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2006 - American Political Science Association Pages: 32 pages || Words: 10238 words || 
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1. Siemers, David. "Theories about Theory: Accounts of how Political Theory Affected the Presidency of James Madison" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Political Science Association, Marriott, Loews Philadelphia, and the Pennsylvania Convention Center, Philadelphia, PA, Aug 31, 2006 <Not Available>. 2019-02-19 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p151849_index.html>
Publication Type: Proceeding
Abstract: In this paper I define three different types of theory about theory based on scholarship about James Madison. The theories about theory suggest different ways in which theory affects the "real world." A "content based theory" suggests that politicians accept and use ideas from specific political theorists. A "nature of theory itself" argument, by contrast, suggests that it is the act of theorizing that produces the effect. Attention to Madison scholarship reveals two different kinds of nature of theory itself arguments. A "pure" nature of theory itself argument suggests that theory and theorizing almost inevitably has a certain effect on those who do it and the politics which results when political leaders theorize. An "affiliated" nature of theory itself argument is much more circumscribed. Its only claim is that an individual politician's theoretical bent has affected that individual in a particular way. I stress that the demonstration of each kind of argument depends on different kinds of evidence and that while any of these arguments may be made poorly or well, the amount and type of evidence required to demonstrate a pure nature of theory itself claim is so extensive, that such arguments have remained suggestive.

2017 - American Sociological Association Annual Meeting Pages: unavailable || Words: unavailable || 
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2. Neri, Hugo. "New Developments on Elias’ Theory: An Integration between the Figurational Theory and the Social Network´s Theory" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Sociological Association Annual Meeting, Palais des Congrès de Montréal, Montreal, Canada, Aug 09, 2017 Online <APPLICATION/PDF>. 2019-02-19 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1251510_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: This working paper has two main challenges: a) resume two contemporary theories to b) glimpse new developments from their integration. First, we resume the figurational theory proposed by the German sociologist Norbert Elias trying to highlight how disruptive and innovative his ideas are. Second, we resume the developments of the (social) network studies. Third, we seek to link both theories so they aid each other achieving new devel-opments. We illustrate the last step trying to convert part of Elias’ arguments in Mozart, Zur Soziologie eines Genies in a network. The expected outcome is on the one hand, Eli-as’ figurational theory gain applications with calculus and visualization elements from the network studies. On the other hand, the social network studies gain theoretical robustness with Elias’ theory.

2018 - American Sociological Association Annual Meeting Pages: unavailable || Words: 9242 words || 
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3. Bakker, J. I.. "Grounded Theory and Sociological Theory: Transcending the Methodology-Theory Divide" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Sociological Association Annual Meeting, Pennsylvania Convention Center & Philadelphia Marriott, Philadelphia, PA, Aug 09, 2018 Online <PDF>. 2019-02-19 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1379854_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: What is “theory” in sociology? The answer requires looking at different levels of theory. At the most abstract level, where issues related to epistemology, ontology, axiology, teleology and validity come into play it is very hard to separate Theory from Methodology. The “epistemological others” that can be differentiated from various forms of “Positivism” (Steinmetz 2005a) include grounded theory. It is not Grand Theory or Abstracted Empricism (Mills 1959). In this essay I explore some of the issues related to grounded theory as a sociological theory and grounded theory in general. I discuss such topics as: Grounded Theory as a Methodology or Logic of Method (GTM and Grounded Theory as a set of tools and techniques or “methods” in the narrower sense (GT). What is original in this essay is the attempt to link discussions of grounded theory to a broader literature on sociological theory. Often “methods” refers to techniques. Some regard grounded theory as just another technique for doing qualitative research. But Theory-in-general (Tg) and Methodology-in-general (Mg) are closely intertwined. The Methodenstreit in Europe circa the 1890s involved much more than a struggle over techniques for carrying out social science research. It went to the heart of the matter, especially the literature on: (1.) idiographic description (“thick description”), (2.) nomological laws (and law-like “realist” generalizations), and (3.) ideal types, considered not only in isolation but as components of Ideal Type Models (ITMs). Is it possible to have a realist theory (as in Critical Realism) if that theory is not nomothetic for all of the relevant “universe” (e.g. the last five thousand or more years of human history)? Are generalizations that emerge from grounded theory research “realist” or “idealist”?

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