future graduates. Industry representatives, government officials, as well as both faculty members and students, contributed to the data; suggestions for collaboration were derived from their views and experiences.

2010 - 4S Annual Meeting - Abstract and Session Submissions Words: 489 words || 
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2. Paiva, Eduardo. "From Textile to Textual: Spatial Transmutation of the Textile Company Brasil Industrial’s Buildings in Paracambi - RJ" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the 4S Annual Meeting - Abstract and Session Submissions, Komaba I Campus, University of Tokyo, Tokyo, Japan, Aug 25, 2010 <Not Available>. 2019-04-18 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p422677_index.html>
Publication Type: Paper Abstract
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: The flow of sociotechnical transformations produces materialities that can be observed through the transmutation of areas affected by them, leaving over the time, a legacy, in general, larger than that left by the flow of power. Within this context, the textile factory space was one of the greatest inspirations, one of the largest laboratories and one of the main "victims" of the trajectory of Fordist production models. In Brazil, particularly in Rio de Janeiro, starting from the second half of the 19th century, many buildings were built for the installation of textile manufacturers. These enterprises experienced their heyday in the first half of the 20th century. During that time they were all place of important local sociotechnical framing. However, in the early '70s, the Recession and the Oil Crisis triggered a set of processes that eliminated the Fordist’s commitments of then. This framework led to the consolidation of new models of accumulation and production, characterized by the fluidity and flexibility. This culminated in the late 80's with the so-called “Markets Opening” and the consequent changes in the flow of capital and its investment centers. Thus it was the consolidated end of this classic cycle of the textile industry in Rio de Janeiro and with it the sad closing of buildings, usually monumental and with alien architectural styles. Many of these buildings were, after several negotiations, turned into shopping malls, with some aspects of strategic and cultural venues, such as safe parking areas, compensating former liabilities. This paper will focus on "Textile Company Brasil Industrial”, founded in 1870, in the city of Paracambi, Rio de Janeiro, the first and the largest textile manufacturer of cotton in Brazil, by its time. Its introduction promoted a symbolic clash between local agrarian culture and the projected industrial modernity, represented by human actors, such as British entrepreneurs and other non-human actors, for example, its buildings, its machines, its time clocks, its workers' village, etc. After the closing of " Textile Company Brasil Industrial ", in the late 80's, opens a period of great controversy, which led to its toppling by the State Institute of Artistic and Cultural Heritage (INEPAC). But it was in the early years of the third millennium that their buildings were acquired by the local prefecture, in a daring postmodern project of turning it into a "Knowledge Factory", through the entanglement of the flow of public policy actions of the municipal, state and federal powers, in order to install there teaching units, research and outreach at all levels. Faced with more controversy, various institutions and courses have been deployed there, all of emphasis and informational production, for example, a course in Information Systems, taught at the Instituto Superior de Tecnologia FAETEC-RJ (College of Technology FAETEC-RJ). This paper will analyze, from an approach based on the Actor-Network Theory, the current results of these controversies, which are being able to transmute an area of textile manufacturing in one place of educational textual production.

2011 - International Studies Association Annual Conference "Global Governance: Political Authority in Transition" Pages: 34 pages || Words: 6894 words || 
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3. Jackson, Steven. "Textile Tsunamis and “Ching-ching” Goods: China’s Trade Position in African Countries, 1980-2008" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the International Studies Association Annual Conference "Global Governance: Political Authority in Transition", Le Centre Sheraton Montreal Hotel, MONTREAL, QUEBEC, CANADA, Mar 16, 2011 Online <PDF>. 2019-04-18 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p502724_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Popular western media coverage of Chinese economic activity in Africa portrays a huge economy hungry for raw materials to fuel its relentless economic growth. The treatment of the subject, however, has tended to be anecdotal and conspiratorial, not empirical. Furthermore, less attention is paid in western media to the sale of Chinese products in African markets. This paper will examine the historical trend of China in African export and import profiles from 1980 to the present. It seeks to compare the position of China as export destination and import source for African countries’ products with four other countries: 1) The African country’s former colonial power, 2) The USA, 3) Japan, 4) India. It seeks to determine whether China has become a dominant source of imports and destination of exports for all African countries, and if so which ones. These data will then be considered in light of a number of key changes and events, such as the devaluation of the CFA franc in 1994, the fixing of the Euro in 1999, the liberalization of textile trade through the WTO in 2005.

2011 - American Sociological Association Annual Meeting Pages: unavailable || Words: 5414 words || 
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4. Sarmistha, Uma. "A Rural handloom Textile Industry in Bihar, India: A Case of social embeddedness" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Sociological Association Annual Meeting, Caesar's Palace, Las Vegas, NV, Aug 19, 2011 Online <PDF>. 2019-04-18 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p508302_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: The studies in economic sociology has revealed the importance of the concept of embeddedness and social networking in the functioning of the society. With this, based on an ethnographic field study of the handloom workers of Bihar, India the article briefly describes the production process in the handloom industry. Further, drawing from the economic sociology literature, the paper tries to understand how social networking in the rural labor market can affect economic outcomes. The findings of the study indeed illustrate a unique kind of social networking in the handloom industry arising from caste and religion, which can be associated with the Granovetter’s embeddedness theory.

2007 - International Studies Association 48th Annual Convention Words: 379 words || 
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5. Cantin, Étiene. "The Political History of the New International Division of Labor: Pax Americana, Uneven Development and the Reconstruction of the Asian-Pacific Rim Textile Industry" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the International Studies Association 48th Annual Convention, Hilton Chicago, CHICAGO, IL, USA, Feb 28, 2007 <Not Available>. 2019-04-18 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p180930_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Abstract: This paper examines how the process of making low-wage textiles and apparel in export-processing zones was forged early in the context of the United States? post-World War II effort to contain communism in East Asia and impose on the entire capitalist world economy the famous ?multilateral world order? (aka Pax Americana or ?the imperialism of free trade and investment?). Unlike the occupation of Europe, Japanese industrial reconstruction in the aftermath of World War II took place under the direct authority of the American military, which acted on behalf of the U.S. Department of State and was directly answerable to the American President. The U.S. occupation targeted the textile industry as the key industry to rebuild, in part to thwart the industrial growth and political power of Communist China. In order to contravene China?s ability to influence left-wing insurgencies in Asia, it was necessary to build a Japanese ?workshop? in Asia. Until the late 1950s the reconstruction of the Japanese textile industry was important primarily to the effort to con¬tain communism and promote the political and economic ties that would link Japan to the advanced capitalist economies. However, the reconstruction of Japan?s textile industry and the super-exploitation of women workers that helped Japanese textile manufacturers minimize the cost of textile and apparel production led to the opening of the US market to imports of low-cost textiles and apparel from Japan?a pattern that later continued as textile and apparel production spread to a host of other Far Eastern countries that had never produced Western clothing for export before World War II. By the mid-1950s, textile manufacturers and the workers they employed in the United States were beginning to see the potential problems of trading with developing countries in which a low-wage strategy of industrialization premised upon the super-exploitation of women?s labor prevailed. Asia?s generally lower wages, the even lower wages paid to women, and the higher percentage of women workers all helped make production in these countries attractive to importers and retailers?particularly when productivity levels could, with up-to-date technology, be made comparable to those of units of production based on the American mainland. In this way, uneven capitalist development in the post-World War II global political economy entailed the relative economic decline of textile and garment manufacturing on the American mainland.

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