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2017 - American Sociological Association Annual Meeting Pages: unavailable || Words: unavailable || 
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1. Neri, Hugo. "New Developments on Elias’ Theory: An Integration between the Figurational Theory and the Social Network´s Theory" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Sociological Association Annual Meeting, Palais des Congrès de Montréal, Montreal, Canada, Aug 09, 2017 Online <APPLICATION/PDF>. 2019-12-07 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1251510_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: This working paper has two main challenges: a) resume two contemporary theories to b) glimpse new developments from their integration. First, we resume the figurational theory proposed by the German sociologist Norbert Elias trying to highlight how disruptive and innovative his ideas are. Second, we resume the developments of the (social) network studies. Third, we seek to link both theories so they aid each other achieving new devel-opments. We illustrate the last step trying to convert part of Elias’ arguments in Mozart, Zur Soziologie eines Genies in a network. The expected outcome is on the one hand, Eli-as’ figurational theory gain applications with calculus and visualization elements from the network studies. On the other hand, the social network studies gain theoretical robustness with Elias’ theory.

2008 - American Sociological Association Annual Meeting Pages: 23 pages || Words: 6989 words || 
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2. SmÃ¥ngs, Mattias. "Differential associations, control theory, and the strength of weak ties—linking criminological theories with social network theory" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Sociological Association Annual Meeting, Sheraton Boston and the Boston Marriott Copley Place, Boston, MA, Jul 31, 2008 Online <PDF>. 2019-12-07 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p242434_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Abstract: A long-lived debate within criminology concerns juvenile delinquents and their peer relations. The social ability model, represented by, for example, Sutherland’s theory of differential associations, argues that delinquents are to be conceived of as people with normal social capabilities. The social inability model, represented by, for example, Hirschi’s control theory, contends that delinquents lack social capabilities and are unable to engage in meaningful relationships with others. The paper assesses the plausibility of these competing conceptions of juvenile delinquents and their peer relations by using explicit and elaborate social network theory in the form of Granovetter’s theory of the strength of weak ties. The implications of this theory for the competing criminological theories are analyzed theoretically, an analysis resulting in a number of hypotheses. The hypotheses are tested empirically using a data set containing information on relations among delinquents in the form of co-offending, covering all persons under the age of 20 who were suspected of criminal offences in the Swedish city of Borlänge during a three year period. The results of the empirical analyses clearly support the social ability model.

2012 - Eighth Annual Congress of Qualitative Inquiry Words: 116 words || 
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3. Olmanson, Justin. "Moving Sideways: Methodological Wayfaring, New Ethnographic Writing, NonRepresentational Theory, Weak Theory, and ActorNetwork Theory in Educational Research" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the Eighth Annual Congress of Qualitative Inquiry, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, Illinois, May 16, 2012 <Not Available>. 2019-12-07 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p558625_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: In this paper and presentation I outline several of the sideways moves I used in my dissertation work. While critical and postmodern epistemological orientations resonated with me more than positivist or interpretivist ones did I still felt like they were still too dependent upon the dominant meta-narratives of research. The notion of a sideways move comes from the work of Kathleen Stewart. She writes of methodological and analytical actions which create a form of address that varies from the typical knowledge projects in social science research. From this beginning I describe my methodological wayfaring and how I used New Ethnographic Writing, NonRepresentational Theory, Weak Theory, and ActorNetwork Theory in my efforts to engage in educational research

2018 - American Sociological Association Annual Meeting Pages: unavailable || Words: 9242 words || 
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4. Bakker, J. I.. "Grounded Theory and Sociological Theory: Transcending the Methodology-Theory Divide" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Sociological Association Annual Meeting, Pennsylvania Convention Center & Philadelphia Marriott, Philadelphia, PA, Aug 09, 2018 Online <PDF>. 2019-12-07 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1379854_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: What is “theory” in sociology? The answer requires looking at different levels of theory. At the most abstract level, where issues related to epistemology, ontology, axiology, teleology and validity come into play it is very hard to separate Theory from Methodology. The “epistemological others” that can be differentiated from various forms of “Positivism” (Steinmetz 2005a) include grounded theory. It is not Grand Theory or Abstracted Empricism (Mills 1959). In this essay I explore some of the issues related to grounded theory as a sociological theory and grounded theory in general. I discuss such topics as: Grounded Theory as a Methodology or Logic of Method (GTM and Grounded Theory as a set of tools and techniques or “methods” in the narrower sense (GT). What is original in this essay is the attempt to link discussions of grounded theory to a broader literature on sociological theory. Often “methods” refers to techniques. Some regard grounded theory as just another technique for doing qualitative research. But Theory-in-general (Tg) and Methodology-in-general (Mg) are closely intertwined. The Methodenstreit in Europe circa the 1890s involved much more than a struggle over techniques for carrying out social science research. It went to the heart of the matter, especially the literature on: (1.) idiographic description (“thick description”), (2.) nomological laws (and law-like “realist” generalizations), and (3.) ideal types, considered not only in isolation but as components of Ideal Type Models (ITMs). Is it possible to have a realist theory (as in Critical Realism) if that theory is not nomothetic for all of the relevant “universe” (e.g. the last five thousand or more years of human history)? Are generalizations that emerge from grounded theory research “realist” or “idealist”?

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