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2015 - LRA 65th Annual Conference Pages: unavailable || Words: unavailable || 
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1. Smith, Amanda. "Picturing Textual Bodies and Textual Objects: Teens’ Photoethnographic Self-Studies of their Everyday Engagement with Texts" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the LRA 65th Annual Conference, Omni La Costa Resort and Spa, Carlsbad, CA, Dec 02, 2015 Online <APPLICATION/PDF>. 2019-06-15 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1028682_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed

2011 - The 62nd Annual Meeting of the American Research Center in Egypt Words: 79 words || 
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2. Gee, John. "Textual Criticism and Textual Corruption in the Persian Period" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the The 62nd Annual Meeting of the American Research Center in Egypt, Marriott Downtown, Chicago, IL, Apr 01, 2011 <Not Available>. 2019-06-15 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p484545_index.html>
Publication Type: Abstract Proposal
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Knowledge of textual criticism is a necessary quality to edit a text of which there are multiple copies, and a knowledge of the types of textual errors encountered will help those editing text of which there is only one copy. Having already published a study of the types and frequency of errors found in the Coffin Texts, I will here examine Persian Period Texts to see if the same types and frequency of errors occurs at a later period.

2009 - NCA 95th Annual Convention Words: 317 words || 
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3. Houck, Davis. "Textual Recovery, Textual Discovery: Returning to our Past, Imagining our Future" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the NCA 95th Annual Convention, Chicago Hilton & Towers, Chicago, IL, <Not Available>. 2019-06-15 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p329205_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Abstract: Textual recovery and discovery is the process of locating and evaluating primary source documents—in this case speeches—which have the potential to advance our knowledge of public address generally and a significant person, event, genre, and rhetorical situation more specifically. Those speeches can take several forms: we may recover an audiotape or a televised recording of an address, or we may find a reading copy of a speech. Or we may recover a speech as transcribed by a reporter or a member of the audience. Many speeches were later reprinted as pamphlets, while others were reprinted in newspapers, periodicals, and magazines. Ideally, the recovered or discovered speech then moves from the entombed archive to the published article, chapter, book, or Web site. Textual recovery, however, reflects complexities that have a deep and abiding history in the study of American public address. They are bound up with issues of canonicity, gender, class, and race, and they also involve questions about the role of the researcher, the politics and economics of preservation, disciplinary legitimacy, and computer technologies. They even relate to two of the most challenging issues in public address scholarship—the question of effect and the conundrum of delivery. In the first half of the essay, I argue that despite disciplinary traditions that favored speeches by what one scholar deemed “the biggest man,” other scholars ran against the grain and argued for a far more “local” view of American public address, one that eventually resulted in far more inclusive scholarly practices. In the second half of the essay, I offer advice based on my own successes and failures in locating speeches and other primary historical materials as part of an anthology relating to the African American civil rights movement of the 1950s and 1960s. With the multiplication of computer and Internet technologies, the possibilities for public address scholars are truly legion.

2005 - International Communication Association Pages: 31 pages || Words: 8374 words || 
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4. Herman, Bill. "Dead Traders: A Textual Analysis of Websites Trading in Grateful Dead Bootlegs." Paper presented at the annual meeting of the International Communication Association, Sheraton New York, New York City, NY, Online <APPLICATION/PDF>. 2019-06-15 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p13888_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Abstract: The Grateful Dead were perhaps the first to allow their fans (Deadheads) to make audio recordings (bootlegs) of their live shows and trade them with friends. This practice of trading music was an early predecessor of Peer-to-Peer (P2P) trading, a revolutionary use of Internet technology with far-reaching social and economic implications. P2P is generally regarded as the cause of a pitched legal battle between the music industry and consumers, but it has become just another means by which Deadheads have extended their practice of permitted trading. This paper examines Deadhead bootleg trading as described on several fans’ websites. Bootleg trading highlights the interplay between media producers and consumers in negotiating the meaning of media products and the functioning of subcultures in the face of marginalization by the mainstream. In contrast to the recording industry’s efforts to label trading as “piracy,” bootlegging also highlights the social value of decentralized music distribution.

2006 - International Communication Association Pages: 12 pages || Words: 3994 words || 
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5. Nicholas, Kyle. "“The Work Which Becomes a New Genre Itself”: Textual Networks in the World of Cowboy Bebop" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the International Communication Association, Dresden International Congress Centre, Dresden, Germany, Jun 16, 2006 Online <PDF>. 2019-06-15 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p90930_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Abstract: The advent of new media, particularly the World Wide Web and associated audio-visual production technologies, has transformed our sense of adaptation and with it our sense of authorship and authenticity. Media consumers, or ‘readers’, have always been active to some extent, selecting, combining and re-contextualizing portions of their favorite texts. But multimedia networks have both deepened and extended these activities in important ways. Employing digital duplication and production tools, global communities of network users now create and exchange media artifacts of ambiguous provenance. Their activities are blurring the boundaries between author and audience, and transforming the nature of media adaptations.
This paper examines the constellation of texts and activities that comprise Cowboy Bebop, a Japanese television program adapted to feature film, and subsequently repurposed in numerous forms. The paper asserts that three principals emerging from new media and related new audience activities are changing the constitution of media, story and genre. First, all texts are now potentially multimedia, and both commercial and communal players will increasingly exploit these properties. Second, all texts should be understood as networks of form and meaning, with a variety of constituencies contributing to both their shape and content. Third, industrial marketing strategies are supplemented, contested and extended in these new networks and activities. The role of non-commercial, textual communities in quasi-marketing activities is an important consideration in understanding contemporary media adaptation processes.

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