Guest  

 
Search: 
Search By: SubjectAbstractAuthorTitleFull-Text

 

Showing 1 through 5 of 391 records.
Pages: Previous - 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 ... 79 - Next  Jump:
2011 - SCRA Biennial Meeting Words: 226 words || 
Info
1. Todd, Nathan. "Connecting Theology and Community Psychology with a Focus on Liberation Theology and Black Theology" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the SCRA Biennial Meeting, Roosevelt University/Harold Washington Library, Chicago, IL, <Not Available>. 2019-06-25 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p503350_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Abstract: Although the field of community psychology has long called for research, theory, and collaboration with religious settings (e.g., Kloos & Moore, 2000; Pargament, 2008), this call has yet to be fully realized. One potential difficulty in connecting community psychology and religious communities is that the group-based belief systems of religious communities may be uniquely theological in nature, a dimension possibly unfamiliar to many community psychologists. Thus, a deeper understanding of what theology is and how it is formed, i.e., basic dimensions of theology, may enable greater understanding and collaboration between community psychologists and religious organizations. The purpose of this presentation is to provide a basic introduction to theology with a special emphasis on liberation theology in general and Black theology in particular. The presentation begins with connections between community psychology and theology. The presentation continues with a general introduction to theology and a description of how theology traditionally has been formed. Next, a specific type of theology, i.e., liberation theology, is described and then contrasted with traditional theology. The development of Black theology, one type of liberation theology, also is discussed in historical context (Cone, 2003). Links between Black theology, liberation theology, and community psychology also will be presented (Author citation, in press). Overall, this presentation provides an introduction to theology as well as Black theology, providing a foundation for the other presentations in the symposium.

2017 - 102nd Annual Meeting and Conference of the Association for the Study of African American Life and History Words: 170 words || 
Info
2. McKissick, Sierra. "Won't You Be My Neighbor: A critical reflection on the relationship between science, theology and health care delivery using theological ethnography and womanist ethic of care" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the 102nd Annual Meeting and Conference of the Association for the Study of African American Life and History, Hilton Cincinnati Netherland Plaza Hotel, Cincinnati, OH, <Not Available>. 2019-06-25 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1285471_index.html>
Publication Type: Abstract
Abstract: In this thesis I offer a critique of the United States health care system and posit that a better relationship between the social sciences and theology could pave the way for better public health programs and services. My argument uses texts from ethnographic and Womanist theologians Christian Scharen and Emilie Townes as well as the work of psychoanalyst D.W. Winnicott. My critique echoes the work of other scholarship in religiously based approaches to healing that critique health systems medical care for people with illnesses in the Black communities. My addition creatively uses culture, and specifically Black culture when possible, to offer an unfeigned rally cry for the academy and Christian community to join in reviving Black health. I will explore how communal lament coupled with the concept of everyday people engaging in communion with their neighbor has the potential to provide healing in Black life and ignite a revival within Black communities of care. The rally cry calls for the community to join in a revival to revitalize Black health.

2012 - Nineteenth Annual Conference of the Council for European Studies Words: 248 words || 
Info
3. Robinson, Matthew. "Theology, an Intellectual Tradition?: Resurrections of Theology as a Critical Discourse" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the Nineteenth Annual Conference of the Council for European Studies, Omni Parker House Hotel, Boston, MA, Mar 22, 2012 <Not Available>. 2019-06-25 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p545959_index.html>
Publication Type: Individual Paper
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: My paper looks at the discipline of theology as an object of historical and sociological interest. I discuss its role as an intellectual tradition in European thought that attempts to synthesize pressing philosophical questions and socio-empirical contexts. The paper considers two such instances in German theology.

First, I discuss the total reconfiguration of theology by Friedrich Schleiermacher following the Enlightenment. Schleiermacher’s importance in the history of theology cannot be overestimated, as he is universally described by followers and opponents as the “father of modern theology.” Schleiermacher presented theology as a historical-sociological method serving a humanistic ethic. Theology uses a humanistic philosophical anthropology to interpret socio-empirical data. The present place of theology as a humanistic empirical discipline having a place among the other human sciences in the university is due to Schleiermacher. Second, I discuss present-day theologian Wilhelm Gräb’s understanding of theology/ies as varieties of human self-expression. Gräb, who draws heavily on Schleiermacher, combines an interest in philosophical questions of the self with empirical studies in the anthropology of communication. Theology in this case is seen as a simultaneously empirical and philosophical discourse that can identify trends and changes, not only in the history of ideas, but in the history of values and meaning.

Many scholars in the humanities view theology as stridently ideological and dogmatic. This view, however, does not agree with leading self-understandings of academic theology in Europe, where theology has been understood as a philosophical-empirical discipline. Who is to be believed? What is at stake?

2011 - SCRA Biennial Meeting Words: 152 words || 
Info
4. Martin, Pamela. and Bowles, Tuere. "Pentecostalism, Prosperity Gospel, and Black Liberation Theology: Are the Diverse Theological Orientations in Black Mega-Churches the Link to Social Outreach?" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the SCRA Biennial Meeting, Roosevelt University/Harold Washington Library, Chicago, IL, <Not Available>. 2019-06-25 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p503351_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Abstract: Empirical research on Black churches traditionally has focused either on denominational studies or investigations that link religious involvement with health outcomes (Barnes, 2004; 2008; 2010; Lincoln & Mayima, 1990; Taylor, Chatters, & Levin, 2004). Consequently, research on Black mega-churches has been limited at best. For example, some scholars have raised anecdotal questions regarding the extent to which Black mega-churches impede or enhance economical, educational, political, psychological, and social experiences among African Americans. However, providing empirical answers to their research questions necessitates some examinations of the theological orientations and social outreach efforts of Black mega-churches. This qualitative study utilized content analyses to examine sermons and websites of 12 mega-churches. Results revealed four, broad theological themes: honoring the Holy Spirit, heavenly minded, Biblical principles, and social legacy. These themes related to the social outreach efforts of the mega-churches. The implications of the findings for clergy and researchers are discussed.

2009 - NCA 95th Annual Convention Pages: unavailable || Words: 8236 words || 
Info
5. Rossi Keen, Daniel. "Outlining a Feminist Theology for Men: Contemporary Appropriations of Historic Belief Patterns in the Theology of Jürgen Moltmann" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the NCA 95th Annual Convention, Chicago Hilton & Towers, Chicago, IL, Nov 11, 2009 Online <PDF>. 2019-06-25 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p366798_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: In "Experiences in Theology," Jürgen Moltmann offers describes his involvement with feminist theology. In this paper I address how Moltmann’s writing may be viewed through the lens of contemporary feminist theology. Although Moltmann’s writing is neither systematically nor confessionally feminist in nature, his work nonetheless provides much needed prolegomena to a more mature and explicit feminist approach to the discipline of theology—a manifestation of feminist theology amenable both to men and women alike.

Pages: Previous - 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 ... 79 - Next  Jump:

©2019 All Academic, Inc.   |   All Academic Privacy Policy