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2004 - American Political Science Association Pages: 23 pages || Words: 9896 words || 
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1. Badgett, M.V.. "Variations on an Equitable Theme: Explaining International Same-Sex Partner Recognition Laws" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Political Science Association, Hilton Chicago and the Palmer House Hilton, Chicago, IL, Sep 02, 2004 <Not Available>. 2019-11-20 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p61711_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Formal legal recognition of same-sex couples that provides at least some rights and responsibilities of marriage has spread rapidly throughout Western Europe, beginning with Denmark in 1989 and now in eight other countries. This article draws on conceptual frameworks of institutional change from several social sciences to explain why the nine countries recognize same-sex partnerships, while other countries with similar economic statuses, social histories, and religious traditions do not. One strand of theory focuses on the efficiency-enhancing potential of institutions, and a second strand of theory focuses on the conflict over institutional change. This paper uses both quantitative regression analysis and Qualitative Comparative Analysis of efficiency-related and conflict-related variables, including social norms, religiosity, political resources, and economic incentives, to explain the pattern of SSPR adoption. The findings suggest that tolerant attitudes toward homosexuality, low religiosity, and high levels of cohabitation are the primary predictors of a country’s legal recognition of same-sex partners.

2007 - American Sociological Association Pages: 31 pages || Words: 8154 words || 
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2. Hansen, Laura. "Re-Imagineering and Hybrid Consumption at Disney Theme Parks: Running the Risk of Product Cannibalism and Consumer Fatigue" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Sociological Association, TBA, New York, New York City, Aug 11, 2007 Online <PDF>. 2019-11-20 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p183159_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Abstract: Amusement park survival is not singularly dependent on tourist attendance. As exemplified by Walt Disney Company theme parks, there is obvious attention to merchandise, particularly items that will advertise the company and the theme park. This study examines the risk of product cannibalism tied to retooling ride attractions at the U.S. Disney theme parks – when new product lines are introduced, distracting from already popular items – and the risk of consumer fatigue from too many product choices. A field study was conducted at the Disneyland Resort in California and secondary data analysis was conducted using DVD archive footage of the Walt Disney World Resort in Florida. Additionally Walt Disney Company monthly and annual SEC financial reports are examined to take into consideration the overall financial health of the company from 2000-2006, a period in which the 45th and 50th anniversaries of Disneyland occurred. 1 Table, 7 Photographs, 25 References.

2004 - International Communication Association Pages: 18 pages || Words: 8936 words || 
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3. Riegert, Kristina. "Good Europeans? Euro-Themes in Swedish, Danish and British TV News" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the International Communication Association, New Orleans Sheraton, New Orleans, LA, May 27, 2004 Online <.PDF>. 2019-11-20 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p112519_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: The paper analyses Swedish, Danish and British news about Europe from the perspective that television news narratives are sites where collective (i.e. national and international) identities are cultivated and mobilised through the contrast between ‘we’ and ‘others’. The issue is not if European stories are domesticated to fit national news bulletins, but how events are domesticated, and what meanings are made from these by the programmes’ producers. The results indicate that viewers are offered different images of Europe during the week 15-21 November 1999, and that the journalists play active roles in constructing ‘themes’ which link together different types of news stories about Europe into stories about ‘us’. The Swedish ‘we’ was characterised as a moralising global villager, slightly superior but willing to adapt to the outside world, the Danish ‘We’ appeared as an anxious and conscientious European, trying to do its share, despite its reservations on EU cooperation. The British ‘We’ was characterised as the engaged international humanitarian who prefers to keep a distance from time-consuming Euro-squabbles.

2008 - WESTERN POLITICAL SCIENCE ASSOCIATION Pages: 39 pages || Words: 12800 words || 
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4. Gomez, Adam. "We Wrestle Not Against Flesh and Blood: Themes of Civil Religion in Woodrow Wilson's Public Speech" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the WESTERN POLITICAL SCIENCE ASSOCIATION, Manchester Hyatt, San Diego, California, Mar 20, 2008 Online <PDF>. 2019-11-20 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p238248_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Abstract: Though the subject has in many ways fallen from prominence in academic debate, American civil religion as a language of political discourse once more came to prominence in the wake of the September 11th attacks and during the buildup to the war in Iraq. Taking a historical perspective, I argue that many of the civil religious themes which were used by the current administration to generate compliance with its domestic and foreign policy agenda originate in the administration of Woodrow Wilson and the rhetoric which surrounded American involvement in the First World War. I locate two visions of the American political project within the tradition of American civil religion: one, which I term the model perspective, conceives of the United States as an example for the world to see and emulate, while the other, which I refer to as the missionary perspective, conceives of the American political project as being to spread the “good news” of democratic governance across the globe. I argue that these two perspectives have consequences for American foreign policy, with eras dominated by the model perspective tending isolationist, while times marked by the missionary perspective tend interventionist. The two, however, are not mutually exclusive, and it is my claim that when both perspectives are strongly present, as I argue is the case in the Wilson administration, American foreign policy is at its most aggressive.

2008 - International Communication Association Pages: 27 pages || Words: 6236 words || 
Info
5. Page, Janis. and Duffy, Margaret. "U.S. Presidential Campaign 2008: A Fantasy Theme Analysis of Visual Stories Spun on the Web" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the International Communication Association, TBA, Montreal, Quebec, Canada, May 22, 2008 Online <APPLICATION/PDF>. 2019-11-20 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p234309_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Abstract: This exploratory study seeks to link visual theory with Symbolic Convergence Theory as a way to develop deeper and richer understandings of political discourse in a digital media world. Using candidates in the 2008 U.S. presidential campaign, the study explores how the Internet affects their messaging and campaign behaviors as they attempt to tailor their messages to very specific demographics and interest groups. It analyzes a traditionally central rhetorical strategy of these presidential candidates, the personal story, now found on the candidate’s official websites. Applying fantasy theme analysis, we consider how the photographic images found on the biographical sections of the sites are used in an effort to build intimate relationships with various voting publics. Fantasies of patriotism, family, heritage, multi-culturalism, and populism are identified in both parties’ candidates. Within the parties the visual strategies of the sites are stereotypical and clichéd, and seem to flatten the differences rather than highlight the candidates’ qualities. Between the parties, differences are observed in motives and perceptions of what should be valued. Results suggest that analysts have a powerful tool for understanding rhetorical communication in today’s online and rich media environment using SCT.

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